Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 17 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Update to Trinity KDE 3.5 fork brings improvements srlinuxx 12/10/2012 - 5:56pm
Story Virtualization With KVM On A Fedora 17 Server falko 1 11/10/2012 - 6:28pm
Story The big PC Pro Linux Labs - how it was done srlinuxx 11/10/2012 - 6:07pm
Story Firefox 16 removed from installer page after vulnerability found srlinuxx 11/10/2012 - 6:04pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 11/10/2012 - 6:01pm
Story Linux Foundation offers workaround for secure boot srlinuxx 11/10/2012 - 3:47am
Story Amarok Celebrates 10 Years srlinuxx 11/10/2012 - 3:46am
Story CAINE 3.0 review srlinuxx 10/10/2012 - 8:27pm
Story 2012 Desktop Shootout srlinuxx 10/10/2012 - 8:22pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 10/10/2012 - 5:02pm

At the Sounding Edge: Article 24

Filed under

In this month's installment, I look at a few notable developments going on in that scene today. Then, I present some specific news about how I'm getting along with LilyPond these days.

AMD Cool n Quiet

Filed under

Introduced way back with the launch of Advanced Micro Devices Athlon 64 processors was Cool 'n' Quiet Technology, as the successor to PowerNow! Today at Phoronix we are looking at the performance of AMD's Cool 'n' Quiet under Linux when it comes to the CPU temperature, power consumption, and overall desktop performance and usage.

Setting up international character support

Filed under

Like other operating systems, GNU/Linux is starting to add increased support for international characters. The support is spotty in places, and varies between systems because of differences in keyboards, distributions, fonts, and program support. Even so, if you make a few configuration changes, you can use the keyboard to enter the characters for dozens of languages with only a few problems.


Do-It Yourself Computing 2: Packages

Filed under

In Linux Land, distributions are often divided into categories based on how they manage software. It's more than just keeping track of what is installed, but what version. The obvious issue is security updates. Software is usually offered in packages.

Opera Pushes BitTorrent, Widgets In 9.0 Preview

Filed under

Opera Software will release a preview of its next browser, Opera 9.0, on Tuesday with integrated support for BitTorrent downloads, a dozen "widgets," and other enhancements to keep it competitive with rivals such as Internet Explorer 7 and Firefox 1.5.

VMware Server goes free (but not open)

Filed under

As expected, VMware Inc. announced on February 6th that it was releasing a no-cost version of its VMware Server line. While not open-source, this entry-level virtualization server enables users to partition x86 and x86-64 Linux and Windows servers into multiple virtual machines (VMs).

Also: VMware Updates Delayed

Taking On the Database Giants

Filed under

Can open-source upstarts compete with Oracle, IBM, and Microsoft? It's an uphill battle, but customers are starting to look at the alternatives

First Look: BackTrack 3.0

Filed under

Among the distributions specialising in security and penetration testing, the SLAX-based WHAX (previously Whoppix) has always been one of the most in-demand live CDs. In recent months, however, its developers combined their knowledge and resources with those of Auditor Security Linux to produce a new live CD, called BackTrack. After a brief period of testing, the first beta of the new distribution was released last week. So what is BackTrack like?

Which tech trends will merit attention in 2006?

Filed under

What's ahead for tech this year? Connect offers this forecast from tech reporters who live and work in the heart of Silicon Valley.

Is Linux Next?

Filed under

A report warns of security vulnerabilities, raising the question of whether the open-source model can provide bulletproof software.

Also: Linux Vulnerabilities Spur Enterprise Warning

Virtualization companies vie for advantage

Filed under

Three companies selling software to let servers run software more efficiently will try to advance their respective fortunes Monday with new software, a new partnership and a new promotion.

An Introduction to Video Surveillance with 'Motion'

Filed under

Videochatting and amateur pornography are all well and good, but have you ever wondered what else you can do with that webcam?

Well, thanks to the efforts of many dedicated open-source coders, any half-decent PC can be turned into a motion-detecting, snapshot-making, video-recording D.I.Y. security solution.

Making a Genius Scanner Work With SuSE

Filed under

My Genius ColorPage Vivid4 USB scanner worked acceptably under Windows, so it was the time to get it working with SANE.

OOo Off the Wall: The Elephant in the Living Room -- OOo and MS Office

Filed under

For (OOo), MS Office (MSO) is the elephant in the living room. As much as the project might want to ignore MSO, it cannot. Many potential users never have used anything except MSO, and most have to share files with MSO users at some point.

First Look: Free SeaMonkey Internet Tool Suite Is Solid

Filed under

Volunteers update the former Mozilla Application Suite to combine a browser with e-mail, chat, and Web design tools, just like old times.

Fixing Patents, Open-Source Style

Filed under

The U.S. Patent Office has a big problem with how it grants software patents. And open-source developers are ready to help it out.

Also: Patent Office takes second look at JPEG

Book Review: Linux Patch management - Keeping Linux systems up to date

Filed under

It is a waste of time and bandwidth to individually download all the patches and security fixes for each machine. This is where this book named "Linux Patch Management - Keeping Linux systems up to date" authored by Michael Jang gains significance.

Google, Skype in Startup to Link Hotspots

Filed under

Google Inc. and eBay Inc.'s Skype are investing in a startup that plans to help hotspot owners charge for Wi-Fi access, a plan that could face significant opposition from Internet service providers.

Linux Australia addresses burnout syndrome

Filed under

The nation's peak Linux body will informally separate some of its governance and executive functions in a move to relieve some of the pressure on its voluntary leadership.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

NATS Messaging Project Joins Cloud Native Computing Foundation

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) voted on March 14 to accept the NATS messaging project as its newest hosted effort. The NATS project is an open-source distributed messaging technology that got its start seven years ago and has already been deployed by multiple organizations including Ericsson, Comcast, Samsung and General Electric (GE). "NATS has room to grow as cloud native adds more use cases and grows adoption, driven by Kubernetes and containers," Alexis Richardson, Chair of the Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) at the CNCF told eWEEK. "CNCF provides a way to scale community and education so that adopters can engage faster and at all levels." Read more

The 'New' (and 'Improved') Microsoft

lkml: remove eight obsolete architectures

In the end, it seems that while the eight architectures are extremely different, they all suffered the same fate: There was one company in charge of an SoC line, a CPU microarchitecture and a software ecosystem, which was more costly than licensing newer off-the-shelf CPU cores from a third party (typically ARM, MIPS, or RISC-V). It seems that all the SoC product lines are still around, but have not used the custom CPU architectures for several years at this point. Read more

If you hitch a ride with a scorpion… (Coverity)

I haven’t seen a blog post or notice about this, but according to the Twitters, Coverity has stopped supporting online scanning for open source projects. Is anybody shocked by this? Anybody? [...] Not sure what the story is with Coverity, but it probably has something to do with 1) they haven’t been able to monetize the service the way they hoped, or 2) they’ve been able to monetize the service and don’t fancy spending the money anymore or 3) they’ve pivoted entirely and just aren’t doing the scanning thing. Not sure which, don’t really care — the end result is the same. Open source projects that have come to depend on this now have to scramble to replace the service. [...] I’m not going to go all RMS, but the only way to prevent this is to have open tools and services. And pay for them. Read more