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About Tux Machines

Friday, 21 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 3:29pm
Story Ubuntu 14.04 ‘Trusty Tahr’ First Impressions Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 2:43pm
Story Wasteland 2 adds Linux support in major Early Access update Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 1:43pm
Story 5 key insights on the transition from Windows to Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 11:27am
Story SUPPORTING GOVERNMENT DIGITAL INITIATIVES WITH OPEN SOURCE Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 11:19am
Story How to upgrade from Windows XP to Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 11:14am
Story Nuclear Dawn Linux support moving out of beta Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 11:10am
Story Will Korea survive end of Windows XP? Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 11:05am
Story Zicom introduces first-of-its-kind Hybrid Mini DVR Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 11:00am
Story Watch Dogs heading to Linux? Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2014 - 10:58am

Geeks and coders get support from government, corporations

Filed under
OSS

It was started as a movement of long-haired geeks and coders, but today the Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) network is now seeing some big corporate names and government institutions backing it with funding and support in various ways.

Ubuntu Tool Highlight: StartUp-Manager - Configure GRUB and Usplash

Filed under
Software

While perusing the Ubuntu forums for a way to fix my disappeared bootup and shutdown usplash, I found this great new tool for Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy) called StartUp-Manager or SUM.

Set Up Ubuntu-Server 6.10 As A Firewall/Gateway For Your Small Business Environment

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a Ubuntu 6.10 server (Edgy Eft) as a firewall and gateway for small/medium networks. The article covers the installation/configuration of services such as Shorewall, NAT, caching nameserver, DHCP server, VPN server, Webmin, Munin, Apache, Squirrelmail, Postfix, Courier IMAP and POP3, SpamAssassin, ClamAV, and many more.

Sabayon Linux 3.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

It's been a full four months since we have taken a look at the "sequel" to the RR4 distro, Sabayon. Named after an Italian desert, I am not sure how that relates itself to Linux. Perhaps because it's a tasty distro? There's no denying that this is one of the most robust and fresh looking distros out there, so that may very well be the case.

Need your space fix? Get Celestia!

Filed under
Software

Celestia, an amazing 3D space simulation lets you explore our Solar System in great detail. You can download it for Linux, Windows, OSX or as source. If you’re an Ubuntu user (or Debian) simply open a terminal session and type:

Full Tip.

Kudos to Parallels and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the things I wanted to do this weekend was install Ubuntu on my Mac as a sandbox using Parallels as the virtual system. I figured the worst thing that could happen was that it'd force me to sit down and read the d*mn documentation, I downloaded an Ubuntu ISO.

How to install Iceweasel : Ubuntu (6.06.1 / 6.10)

Filed under
HowTos

I have put together a few quick steps to installing Iceweasel for anyone that would like to try the new browser, or would prefer it over the trademarked Firefox.

Convert MythTV Shows to iPod Video and DVDs

Filed under
HowTos

If you record TV shows using your MythTV DVR, you may want to play them on an iPod, a PSP, or even through a Windows Media Center system. Another desire might be to burn your recordings onto a DVD.

Sirjavabean's ASCII Art generator

Filed under
Misc

Generates ASCII Art (both the "pure", or black and white, and colour, or colour, varieties) from any JPEG, GIF or PNG you care to send it.

ASCII Art generator

openSUSE 10.2 RC 1 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

We're in the homestretch now. The only planned release candidate of openSUSE 10.2 was released a few days ago and final is expected to be released to the public on December 7. From this point on only showstopper and security bugfixes get integrated, so we are able to get a real good idea of 10.2 from this rc. I must say, from what I've seen, this is going to be a great release.

Save time use MySQL auto completion for database or table names

Filed under
HowTos

There is a quick way to type both MySQL database and table names quickly by enabling MySQL auto completion feature. This is called automatic rehashing.

Retrieve bug reports from the Debian Bug Tracking System using apt-listbugs

Filed under
HowTos

apt-listbugs is a tool which retrieves bug reports from the Debian Bug Tracking System and lists them. Especially, it is intended to be invoked before each upgrade by apt in order to check whether the upgrade/installation is safe.

Thank you, openSUSE (from a FreeBSD guy)

Filed under
Linux

In my previous blog entry I wrote about the joys of upgrading hardware and having it Just Work (tm) in the Free Software operating system of your choice. Of course, I have not explored all the possibilities yet.

Cleanup Maildir folders (archive/delete old mails)

Filed under
HowTos

Maildir saves each mail in a separate file, it is much easier than it used to be to manipulate the mails. Everyone can write some simple script to do some cleanup based on its needs. A while ago I have stumbled across this python script that does most of the things I needed to cleanup maildir folders.

Look Out Windows, Here Comes Xandros Desktop Pro V4

Filed under
Linux

When XANDROS Desktop was released as the “Platform for Your Digital Life” I felt that they had finally brought the Linux Desktop to the mainstream. Now, I find that they have made it even easier for Novice and experienced Linux users with their all new, just released XANDROS DESKTOP PROFESSIONAL VER 4.

Gnome-Theme-Manager to Support Color Scheme Customization

Filed under
Software

One thing lacking in Gnome is the ability to change the color scheme of your chosen theme. More precisely, gnome-theme-manager doesn’t currently allow you to customize your colors. You can change your icons, window borders, and controls, but you can’t change the color scheme. The color scheme is set within the chosen Theme itself and currently cannot be easily changed/edited by a user. This is about to change.

Playing with partitions 2

Filed under
HowTos

Previously on Playing with partitions I discussed how I fdisked an SD Ram card now as promised here is how I repartitioned a running server with an active oracle database.

UWC Head of Computer Science declares: “we will completely rid ourselves of Novell”

Filed under
SUSE

As the custodian of IT at UWC, I will be pursuing a full
investigation into a total exit strategy for all Novell products from
the University of the Western Cape.

Create backup of all packages using APTonCD in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

APTonCD is a tool with a graphical interface which allows you to create one or more CDs or DVDs (you choose the type of media) with all of the packages you’ve downloaded via APT-GET or APTITUDE, creating a removable repository that you can use on other computers.

Might Red Hat Be Forced Into a Deal with Microsoft Similar to Novell's?

Filed under
Linux

Moglen is concerned that worried customers - and ergo falling revenues - could force Red Hat into a deal with Microsoft similar to Novell's and Ballmer keeps baiting the hook by saying he's "willing to do the same deal with Red Hat and other Linux distributors," giving Red Hat's base the ammo it needs.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.