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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu in robotics competition in Spain srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 5:59pm
Story Praise for Fedora 15 and KDE 4.6.x - A great experience! srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 5:57pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 6:39am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 6:29am
Story The Very Best Open Source Video and Digital Music Tools srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 4:14am
Story ASRock Z68 Pro3 srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 2:26am
Story OSCON: Open Source Awards srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 2:23am
Story MPEG LA: 12 companies own patents essential to Google's VP8 codec srlinuxx 30/07/2011 - 2:22am
Story What is your best favourite KDE distro? srlinuxx 29/07/2011 - 10:31pm
Story Mozilla's next Firefox moment? srlinuxx 29/07/2011 - 10:28pm

Mini Distro Round-Up

Filed under
Reviews

Distributions that can fit on a mini-cd are today's answer to the floppy distros of yesteryear. Those floppy distros were so handy for those quick repairs, setting up a filesystem on a new harddrive, or just killing a Saturday night. Nothing like the satisfaction of overcoming the difficulties getting MuLinux to dial up to the internet or even boot into a mini X. Hal was my favorite though. I still have my Hal floppy. They were just plain fun!

Today we have our mini-distros too, some as small as 50MB. There isn't much of a challenge these days though, just boot and go. With a weekend off from work, I thought I'd get reacquainted with an old friend and hopefully make some new ones. I test drove 5 of the smallest distros I could find and I'll tell you what I discovered.

Sin City Making Big Bucks and Big News

Filed under
Movies

Released April 1, seems Sin City is on the tips of movie goers' and tech heads' tongues everywhere these days. Noted for using mostly cgi on AMD64 machines for it's action scenes, movies goers and comic fans just love the realistic blood and gore entreated.

Samba, Soccer and Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Since the election of President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Brazil has gradually become a beachhead for Open Source, and consequently a thorn in Microsoft's side. Amazed by Open Source potential, it could completely undermine Microsoft's monopoly, and it probably will.

Seven Deadly IT Mistakes

Filed under
Misc

Handling change is where many software horror stories emerge. Effective design and testing of processes is essential. Using the latest business process management tools makes this even easier because it allows the business process to be viewed and changes to be managed with confidence.

Spring Forward

Filed under
Misc

For those of us in the States, remember to set your clocks ahead an hour at 2:am or before you go to bed.

Pope's influence includes technology firsts

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Misc

While Pope John Paul II will largely be remembered for his influence on social issues ranging from euthanasia to AIDS, he also earned a place in history as the first pontiff to embrace computer technology.

Pope John Paul II dies in Vatican

Filed under
Obits

Pope John Paul II, the third longest-serving pontiff in history, has died at the age of 84.

Always-Connected, Tech Savvy -- and Happy?

Filed under
Misc

You see them everywhere. You might even be one: mobile warriors with a BlackBerry, pager and cell phone arranged in matching holsters around their waists. They're hip, happening, connected and more likely to be dissatisfied with their jobs.

Software agents give out Advice

Filed under
Software

Governments and big business like to indulge in media spin, and that means knowing what is being said about them. But finding out is becoming ever more difficult, with thousands of news outlets, websites and blogs to monitor.

Now a British company is about to launch a software program that can automatically gauge the tone of any electronic document.

CMS gives the public access to hospital care data

Filed under
Web

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services yesterday launched a Web site that lets the public compare hospitals based on their quality of care in treating certain medical conditions.

Flurry Of Patches From Unix Vendors For Telnet Flaw

Filed under
Security

Several distributors of the BSD version of the Telnet protocol have released patches for a critical bug that could cause system-hijack attacks. Advisories and patches have been issued by FreeBSD, MIT (Kerberos), Red Hat, and Sun among others.

A Motherboard Upgrade HOWTO

Filed under
Hardware
HowTos

Tips and directions for replacing your computer's motherboard--from deciding whether it's worth the hassle to tweaking the BIOS.

Red Hat Tops Its Records

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat on Thursday announced record revenue and profits for its fourth quarter and its 2005 fiscal year, which ended Feb. 28.

The Raleigh, N.C., company's total revenue for fiscal year 2005 jumped to $196.5 million, an increase of 58 percent from 2004. For the fourth quarter of 2005, the revenue was $57.5 million. This was a year-over-year increase of 56 percent and a third to fourth quarter leap of 13 percent.

Metallic glass: a drop of the hard stuff

Filed under
Sci/Tech

IN THE movie Terminator 2, the villain is a robot made of liquid metal. He morphs from human form to helicopter and back again with ease, moulds himself into any shape without breaking, and can even flow under doorways.

Now a similar-sounding futuristic material is about to turn up everywhere. It is called metallic glass.

Animal laughs no joke says expert

Filed under
Misc

Many animals may have their own forms of laughter, says a US researcher writing in the magazine Science.

Japanese Co. sells ghost detector

Filed under
Sci/Tech

The Japanese company that launched popular computer data storage units shaped like rubber ducks and sushi started selling a new product Friday - a ghost detector.

Former Microsoft employee sentenced two years

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A former Microsoft worker was sentenced Friday to two years in prison and ordered to pay $5 million in restitution after he admitted reselling software he stole from the company and using the money to pay off his mortgage, among other things.

Microsoft Acquires Linux

Filed under
Humor

REDMOND, Wash. - Mar. 31, 2005 -- Linus Torvalds, on behalf of all Linux users, has entered into a sales agreement with Microsoft valued at 1.4 billion US Dollars.

Gentoo on the NT kernel

Filed under
Gentoo
Humor

If we allow ourselves to think out of the box, we will realize that the Microsoft NT kernel is an alternative to Linux, that is both proven and commercial-grade. It has support from nearly all hardware vendors in the world, and practically every PC comes with an license for the NT kernel. This means: the monetary cost of a copy of the NT kernel is close to non-existent for the average end-user.

Open source to draw up ethical standards

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Consortium has established a professional and ethical standards taskforce examining areas traditionally associated with professional standards, such as quality control and project management.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more