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Tuesday, 18 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 21 To Evaluate Remote Journal Logging, 64-bit ARM Emulation Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 5:09pm
Story More evidence that the Linux wars have moved to OpenStack Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 5:04pm
Story Live from the Summit: All hands on cloud with Red Hat CEO Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 4:56pm
Story No, the iPhone 6 is not going to demolish Android Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 3:44pm
Story GNU/Linux in India Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 3:38pm
Story Efl and Elementary 1.9.3 and Enlightenment 0.18.7 release Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 3:26pm
Story Samba 4.0.17 Launches with Multiple Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 3:21pm
Story The Results Of Optimizing Radeon's VRAM Behavior Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 3:16pm
Story BitTorrent Client FrostWire 5.7.2 Finally Brings uTP Support Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 3:11pm
Story Dell unloads slew of datacenter upgrades, teams with Red Hat on OpenStack Rianne Schestowitz 15/04/2014 - 3:03pm

Criticism mounts over Birmingham's Linux project

Filed under
Linux

As reported earlier this week, Birmingham City Council pulled the plug on its £535,000 open-source pilot after its analysis concluded that it was cheaper to upgrade to a Microsoft-based platform than proceed with open source.

Is Microsoft infringing upon Xerox, Apple and Unix intellectual property?

Filed under
Microsoft

Intellectual Property is a term widely abused in the software industry by firms such as Microsoft and SCO using it to scare people into not using certain products in favor of their own. This disparaging tactic has even been given a name: Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).

Making manpages work for you

Filed under
HowTos

Once upon a time, Linux was a hacker's operating system, in the sense that only the most dedicated and enthusiastic computer geeks had the motivation and skill to make sense of it and make it work for them. That has been changing for several years, but to really understand Linux, to be more than a mere end user, you should still learn to navigate the command line interface. One of the most important skills to have for navigating the command line in Linux is the ability to use manpages.

Seven tips for leading FOSS programmers

Filed under
HowTos

Books about management techniques rarely mention how to lead computer programmers. The few that do sooner or later reach for a cliché and compare the effort to herding cats -- J. Hank Rainwater, for instance, uses the phrase as his title. Partly, the comparison reflects how much the topic is outside the corporate mainstream. However, the comparison also reflects the conflicting nature of the job. The typical IT department represents a separate culture within a company, and a successful manager must both understand that culture and act as a bridge between it and the rest of the company, trying to explain each to the other.

Desktop search for Linux - autumn 2006

Filed under
Linux

I already wrote a bit about desktop search on Linux systems, you can find more in the section Desktop Search (surprise, surprise). However, the last look at the situation in general is quite some months ago, and several things have developed since then.

Arch Linux 0.7.2 (Gimmick) Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Arch Linux is an i686-optimized distribution that has been compared to Slackware for its stability (and it's use of BSD-style init scripts) and has also been compared to Gentoo in terms of speed. Arch Linux was created by Judd Vinet and is actually a Linux From Scratch (LFS) project. Arch uses pacman as its installation/upgrade tool and is similar in function to Debian's apt-get.

Linux Tricks - Scheduling With the Mighty At job

Filed under
HowTos

If you’ve got a task in linux that you want accomplished some time in the future, perhaps when you’re not sitting at your computer, the at command may be perfect for you. At is a great way to schedule single events in the future. It can be use to trigger a command or a series of commands can be put into a script.

Spending a Week with Xandros: First Impressions

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Thinking of dipping your toes in the Linux pool? Xandros Desktop Home Edition — Premium may just convince you to jump in with both feet! Let Bryan Hoff guide you through the benefits and pitfalls of this free and easy-to-use Linux distribution.

Is the Microsoft-Novell deal dead on arrival?

Filed under
SUSE

The potentially historic Microsoft-Novell pact announced last week, whereby Microsoft would grant patent peace to users of Novell's Suse Linux software in exchange for royalty payments paid by Novell to Microsoft, will be dead by mid-March, promises Eben Moglen, the general counsel of the Free Software Foundation (FSF).

Debian 4.0 "Etch" suffers delays

Filed under
Linux

The developers of the Linux distribution Debian have now made the first Release Candidate of the new installer, which represents the most important new feature of the new Debian Version 4.0 ("Etch"), available. However the RC1 of the new installer is already three months behind schedule.

Epatec dwarf PC makes a capable thin client

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

What can you do with a tiny 200MHz computer? We tested such a computing dwarf, the Epatec eTC thin client, and found you can save big money with this box by using it as a thin client.

System Administration Toolkit: Problems and pitfalls

Filed under
Linux

Knowing the right way of dealing with full disks, or a crippled system, is nearly as important as having tools in your arsenal to make sure you're prepared to react quickly to missing files or an insecure system. Avoid common pitfalls and traps to help keep your system running smoothly. This article focuses on some of the most common problems and issues facing UNIX administrators and ways to achieve a safe and effective resolution.

MiniTutor: Shell Colors and Cursor Positions

Filed under
Linux

If you are the lord of the terminal you probably know it's possible change colors and also cursor position, or control text. Sometimes you can use controlled characters to modify texts and how they are displayed, and also for fun you can draw, create animations, statusbar, progressbar and more.

Who Is Marketing Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Seriously. While a great many people still maintain that Linux isn't quite readyfor the desktop (myself occasionally being one of them), it has struck me thatsomething is far more important than developers' ability to code, or the GUI'sability to imitate a seamless user experience. It's great marketing. Wads of cash certainly helps this, and ultimately, if 90% of your overinflated budget is pumped into marketing, your software is bound to succeed.

RedHat's response: Interview with Mark Webbink (RedHat)

Filed under
Interviews

Three days ago we posted an interview with Justin Steinman, Director of Marketing for Linux & Open Platform Solutions for Novell. He answered some of our questions regarding the Novell-Microsoft deal. Now it's RedHat's turn for a session of Q&A on LinuxInterviews.com. We contacted RedHat Inc. and Mark Webbink agreed to answer some of our questions in regard with the Microsoft-Novell agreement, with more to come in the following days. Read below to find out what RedHat believes of this "unearthly" alliance and what they plan to do in the future.

Using styles in OpenOffice.org

Filed under
HowTos

My friend Kent used to say, "Unix is like chocolate sauce. Add it to anything and it's better." I'm going to tell him that the same is true of styles. They're great. And not too complicated, either. Styles are essentially just organized formatting.

$190 Puppy Linux Movie Player for the Minivan

Filed under
Hardware

What I wanted for the van was the equivalent of what we had already working at home, MythTV running on a $300 Linux box. For $190 I had a diskless, fanless, completely silent PC with a Via processor and 128 megs of RAM. To this I added a copy of Puppy Linux.

Ballmer: Linux Users Owe Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

In comments confirming the open-source community's suspicions, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer Thursday declared his belief that the Linux operating system infringes on Microsoft's intellectual property.

A closer look at Oracle's support and indemnification offerings for Linux

Filed under
Linux

I had a few minutes to burn today, so I did what I'm sure you were doing: I read the Oracle Enterprise Linux Services Agreement. It's funny what you find when you start digging around in the legalese that governs the Big Announcement that Oracle made. It makes "Unbreakable Linux" look, well, a little flimsy.

Major vendors put open source into turmoil

Filed under
OSS

Major software vendors are shaking up the open-source market. Microsoft Corp.'s deal with Novell Inc. and Oracle Corp.'s move to support Red Hat Linux have sent IT investors scurrying to figure out what it all means.

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Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

A firewall is a set of rules. When a data packet moves into or out of a protected network space, its contents (in particular, information about its origin, target, and the protocol it plans to use) are tested against the firewall rules to see if it should be allowed through. Here’s a simple example... Read more

Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

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    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
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today's howtos

Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
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