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About Tux Machines

Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Best Download Managers For Linux srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 1:05am
Story Reviewing OpenPandora - Chapter one srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 1:03am
Story Meet UDOO - the Super Pi srlinuxx 15/04/2013 - 1:01am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 13/04/2013 - 3:00am
Story Trisquel 6.0 LTS srlinuxx 13/04/2013 - 12:57am
Story Ubuntu 13.04 Sneak Peek srlinuxx 13/04/2013 - 12:55am
Story Fuduntu 2013.2 review srlinuxx 13/04/2013 - 12:53am
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 12/04/2013 - 7:36pm
Story GNOME or KDE? The Old Question Is New Today srlinuxx 2 12/04/2013 - 5:29am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 12/04/2013 - 5:18am

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Mailman with Postfix Configuration

Mailman is free software for managing electronic mail discussion and e-newsletter lists. Mailman is integrated with the web, making it easy for users to manage their accounts and for list owners to administer their lists. Mailman supports built-in archiving, automatic bounce processing, content filtering, digest delivery, spam filters, and more.

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People Behind KDE: Kenneth Wesley Wimer II

Filed under
KDE

Tonight, the People Behind KDE interview series brings you an interview with Kenneth Wesley Wimer II. As an KDE artist, he is known for his work on KDE's artwork and the Oxygen Icons for KDE 4.

Stable kernel 2.6.16.2 released

Filed under
Linux

The second stable update to 2.6.16 has been released. It includes a fair number of important fixes, some of which are security-related.

Quetoo 0.3.3 has been released

Filed under
Gaming

Quetoo is a Quake2-compatible game engine, forked from Quake2Forge, with focus on security, stability, and speed. Due to performance improvements, Quetoo is up to 48% faster than stock Quake2.

Kerry 0.1

Filed under
KDE

With the upcoming SUSE Linux 10.1 Release Candidate (really, no kidding!) and no further changes allowed for it I thought it was time to release Kerry 0.1 including translations for 18 languages.

Breaking up with my distro

Filed under
Humor

Linux users are dedicated to their distribution of choice. Many new users experiment, testing the waters, with different distros before they decide on one to stick with. This is my guide to breaking up with your distro. It's written from the "guy breaking up with gal" point of view.

Publish Your Office Docs, Demo Linux, Impress the Boss

Filed under
HowTos

Got an office environment where the boss, who uses Windows, says he wants an intranet website where you can publish some Word docs? Want to use Linux? Don't want to go to the extreme of Mambo, Drupal, or some other CMS system? Here's something I've whipped up. It involves using a Linux Samba share along with a PHP-based web server on that same system.

Making the Switch from M$ to Free

Filed under
OSS

I have read lots of posts and stories all over the net about there not being SOFTWARE of comparable features and power for Linux. Many people are under this illusion and therefore choose to stay with Microsoft and pay out their asses to boot. Below you will find a list of Very good Operating Systems and a nice sized list of FREE (except when noted) software.

SimplyMepis 3.4.3 Linux Review

Filed under
Reviews

After try many distros I have come to the conclusion that I prefer Debian based distros. The last Debian based distro I tried (for quite sometime at that) was Ubuntu 5.10 (expect review on 6.06 not long after its released) I have been itching to get my hands on Mepis.

When is software done?

Filed under
Software

This article deals with the philosophy of the program development and the interesting observation, that user forums are full of feature requests. Some of these requests don't fall into the program functions as the developers see it and thus, the battle between them arises.

The ultimate solution

Filed under
OS

By now everyone has probably heard that Microsofts solution for computer malware is a complete wipe and reload of the operating system. Now, as extreme as it sounds, it isn't completely out of the realm of the reasonable. Of course, most people will argue that you can avoid the, seemingly, unending security problems and exploits that are famously associated with Windows by simply switching to another operating system. But, the solution may be a little more involved than either of those two choices.

My Indomitable Thoughts on GNU, Linux, Open Source, Java and Free Cats and Dogs

Filed under
OSS

Recently, when I ran a transcript of a talk given by Richard Stallman at the Australian National University, I never expected to get any adverse remarks about him and on the views expressed by him on problems faced by the free software community. But that was not to be.

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Get your game on with SuperGamer-1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

I spent my entire Friday and half my Saturday in the SuperGamer-1 livedvd. I'm not a avid gamer as the definition goes, but I certainly love my 'shoot 'em ups'. Gaming in Linux is much easier of late than it once was.

PrBoom Version 2.4.1 is released

Filed under
Gaming

After near 18 months hiatus, PrBoom 2.4.0 was released less than a week ago. Today brings about an incremental bug fix release.

LinuxWorld: Diamonds and Rhinestones

Filed under
Linux

"So, Brian what do think of the show thus far?"

Please, don't even get me started.

But people, this show was seriously lacking.

Fighter Ace for X86 Linux announced

Filed under
Gaming

Ketsujin Studios is pleased to announce that Fighter Ace® is now available for Linux users. Please note, that this game does run through a compatibility layer and GNU/Linux is not supported nativly. Anyway, seems worth a try.

This Week's My sysadmin toolbox

Filed under
Software

I use FreeBSD and Linux on more than 15 servers at work. Here are 10 of the tools I find most useful. GNU Screen, Duplicity, ssync, and FUSE, and Birthday.

Full Article.

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More in Tux Machines

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.