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Friday, 22 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Where in the world does open source come from?

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay's recent comment that "open source is not a Silicon Valley phenomenon" has sparked a debate about the importance of location, and got me thinking about where open source software comes from.

FBI plans new Net-tapping push

Filed under
Security

The FBI has drafted sweeping legislation that would require Internet service providers to create wiretapping hubs for police surveillance and force makers of networking gear to build in backdoors for eavesdropping.

Cracking the secret codes of Europe's Galileo satellite

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Members of Cornell's Global Positioning System (GPS) Laboratory have cracked the so-called pseudo random number (PRN) codes of Europe's first global navigation satellite, despite efforts to keep the codes secret.

DoD releases OTD Roadmap

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Software Institute (OSSI) has announced the release of a Department of Defense (DoD) report entitled the Open Technology Development Roadmap which focuses on how to make the use of open technology development an integral part of the Department of Defense (DoD) software acquisition and development processes.

Government Open Source Conference

Filed under
OSS

The second-annual Government Open Source Conference (GOSCON), is scheduled for Oct. 12-13 in Portland, Ore. Designed for information technology executives and managers in national, state and local governments, GOSCON features in-depth sessions on open source implementation and best practices.

DEB hell, just like RPM hell, but with aptitude

Filed under
Software

The RPM format was often accused to generate a so-called «dependency hell», pretty much like the «DLL hell» in Windows. I believe that no matter how smart a tool or a file format specification can be, if you don't set the dependencies properly, you're going to hell anyway.

Created As Unix, Perfected As Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Why doesn't Linux click with my friends, neighbors, family, and others? While shaving this morning, my hand slipped off the bathroom counter and I bumped my head. Suddenly I understood...It's because of Unix.

Nonux 3.1 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Nonux, a Slackware-based desktop-oriented LiveCD, has reached version 3.1. New in Nonux 3.1 is Linux 2.6.17.3, Dropline GNOME 2.14.2, and more package updates. This distribution release is of course tailored for dutch speaking Linux users. View Here.

Review: Can Xandros Linux Desktop Replace Windows Media Center Edition?

Filed under
Reviews

Microsoft is currently fighting a virtual game of king of the hill with OS competitors attempting to claw their way to the high ground. The latest challenger is Xandros.

HP To Certify Suse Linux For Notebooks

Filed under
Hardware
SUSE

Hewlett-Packard will ensure that the operating system works on several of its notebook models by year-end.

It's Official: 'To Google' Is Grammatically Correct

Filed under
Google

Everyone seems to be content with making "google" a generic term except the search company that invented the name. "To google" has caught on to such a degree that Merriam-Webster decided to include it as a transitive verb in the upcoming new edition of its dictionary.

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Gaming in Kubuntu

Filed under
Gaming
Ubuntu
HowTos

I was able to get the Gaming part of the Kubuntu How-to done. Half-Life 2 is really a fun First person shooter. I'll show you how to play it in Linux with a little help from our friends at Transgaming.com. With Half-Life 2 under your belt, how about loading a game that runs native linux code? The Kubuntu How-to continues with loading Quake 4.

Mandriva offers online Linux training

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva has announced a set of online, tutored training classes aimed at satisfying the growing demand for Linux skills among both businesses and individuals. The company says the training classes are adaptable to a variety of learning speeds and knowledge levels.

Perl Coders Get New GTK+ Release

Filed under
Software

Programmers on Perl and other languages can take advantage of the latest stable release of the GTK+ toolkit to facilitate rapid application development.

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Test Your Knowledge of Ubuntu Topics

Filed under
Ubuntu

As reviewed last month, the latest Linux certification to go live is that of Ubuntu Professional. To earn this certification, you must first become LPI certified at Level I (LPIC Sleepy, and then pass an additional exam. The following questions are intended to allow you to test your knowledge of the topic and make certain you are ready for this certification. Good luck!

ODF Faithful Tell Microsoft to Cut The FUD

Filed under
OSS

Microsoft's pledge to provide open-source plug-ins that form a bridge between the Open Document Format (ODF) and its own Open XML format caused a stir among standards experts from companies that back ODF.

Beginner Linux Tips

Filed under
HowTos

Recently the subject of beginners and Linux has come up here on TNL and I agreed to post a few thoughts on things people new to Linux may want to consider before striking out to find a distribution and installing it.

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More in Tux Machines

Automatically Change Wallpapers in Linux with Little Simple Wallpaper Changer

Here is a tiny script that automatically changes wallpaper at regular intervals in your Linux desktop. Read more

EU Law Threatens Free/Open Source Software

  • EU votes on copyright law that could kill memes and open source software
    The European Union has passed an initial vote in favour of the Copyright Directive, a legislation experts say "threatens the internet". As reported by Wired, the mandate is designed to update internet copyright law but contains two controversial clauses. Ultimately, it could force prominent online platforms to censor their users' content before it's posted—which could impact everyone from meme creators to open source software designers and livestreamers. Despite passing a vote yesterday—held by the EU's Legal Affairs Committee (JURI)—the directive needs parliamentary approval before becoming law.
  • The EU Parliament Legal Affairs Committee Vote on Directive on Copyright, David Clark Cause and IBM's Call for Code, Equus' New WHITEBOX OPEN Server Platform and More
    Yesterday the European Parliament Legal Affairs Committee voted in favor of "the most harmful provisions of the proposed Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market", Creative Commons reports. The provisions include the Article 11 "link tax", which requires "anyone using snippets of journalistic content to first get a license or pay a fee to the publisher for its use online." The committee also voted in favor of Article 13, which "requires online platforms to monitor their users' uploads and try to prevent copyright infringement through automated filtering." There are still several steps to get through before the Directive is completely adopted. See EDRi for more information.
  • GitHub: Changes to EU copyright law could derail open source distribution
  • The E.U. votes to make memes essentially illegal
    On Wednesday, European Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs voted to essentially make memes illegal. The decision came as part of the approval process for the innocuously named “Article 13,” which would require larger sites to scan all user uploads using content recognition technology in an attempt to flag any and all remotely copyrighted material in photos, text, music, videos, and more. Meaning memes using stills from copyrighted films could be auto-blocked, along with remixes of viral videos, and basically anything that’s popular on live-streaming sites like Twitch.
  • Europe takes step towards 'censorship machines' for internet uploads
    A key committee at the European Parliament has voted for a new provision in a legislative act that forces tech giants and other online platforms to share revenues with publishers. It is known as Article 13, and is part of an updating of the Copyright Directive. Article 13 proposes that large websites use “content recognition technologies” to scan for copyrighted materials, though it doesn’t explain how this works in practice. This means texts, sounds and even code which get uploaded have to go through an automated filtering system, potentially threatening the creation of memes and open-source software developers.

The EC’s Expected Decision Against Android Is an Unfortunate Attack on Open Source Software

The European Commission (“EC”) is preparing to release its decision against Android, and its framing of the issues makes clear that successful open source software will have a hard time in Europe. In its Statement of Objections, the Commission signaled that Apple’s iOS, Android’s fiercest rival, would be excluded from the market definition because it is closed source and not available to other hardware makers. The decision is expected to declare unlawful strategies to monetize a free product, provide a consistent user experience to customers expecting the Google brand, and to maintain code consistency to minimize problems for developers using the platform. The decision is not expected to contain any indication on how open source platform developers can solve these problems that are fundamental to their success. Read more

Google, IBM and Microsoft

  • Five Common Chromebook Myths Debunked
    When Chromebooks first came out in 2011, they were basically just low-spec laptops that could access web apps – fine for students maybe, but not to be regarded as serious computers. While they’ve become more popular (the low cost, simplicity, and dependability appeal to businesses and education systems), as of 2018 Chromebooks still haven’t managed to become widely accepted as a Windows/Apple/Linux alternative. That may be about to change. The humble Chromebook has gotten a lot of upgrades, so let’s get ourselves up to speed on some things that just aren’t true anymore. [...] The 2011 Chrome OS was pretty bare-bones, but it’s gone to the opposite extreme since then. Not only is it steadily blurring the line between Chrome and Android, it can now install and run some Windows programs as well, at the same time as a Chrome and an Android app, if you like. And hey, while you’re at it, why not open a Linux app as well? You can already install Linux on a Chromebook if you want, but one of the next versions of Chrome OS is going to include a Linux virtual machine accessible right from your desktop (which is already possible, just not built-in and user-friendly). In sum, Chrome OS has gone from barely being an operating system to one that can run apps from four other OSes at the same time.
  • Like “IBM’s Work During the Holocaust”: Inside Microsoft, Growing Outrage Over a Contract with ICE
  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E15 – Fifteen Minutes - Ubuntu Podcast
    ...Microsoft getting into hot water over their work with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Plus we round up the community news.