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Wednesday, 18 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Systemd dominates and Debian, Ubuntu, Git updates – Linux Snippets Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 8:10am
Story Free cloud access to IBM Power servers for Linux Developers Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 8:05am
Story Phusion Releases Robust Docker Base Image Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 7:49am
Story Steam OS, client update brings audio improvements Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2014 - 7:42am
Story OpenDaylight: Open Source Programming to the Software-Defined Network Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 11:18pm
Story What Makes a Classic Linux Desktop 'Classic'? Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 11:11pm
Story Tizen-based Samsung smartwatch rumored Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 9:55pm
Story French local politicians support free software Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 7:45pm
Story Who helps your Linux distribution run smoothly? Thank a packager today Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 7:09pm
Story Linux job market heats up Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2014 - 6:51pm

Install Fireworks on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

When I installed Ububto on my laptop I decided to learn Gimp. Well that didn’t go very well, so I tried a few others. But after a week I must say they just don’t toe the line, at least not for me. So what follows is how I installed fireworks.

Open-Source Vendors at Risk of Being Priced Out

Filed under
OSS

Larry Ellison knew Oracle needed its own operating system, and the Redwood Shores software company had a choice: Build it or buy it. But Ellison told attendees at last week's Oracle's OpenWorld conference that he'd found a third way -- take an operating system from another business. What Oracle did wasn't without precedent, but it crossed a line that some parts of the open-source community saw as violating the spirit of the technology.

Krita & Kontact sitting in a tree...

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

Applications is what will bring people to Linux. But Firefox and Amarok aren’t the only apps to wow people with. The open source world looks to be succeeding in the e-mail realm as well. Introducing Kontact, KDE’s Personal Information Management application.

Also: Krita is a fully-loaded raster graphics workhorse that stands on its own.

HOW-TO: Configuring Your Mouse To Work With All 5 Buttons

Filed under
HowTos

The problem I had was that the mouse (Logitech MX518 by the way), did not work as intended by the manufacturer. More specifically the back and forward buttons on my mouse didn't do what they should when I was browsing (in any browser). Ofcourse it works fine in Windows and I bought the mouse because I wanted a good gaming mouse, but since Linux (Fedora Core 5) is my main OS I wanted those buttons to work as expected.

Pointers and memory leaks in C

Filed under
Linux

In this article you'll learn about the types of pointer operations that can cause memory corruption and you'll also examine some scenarios that show what to consider while working with dynamic memory allocation. Pointers and memory leaks might seem to be deterrents to some programmers but, once you understand the fundamentals of pointers and associated memory operations, they will be the most powerful tool you posses in C.

Quicktips - Saving man pages as text documents.

Filed under
HowTos

We’ve all agreed that Man pages are a wonderful utility and probably the best thing invented since air-sickness pills. Now wouldn’t it be nice if you could save the output from a man command into a handy text document?

Full Tip.

Secure SSH

Filed under
HowTos

SSH is not only the secure replacement for rlogin, rsh and telnet, which has been used in the past to do remote administration work, but there are also neat tricks like port forwarding, vpn tunneling and file transfers that you can do with minimal configuration work, leaving only one port open to the internets.

Does free software taste great, or is open source less filling?

Filed under
OSS

Which do you like best: the satisfying, rich taste of principle in free software? Or do you prefer the less morally filling and pragmatic goodness of open source? Do you wish people would stop endlessly rehashing the whole question of "free" versus "open source?" Or do you enjoy the chance to talk about goals and philosophy?

A Linux start-up on the path to profits

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

Ubuntu has been a phenomenon in the desktop Linux niche. But Canonical Chief Executive Mark Shuttleworth, who founded the project, has his eyes on the more lucrative server market. Shuttleworth discussed his agenda with CNET News.com's Stephen Shankland.

Doing it for the kids, man: Children's laptop inspires open source projects

Filed under
OLPC
OSS

A network of developers who work on much of the most commonly used software on Linux is passing up multi-core monsters with gigabytes of RAM to target their code to a design of which only 500 prototype boards now exist: the "Children's Machine 1" from the One Laptop Per Child project.

Automate Banshee Updates

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

Okay, time to finish off the “How to Update Banshee” posts. The Mighty Aaron Bockover has put up a repository for SLED10 and another for openSUSE 10.2. If you followed my previous steps on buidling banshee from source, you have to uninstall all the packages before adding these. This is as easy as using “sudo make uninstall.”

VCs' Open Source Attraction

Filed under
OSS

As VCs continue to demonstrate their willingness to fund young open source companies, many closed source companies are trying to adopt an open source-type business model just to be more appealing to those with the cash. A lot of the startups recognize the fact that it's difficult to get into the software business if you don't have an open source angle.

Revenue or Revolution: The Linux Explosion

Filed under
Linux

In recent months, there is one thing that’s on my mind - open source revenue vs. revolution. Seriously, while the revolution is well underway within the open source community, one has to question which of these two previously mentioned ideologies will, in the end, be the deciding factor on the future of software and OS' as a whole.

A guide to building your music library the cool way

Filed under
HowTos

In this article, we’ll explore the three most effective ways to obtain music without paying through your nose or losing access to your music. If you’re fed up with the recording studios, just by reading this you’ll be making them soil their pants.

Firefox 2.0: The Honda Civic of Web Browsers

Filed under
Moz/FF

Tapping once again into the collective talents of the open-source community, the new Firefox 2.0 Web browser is unambiguously a success. This said, it breaks little genuinely new ground.

Installing Asterisk from standard packages on Ubuntu LTS (6.06)

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu includes packages for Asterisk and Zaptel, but they may not be up to date, or the newer packages may only be available in newer Ubuntu releases. With this procedure you can install the latest version of Asterisk by compiling from source.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 175

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • News: Fedora Core 6, Ubuntu upgrade woes, Oracle Linux, Patrick Volkerding, Yellow Dog Linux 5.0
  • First looks: Elive 0.5

  • Released last week: Fedora Core 6, Ubuntu 6.10
  • Upcoming releases: NetBSD 3.1, OpenBSD 4.0
  • New addition: Oracle Unbreakable Linux
  • New distributions: ArtistX, Emanon Linux, Majilux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Dusting Off the Hat – Revisiting Fedora

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The last time I reviewed Fedora (Core 5, here) I was left a bit annoyed overall. Frustrated, as idealism had gotten the best of what I was hoping to be a solid distribution. This time around I'm hoping Fedora will be on the right path.

The Fifth Annual Southern California Linux Expo is Coming

Filed under
Linux

Bigger and Badder! The Fifth Annual Southern California Linux Expo is coming! It will be February 10-11, 2007, at The Westin Los Angeles Airport.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux File Server Guide

Linux file servers play an essential role. The ability to share files is a basic expectation with any modern operating system in the workplace. When using one of the popular Linux distributions, you have a few different file sharing options to choose from. Some of them are simple but not that secure. Others are highly secure, yet require some know-how to set up initially. Once set up on a dedicated machine, you can utilize these file sharing technologies on a dedicated file server. This article will address these technologies and provide some guidance on choosing one option over another. Read more

Today in Techrights

Security: SSL, Microsoft Windows TCO, Security Breach Detection and SIM Hijackers

  • Why Does Google Chrome Say Websites Are “Not Secure”?
    Starting with Chrome 68, Google Chrome labels all non-HTTPS websites as “Not Secure.” Nothing else has changed—HTTP websites are just as secure as they’ve always been—but Google is giving the entire web a shove towards secure, encrypted connections.
  • Biggest Voting Machine Maker Admits -- Ooops -- That It Installed Remote Access Software After First Denying It [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO]
    We've been covering the mess that is electronic voting machines for nearly two decades on Techdirt, and the one thing that still flummoxes me is how are they so bad at this after all these years? And I don't mean "bad at security" -- though, that's part of it -- but I really mean "bad at understanding how insecure their machines really are." For a while everyone focused on Diebold, but Election Systems and Software (ES&S) has long been a bigger player in the space, and had just as many issues. It just got less attention. There was even a brief period of time where ES&S bought what remained of Diebold's flailing e-voting business before having to sell off the assets to deal with an antitrust lawsuit by the DOJ. What's incredible, though, is that every credible computer security person has said that it is literally impossible to build a secure fully electronic voting system -- and if you must have one at all, it must have a printed paper audit trail and not be accessible from the internet. Now, as Kim Zetter at Motherboard has reported, ES&S -- under questioning from Senator Ron Wyden -- has now admitted that it installed remote access software on its voting machines, something the company had vehemently denied to the same reporter just a few months ago.
  • Bringing cybersecurity to the DNC [Ed: Microsoft Windows TCO. Microsoft Exchange was used.]
    When Raffi Krikorian joined the Democratic National Committee (DNC) as chief technology officer, the party was still reeling from its devastating loss in 2016 — and the stunning cyberattacks that resulted in high-level officials’ emails being embarrassingly leaked online.
  • Getting Started with Successful Security Breach Detection
    Organizations historically believed that security software and tools were effective at protecting them from hackers. Today, this is no longer the case, as modern businesses are now connected in a digital global supply ecosystem with a web of connections to customers and suppliers. Often, organizations are attacked as part of a larger attack on one of their customers or suppliers. They represent low hanging fruit for hackers, as many organizations have not invested in operationalizing security breach detection. As this new reality takes hold in the marketplace, many will be tempted to invest in new technology tools to plug the perceived security hole and move on with their current activities. However, this approach is doomed to fail. Security is not a "set it and forget it" type of thing. Defending an organization from a breach requires a careful balance of tools and operational practices -- operational practices being the more important element.
  • The SIM Hijackers

    By hijacking Rachel’s phone number, the hackers were able to seize not only Rachel’s Instagram, but her Amazon, Ebay, Paypal, Netflix, and Hulu accounts too. None of the security measures Rachel took to secure some of those accounts, including two-factor authentication, mattered once the hackers took control of her phone number.

GNU/Linux Desktops/Laptops and Windows Spying

  • Changes [Pop!_OS]

    For the last 12 years, my main development machine has been a Mac. As of last week, it’s a Dell XPS 13 running Pop!_OS 18.04.

    [...]

    Take note: this is the first operating system I’ve used that is simpler, more elegant, and does certain things better than macOS.

  • System76 Opens Manufacturing Facility to Build Linux Laptops
    As it turns out, System76 is making the transition from a Linux-based computer seller, into a complete Linux-based computer manufacturer. The Twitter photos are from their new manufacturing facility. This means that System76 will no longer be slapping their logo on other company’s laptops and shipping them out, but making their own in-house laptops for consumers.
  • Extension adding Windows Timeline support to third-party browsers should have raised more privacy questions
    Windows Timeline is a unified activity history explorer that received a prominent placement next to the Start menu button in Windows 10 earlier this year. You can see all your activities including your web browser history and app activity across all your Windows devices in one place; and pickup and resume activities you were doing on other devices. This is a useful and cool feature, but it’s also a privacy nightmare. You may have read about a cool new browser extension that adds your web browsing history from third-party web browsers — including Firefox, Google Chrome, Vivaldi, and others — to Windows Timeline. The extension attracted some media attention from outlets like MSPoweruser, Neowin, The Verge, and Windows Central.