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Tuesday, 24 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's odds & ends: srlinuxx 17/04/2013 - 3:39am
Story Linux Mint Debian Edition 201303 srlinuxx 17/04/2013 - 3:22am
Story Review: Manjaro Linux 0.8.5 Xfce srlinuxx 17/04/2013 - 3:12am
Story GNOME 3 and Unity Alternatives: Cinnamon vs. Mate srlinuxx 17/04/2013 - 3:03am
Story Six good reasons to try Manjaro Linux 0.8.5 srlinuxx 16/04/2013 - 9:34pm
Story Jon Corbet's Linux Forecast, Netflix and More @LFCS srlinuxx 16/04/2013 - 9:30pm
Story Parallella: The $99 Linux supercomputer srlinuxx 1 16/04/2013 - 8:52am
Story openSUSE 12.3 review - Okay srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 10:39am
Story GNOME Photos 3.8.0 srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 10:36am
Story Raspberry Pi Tops 1 Million In Sales srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 10:34am

Brief Look: ELF File Format in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

ELF (Executable and Linkable Format) is a standard file format for most executables, shared libraries and object codes. This format was developed with a clear objective to provide the developers a set of binary interface definitions that works on multiple operating systems. This would reduce the need of recoding and recompiling the code.

Linux Stable Kernel 2.6.16.3 Released

Filed under
Linux

The third stable update to the 2.6.16 kernel is out. There does not appear to have been an announcement as of this writing, but the changelog shows that 2.6.16.3 consists of a single patch for what appears to be a local denial of service vulnerability in the key management code.

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Steps to compile C / C++ programs using GNU compiler

Filed under
HowTos

Most GNU/Linux distributions ship with the gcc suite of compilers. GCC stands for GNU Compiler Collection. And it contains compilers for various languages such as C,C++,Java and so on. Here I will list the basic steps needed to compile a C / C++ program using GCC.

Fluxbox

Filed under
Fluxbox

Here's a desktop that happens to be a favorite of mine, and a favorite of readers too, Fluxbox. Aesthetically pleasing, minimalist, slick, simple, elegant and lean, Fluxbox is easily one of the best lightweight desktops available. Fluxbox is based around the coding, look and feel of Blackbox, a much-revered desktop of the past, but Fluxbox picks up where Blackbox left off. Adding usability enhancements, entirely new features and updating to newer standards, Fluxbox takes Blackbox into the 21st century.

Running Photoshop plugins in the GIMP, even under Linux

Filed under
Software

Linux advocates are familiar with the refrain that would-be switchers in the graphic arts have to rely on Adobe Photoshop under Windows because it can do things that the GIMP can't. An important but altogether different hurdle is the installed (and paid-for) base of often expensive third-party Photoshop plugins. But a solution to that problem might be easier than you think.

Ubuntu-based SimplyMEPIS 6.0-alpha1 Linux Released

Filed under
Linux

MEPIS has announced the alpha1 release of SimplyMEPIS 6.0. Alpha1 builds on the 6.0-experimental1 release. The KControl system configuration shell has been replaced with the SystemSettings shell from the Ubuntu Project.

You Know You Go to a Tech School When…

Filed under
Humor

I don’t know what a typical college campus is like. Everything I’ve experienced at Georgia Tech is apparently not normal for a university lacking “tech” in the title. I’ve compiled a few things I’ve noticed around school for your enjoyment on this slow news day.

'Red Hat wraps Linux in sh*t,' says new exec

Filed under
Linux

"Today RH *IS* a proprietary vendor," Fleury wrote. "Their whole business is around proprietary wrappers to Open Source Linux to drive the subscription business. RH is a packager, it doesn't create JACK."

Linux & Open Source Software: The History

Filed under
HowTos

Here's an Article written by Phil Tane giving an overview about Linux and Open Source History, all from the very beginning.

Debian Project elects New Leader

Filed under
Linux

Australian Anthony Towns won the poll from a field of several candidates after 421 votes -- from 43 percent of the eligible community of Debian developers -- were cast. He will take up the post for one year from Monday 17 April, taking over from incumbent Branden Robinson.

Building a Linux supercomputer using SSH and PVM

Filed under
HowTos

If you have a couple of old Linux boxes sitting around, then you've got the makings of a supercomputer. Dust them off, install Secure Shell (SSH) and Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM), and start your complex algorithms.

Who are the open source VIPs?

Filed under
OSS

Open source is about people as much as it is products and companies, but the role of individuals in establishing the open source industry is often overlooked given headlines like “IBM makes $100m investment in Linux”.

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DistroWatch Competition: The winners of Beginning Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Linux

The first ever DistroWatch competition was a great success. Not only we received a large number of competition entries (nearly 200 in total), it also seems to have inspired great many attempts to try Ubuntu Linux as a real alternative to Windows. The winners are listed below.

kubuntu packs lollipops and goes home

Filed under
Ubuntu

Since Canonical ignores all our personal and partly financial engagement until now we have to assume that Canonical is not willing to make Kubuntu a "1st class distribution". To clarify the seriousness of the situation, kubuntu.de will be offline for one week beginning as from monday, 10.04.2006.

Enterprise Linux desktops are for real - are you?

Filed under
Linux

An expert in deploying open source throughout the enterprise tells us how to wean ourselves off the Microsoft drug forever.

Also:Bill Hilf blog attracts anti-Microsoft posters

Linux drivers for ATI Radeon X1K on their way

Filed under
Software

The current release of the ATI driver for Linux does not include support for any of the X1K series of cards, but the new driver - 8.24 - should be rearing its head sometime this week.

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Open Hardware/RISC-V Latest

  • Brains behind seL4 secure microkernel begin RISC-V chip port
    Last week, the first RISC-V port of its seL4 microkernel was released by the Data61 division of the Australian government's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). seL4 is an open-source and highly secure version of the L4 microkernel that aims to be mathematically proven to be bug free, in that it works as expected as per its specifications. Meanwhile, RISC-V is an open-source instruction-set architecture, and is used as the blueprint for various open-source processor core designs – some of which are now shipping as real usable silicon, such as chips from SiFive and Greenwaves.
  • Dongwoon Anatech Licenses Codasip's Bk3 RISC-V Processor for Motor Control ICs for Mobile Camera
    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, announced today that Dongwoon Anatech, a technology leader in analog and power ICs for mobile phones, has selected Codasip’s Bk3 processor and Studio design tool for its next generation family of motor control IC products. Dongwoon Anatech, fabless analog semiconductor specialist, offers a wide range of analog products, including auto-focus driver IC for smartphones, AMOLED DC-DC converter, display power driver IC, and haptic driver IC.

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

  • How to video conference without people hating you
    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.
  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event
    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week. Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.
  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1
    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania. The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018. A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.
  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper
    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!