Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

The unique relationship between Hollywood Movies and Linux

Filed under
Linux

Quite often, we speculate about Linux grabbing a major share of the desktop PC market. But it seems the film industry are heavy users of Linux, and applications that run on Linux which include both open source and closed source custom made software.

OpenBSD creator criticizes OLPC

Filed under
OSS

Last week, OpenBSD founder Theo de Raadt released to the public an e-mail he sent to various developers affiliated with the OLPC project in which he criticizes the developers for signing non-disclosure agreements to gain access to documentation that describes the proprietary firmware used in the wireless networking hardware included in the OLPC prototype.

Book Review: Building Web Sites With PHP-Nuke

Filed under
Reviews

The book features plenty of diagrams and screen shots (which are of the monochrome variety). While the author doesn't assume a programmer audience, he doesn't make the mistake of talking down either. The writing is friendly and commendably clear.

How I Screwed Up Rpmdrake 2007

Filed under
MDV
Humor

It was a nice evening. I started Rpmdrake 2007 "the long way" (Applications -> System -> Configuration -> Packaging -> Install, Remove & Update Software), then I looked into what video & audio applications could I add from PLF (with all the codecs).

Will Ubuntu 6.10 Beta finally make me think about switching?

Filed under
Ubuntu

I have for many years considered myself a "Professional Linux Installer". I bet there are some readers that know what I am talking about. In the past, I would try many distros out but never really liking any of them. I tried the SUSE's and Mandrake's of long ago but I finally settled on Xandros. But now, I think I may have found another.... Ubuntu may be calling me to switch.

Hans "reiserfs" Reiser Arrested For Murder!

Filed under
Legal

The estranged husband of a missing mother was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of murder in connection with her disappearance more than a month ago, police said.

Interview: Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian, The First 100 Days

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

More than 100 days in office, Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian outlined Novell's challenges and opportunities with Linux and NetWare, the channel, Red Hat, Microsoft and Xen, as well as his goals for moving the company forward.

Why I installed debian over my copy of vista rc2

Filed under
Linux

I was bored. Terribly bored. Bored of Five years of the same <bleep> desktop. The blue and the green and the supposed eye candy. I had kubuntu installed on another partition and was excited but I did something stupid and destroyed it.

The hundred dollar laptop and the Third World

Filed under
Hardware

Perhaps my cynical side gets the best of me, but when the folks in the Ivory Tower and government agencies try to do something for the poor folks, they usually don't quite get it quite right. By all means, the project should still go forth, but with the unfortunate realization that some of the goods are going to slip through the cracks and into the black market.

Unstable Linux Kernel 2.6.19-rc1-mm1 Released w/ ext4

Filed under
Linux

Andrew Morton has tagged 2.6.19-rc1-mm1. Interesting features of this release include the preliminary ext4 file system with extents. In addition there are the usual slew of early -rc-mm kernel additions.

The SCO-Microsoft connection grows darker

Filed under
Microsoft

The cat is out of the bag. According to BayStar Capital's managing partner Larry Goldfarb, Microsoft allegedly assured BayStar that it would somehow "guarantee" BayStar's $50 million investment in SCO.

Firefox 2.0 RC2 Is a Step … Backward?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox 2.0 moved closer to its official launch with the recent availability of Release Candidate 2 of the popular open-source Web browser. And while Firefox RC2 differs little from RC1 and the previous betas that eWEEK Labs has reviewed, a couple of small—and, in our opinion, negative—changes jumped out during initial tests of this release.

The slow but steady march of open-source

Filed under
OSS

It may not be taking the world by storm, but open-source still has a growing and determined group of adherents. Technology executives at two Canadian users of the technology, Pioneer Petroleum and Vancouver Community College, talk about why they chose it, what it was like to implement and some of the advantages of moving to an open platform.

Quicktip - How to mount/unmout ISO images without burning them

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever come across an ISO you want to check out but you don’t want to burn the thing to a CD or DVD? Perhaps you’re remastering your linux distro, or you’re creating a bootable, slipstreamed WinXP install or something and you want to test it without waisting 10 DVDs in the process. Well, here’s how to do it.

How you can digitally sign OpenOffice.org documents

Filed under
HowTos

The ability to digitally sign OpenOffice.org documents is a boon for users who want to make their document exchange and collaboration secure. Using digital signatures in OpenOffice.org is not that difficult, but configuring it involves several steps that are far from obvious.

Debian Etch Kernels

Filed under
Linux

This article will show what changes (related to the debian kernel images) can Debian Sarge users expect to see when Etch will reach stable. Users of Debian testing/sid are already familiar with these changes as they are live in Etch for a while.

Does the Wii run Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

Blogger Kiyoshi Saruwatari claims that Nintendo's upcoming Wii console runs on the open source Linux operating system.

Why having core dumps in Mandriva 2007?

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

Firefox was using 100% of the CPU in my Mandriva 2007, and suddenly it went out of sight. Well, it was gone, but the bad thing is that 145 MB file on my desktop. To disable the generation of the core dumps, edit the file /etc/security/limits.conf.

Book Review: C++ for beginners

Filed under
Reviews

Illustrated, colourful and well explained, C++ Programming in Easy Steps is a good grounding in the language if you've never programmed before and for the price is relatively good value. But do factor in the cost of your next C++ book, because this one will only get you so far before you're ready to tackle more challenging programming tasks.

Developers are from Mars, Programmers are from Venus

Filed under
Misc

Many of us use the terms "programmer" and "developer" interchangeably. When someone asks me what I do for a living I tend to describe my vocation as "computer programmer" rather than "software developer", because the former seems to be understood more readily by those unfamiliar with IT. Even when writing pieces for this site, I tend to swap back and forth between the two terms, to try and avoid sounding repetitive. But in truth, there is a world of difference between a computer programmer and a software developer.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Uber Open Sources Its Large Scale Metrics Platform M3
    Uber's engineering team released its metrics platform M3, which it has been using internally for some years, as open source. The platform was built to replace its Graphite based system, and provides cluster management, aggregation, collection, storage management, a distributed time series database (TSDB) and a query engine with its own query language M3QL. [...] M3's query engine provides a single global view of all metrics without cross region replication. Metrics are written to local regional M3DB instances and replication is local to a region. Queries go to both the regional local instances as well as to coordinators in remote regions where metrics are stored. The results are aggregated locally, and future work is planned wherein  any query aggregation would happen at the remote coordinators.
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Dev.to
    This week’s highlighted project comes courtesy of a community of developers who hope that their codebase will be used to foster communities like theirs, focused on education and collaboration among peers of any skill level. Dev.to’s codebase is open-source as of last week week and the community-building platform’s developers think that further community involvement in development will lead to great things. [...] Halpern made sure to clarify in the post that this release is not simply a library for creating the types of community-driven communication platforms that dev.to embodies, but the for-profit company’s entire codebase. “However, that is a perfectly valid use case in the future,” Halpern wrote in a post leading up to the release. “If you are interested in contributing such that we can eventually help people stand up their own version of this platform for their own business or society, we’ll definitely welcome that input.” The platform is a Ruby on Rails app with a Preact front-end. The company is hard at work on native apps for iOS and Android but say its technology choices are fluid.
  • RLS 1.0 release candidate
    The current version of the Rust Language Server (RLS), 0.130.5, is the first 1.0 release candidate. It is available on nightly and beta channels, and from the 3rd September will be available with stable Rust. 1.0 for the RLS is a somewhat arbitrary milestone. We think the RLS can handle most small and medium size projects (notable, it doesn't work with Rust itself, but that is large and has a very complex build system), and we think it is release quality. However there are certainly limitations and many planned improvements. It would be really useful if you could help us test the release candidate! Please report any crashes, or projects where the RLS gives no information or any bugs where it gives incorrect information.
  • Mozilla brings back Stylish Add-on to Firefox after it was Banned Last Year
    The Stylish add-on, with which you can give websites their very own style, is back for Firefox. This improvement has been welcomed by many users. The history of this Add-on is quite complicated as it was supposedly twice removed and added back before it was removed again. Now it has been added back as reported by Vess (@VessOnSecurity). [...] The add-on Stylish has been brought back in the Mozilla’s add-on storehouse. What users should know: This expansion was criticized some time prior as a user data collector and has been prohibited and banned a year back from Mozilla’s Add-on store. Owing to its notoriety of collecting data of users’ website visits in a way which makes it convenient to reveal users’ identity to third parties, Google and Mozilla banned it last year. It is indeed surprising as to why Mozilla decided to bring it back to its browser after it was criticized for compromising users’ identity.
  • LibreOffice 6.1: A week in stats
    On August 8, we announced LibreOffice 6.1, a new version of the suite with many great features and updates created by our worldwide community. Let’s look at some stats from the last week!
  • Graphos 0.7 released
    Graphos 0.7 has been released a couple of days ago!
  • Tesla open sources its security software, Hollywood goes open source, and more news
  • How Changa Bell is taking an ‘open source’ approach to grow the Black Male Yoga Intiative
  • As Academic Publishers Fight And Subvert Open Access, Preprints Offer An Alternative Approach For Sharing Knowledge Widely
    That's certainly true, but is easy to remedy. Academics who plan to publish a preprint could offer a copy of the paper to the group of trusted journalists under embargo -- just as they would with traditional papers. One sentence describing why it would be worth reading is all that is required by way of introduction. To the extent that the system works for today's published papers, it will also work for preprints. Some authors may publish without giving journalists time to check with other experts, but that's also true for current papers. Similarly, some journalists may hanker after full press releases that spoon-feed them the results, but if they can't be bothered working it out for themselves, or contacting the researchers and asking for an explanation, they probably wouldn't write a very good article anyway. The other concern relates to the quality of preprints. One of the key differences between a preprint and a paper published in a journal is that the latter usually goes through the process of "peer review", whereby fellow academics read and critique it. But it is widely agreed that the peer review process has serious flaws, as many have pointed out for years -- and as Sheldon himself admits. Indeed, as defenders note, preprints allow far more scrutiny to be applied than with traditional peer review, because they are open for all to read and spot mistakes. There are some new and interesting projects to formalize this kind of open review. Sheldon rightly has particular concerns about papers on public health matters, where lives might be put at risk by erroneous or misleading results. But major preprint sites like bioRxiv (for biology) and the upcoming medRxiv (for medicine and health sciences) are already trying to reduce that problem by actively screening preprints before they are posted.
  • MUMPS Masochism part I: Line and Block Scope

    It's sort of an open secret that I sometimes use ANSI M, better known as MUMPS. It was developed in the 60's, and it definitely still looks like something from the 60's. But it's 1,000 times uglier than anything from that decade. I've made plenty of people, from software testers at work to other developers on IRC, recoil in horror from showing them samples of even relatively mundane code like a simple "Hello, World!".

  • OpenSSH Username Enumeration
     

    We realized that without this patch, a remote attacker can easily test whether a certain user exists or not (username enumeration) on a target OpenSSH server

Microsoft Openwashing

  • Microsoft open sources new framework for Windows driver development [Ed: openwashing Microsoft Windows by pretending that when you write proprietary drivers for a proprietary O/S that does DRM, spies on users etc. you actually do something "open"]
  • Microsoft to Open Source Its Network Replication Software [Ed: Microsoft is openwashing some more of its entirely proprietary 'offerings', a hallmark of a company of liars. Come to us! The traps are free, the cages will be "open".]
  • GitHub goes off the Rails as Microsoft closes in [Ed: Microsoft will take GitHub off the rail like it did Skype and LinkedIn (totally lost)]
    GitHub's platform group is about 155 people at the moment and growing, said Lambert. And much of the group's focus is on breaking GitHub apart. GitHub is about a third of the way through an architectural change that began last year. The company is moving away from Ruby on Rails toward a more heterogeneous, composable infrastructure. Ruby still has a place at GitHub – Lambert referred to the company as a Ruby shop, but he said there's more Go, Java and even some Haskell being deployed for services. The goal, he explained, is to make GitHub's internal capabilities accessible to integrators and partners. "Our monolith is starting to break up and we're starting to abstract things into services," said Lambert. "The platform we've chosen to put them on is Kubernetes."

Android Leftovers

Benchmarks Of Btrfs RAID On Four Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSDs

With the MSI MEG X399 CREATION that we received as part of the launch package for the Threadripper 2950X and Threadripper 2990WX it includes the XPANDER-AERO that provides 4-way M.2 NVMe SSD slots on a PCI Express x16 card. The XPANDER-AERO is actively cooled and could be passed off as a small form factor graphics card upon a very cursory examination. With this card I've been running tests on four Samsung 970 EVO NVMe SSDs in RAID to offer stellar Linux I/O performance. Here are some initial benchmarks using Btrfs. Read more