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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Mobile Linux computing coding contest underway

Filed under
Linux

A contest to create applications and find bugs in a mobile "Linux desktop server" is underway. Realm Systems will award $50,000 for the best of show.

Where do business decisions end and blackmail begin?

Filed under
Linux

Microsoft is again, treading on thin ice. It may just give way this time. The weight of this pending action may prove to be too much.

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Azureus: A Better Way to BitTorrent

Filed under
Software

BitTorrent has become one of the most widely used apps on the Internet — so popular, in fact, that it’s estimated that over 33% of all Internet traffic is now generated by BitTorrent. 33%!

The vendor mafia's Linux vendetta

Filed under
Linux

For all the arguments against Microsoft and its anti-competitive practices, the one thing that really holds Linux back is the complete, embarrassing and possibly negligent support for it by vendors.

Run With The Big Dogs On Chubby Puppy Linux

Filed under
Reviews

Chubby Puppy Linux "fills out" the regular Puppy Linux release with the addition of the OpenOffice.org suite of applications. It's a full figured Linux version in a fast, lightweight liveCD package.

Novell missteps not affecting SuSE

Filed under
SUSE

Novell layoff rumors swirled this week, but analysts were quick to dismiss any doomsday scenarios involving the SuSE Linux operating system.

A review of "Moving To Linux"

Filed under
Reviews

Cheerful. If there was one word that I would choose to describe Marcel Gagne's new book, it would be cheerful. But proceed with caution! Marcel Gagne is no Mary Poppins!

New Linux with an Old Laptop: Fedora Core 4

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Guest Editor Apostasy has decided to take a look at current distributions and how they perform and install on an older laptop. This article is the first in a series of many that will look at distributions such as Suse 10, Fedora Core 5, Mandriva, and other desktop-centric distributions.

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Why Software Suites Suck

Filed under
Software

With the release of StarOffice 8 and OpenOffice.org, and the rumors about MS Office 12, office suites are making their rounds in the press again. The one thing that all software suites have in common is that they suck.

Does Slackware still matter?

Filed under
Slack

Although Slackware was THE distro in the mid-90s (which is why I always say it's the best 1995 has to offer), at the present time it has conceded the corporate market to Red Hat and SUSE, with the result that Slackware is now just a niche distro used by a very small minority of Linux users.

All US passports to use RFID within a year

Filed under
Misc

The State Department has been struggling with concerns over privacy and security in developing new passports. The struggle has ended, and by "October 2006, all U.S. passports will have embedded RFID.

SuSE 10.0 on an older laptop

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

I made a first installation of SuSE 10.0 on my old laptop (HP Omnibook XE3, Celeron/850, 256 MB RAM) for not risking my working SuSE 9.3 desktop PC. I used the 5 CD set of SuSE 10.0.

Windows Vista 5231 Exposed

Filed under
Reviews

In the past few weeks, we've taken in-depth look at Windows Vista 5231 build in two installations. The first part covered our initial report of the 5231 while part two delved into pragmatic usage of Vista and overall improvements Microsoft has made thus far.

Advanced Linux LDAP authentication

Filed under
HowTos

In an earlier look at LDAP, we set up a simple LDAP-based authentication system. We configured client machines to retrieve authentication information from a server running OpenLDAP. Now let's go further by enabling encryption and looking at how to make user modifications through LDAP.

Red Hat CEO decries open source pretenders

Filed under
OSS

Companies who violate open source, such as those who claim to provide open source but who add "proprietary" layers to the technology, lack legitimacy.

Act 3: Symphony OS Beta 1 PR1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Symphony OS Beta 1 PR1 was released today and each time I visit the site, I notice the number of downloads is increasing at an amazing rate. Interest is high in this innovative desktop system and Mezzo is probably the reason. This release brings some new features, bug fixes, and improved performance and stability. The following is what Tuxmachines found upon booting the new Symphony OS Beta One Preview One.

Get on the Internet with Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Read our article on Basic Dial-Up for Fedora and SuSe. Or start using Linux broadband with our article on DSL and Cable Modem Use.

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More in Tux Machines

First Impressions: Asus Tinkerboard and Docker

The board's standard OS is TinkerOS - a Linux variant of Debian 9. I've also read that Android is available but that doesn't interest us here. While Android may use forms of containerisation under the hood it doesn't mix with Docker containers. Rather than trying TinkerOS I flashed Armbian's release of Ubuntu 16.04.03. The stable build on the download page contains a full desktop, but if you want to run the board headless (like I do) then you can find a smaller image on the "other downloads" link. I initially used the stable image but had to swap to the nightly build due to a missing kernel module for Kubernetes networking. Having looked this up on Google I found the nightly build contained the fix to turn on the missing module. Read more

today's howtos

PlayOnLinux For Easier Use Of Wine

PlayOnLinux is a free program that helps to install, run, and manage Windows software on Linux. It can also manage virtual C: drives (known as Wine prefixes), and download and install certain Windows libraries for getting some software to run on Wine properly. Creating different drives using different Wine versions is also possible. It is very handy because what runs well in one version may not run as well (if at all) on a newer version. There is PlayOnMac for macOS and PlayOnBSD for FreeBSD. Read
more

Linux Kernel: KPTI, SEV, CBS

  • Experimental KPTI Support For x86 32-bit Linux
    For the Kernel Page Table Isolation (KPTI) support currently within the Linux kernel for addressing the Meltdown CPU vulnerability it's currently limited to 64-bit on the x86 side, but for the unfortunate souls still running x86 32-bit operating systems, SUSE is working on such support.
  • AMD Secure Encrypted Virtualization Is Ready To Roll With Linux 4.16
    With the Linux 4.16 kernel cycle that is expected to begin immediately following the Linux 4.15 kernel debut on Sunday, AMD's Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) technology supported by their new EPYC processors will be mainline. Going back to the end of 2016 have been Linux patches for Secure Encrypted Virtualization while with Linux 4.16 it will finally be part of the mainline kernel and supported with KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) virtualization.
  • Deadline scheduler part 2 — details and usage
    Linux’s deadline scheduler is a global early deadline first scheduler for sporadic tasks with constrained deadlines. These terms were defined in the first part of this series. In this installment, the details of the Linux deadline scheduler and how it can be used will be examined. The deadline scheduler prioritizes the tasks according to the task’s job deadline: the earliest absolute deadline first. For a system with M processors, the M earliest deadline jobs will be selected to run on the M processors. The Linux deadline scheduler also implements the constant bandwidth server (CBS) algorithm, which is a resource-reservation protocol. CBS is used to guarantee that each task will receive its full run time during every period. At every activation of a task, the CBS replenishes the task’s run time. As the job runs, it consumes that time; if the task runs out, it will be throttled and descheduled. In this case, the task will be able to run only after the next replenishment at the beginning of the next period. Therefore, CBS is used to both guarantee each task’s CPU time based on its timing requirements and to prevent a misbehaving task from running for more than its run time and causing problems to other jobs.