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Tuesday, 23 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2014 - 4:22pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2014 - 4:21pm
Story New Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 24/05/2014 - 4:20pm
Story Did Blue Pup jump the shark with its Windows 8 Metro interface? Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2014 - 7:44am
Story Fedora 20 KDE, Baconless Ubuntu, and Witcher's Bad Spell Rianne Schestowitz 24/05/2014 - 6:10am
Story Knoppix 7.3.0 / ADRIANE 1.7 (CeBIT) Release Roy Schestowitz 4 24/05/2014 - 12:59am
Story The inside story of the open source PC, and how it could stop you being a slave to your hardware Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 11:53pm
Story MIPS Open-Source Group Takes Aim at ARM, Intel Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 11:49pm
Story Linux Becoming a ‘First Class Member’ of the Unreal Engine Family Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 11:42pm
Story My first patch Rianne Schestowitz 23/05/2014 - 11:21pm

'$100 laptop' software may prove revolutionary

Filed under
Misc

Forget windows, folders and boxes that pop up with text. When students in Thailand, Libya and other developing countries get their $150 computers from the One Laptop Per Child project in 2007, their experience will be unlike anything on standard PCs.

Amarok Weekly News Issue 4 Released

Filed under
Software

Late but worthy -- that's how one can call this issue of Amarok Weekly News. It talks about new or updated Amarok features, and continues to provide tips and links to interesting scripts. As a bonus, kind of a New Year gift, we provide you an experimental RSS feed, for your pleasure. Enjoy!

Float your conky

Filed under
HowTos

Just about every conky setup I see has it pegged to the desktop, immovable and locked into place. To that end, I cooked up a .conkyrc that I can use the ALT key and the left mouse button (the standard window drag combo) to move conky around the desktop.

Enterprise Linux 2006--A Year Of Deals

Filed under
Linux

In the enterprise Linux space, 2006 was marked by greater expansion of Linux into vertical markets, new products, and most notably, a string of surprise business deals among vendors. The year also bore witness to an increasing trend, of sorts, among Novell, Oracle, and other software companies to justify their actions on the basis of "customer demand."

Ubuntu User's Open Letter to Free Software Foundation

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Free Software Foundation is recommending gNewSense and Ututo as beginners' Linux distributions. Ubuntu user and member Ryan Lortie has written an Open Letter to the FSF raising some big points dealing with the goals of the FSF and how to accomplish them. We bring you the full text.

Linux That Looks Like Windows: Bad!

Filed under
Linux

A few articles have appeared recently discussing the copying of the Windows interface to Linux to ease user migration, such as this one. This is nothing new - Windows-like Linux desktop environments such as LXP and xpde have been in existence for a few months/years. I think these projects are great because the developers are enjoying their work and I’m sure that some people use their products, but I don’t believe that this is the right way to attract Windows users to desktop Linux.

Suse 10.2, parts 6 & 7

Filed under
SUSE

Beagle is Gnome's answer to built-in desktop indexing and search. The heart of Beagle appears to be beagled, the Beagle daemon. I went out earlier today to run a number of errands leaving europa on and running with openSuse. When I returned home several hours later, I came back to an unresponsive machine.

Also: Media support, mixed at best

Installing OpenBSD for the first time

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

There are dozens of ways to install OpenBSD. The following tasks will help you install OpenBSD on an i386-compatible computer for the first time, using one of the most common scenarios.

The Buzz About Aldrin

Filed under
Software

For the past month I've been building and playing with Leonard 'paniq' Ritter's Aldrin, a music production system that combines a tracker-style composition interface with audio synthesis and processing modules called machines.

Comparing remote backup options

Filed under
HowTos

I have always been interested in backups. Most recently, I have been trying to decide how to best implement the concept of "Separation". This requires that I store my data in multiple geographic locations to prevent a local disaster from destroying all copies of my data.

Also: The easy way to resize hard drive partitions

Suse 10.2, part 5: Fixing an annoying boot splash screen

Filed under
SUSE

When you first start Suse Linux, you're presented with a Grub splash screen menu that allows you to select between one or more boot options. If you're like me, you've got at least four; Windows XP, openSuse 10.2, floppy, and openSuse 10.2 failsafe. The problem with the current boot screen is somebody decided it would be cool to have the bland blue Suse boot screen 'randomly' trade places with a penguin-themed boot screen background, complete with running and tumbling penguins.

Using mixmaster to send anonymous email

Filed under
HowTos

This is a document that explains how to install mixmaster and how to use it to send email. Mixmaster is described by the debian package system as An anonymous remailer is a computer service that privatizes your email. A remailer allows you to send electronic mail to a Usenet news group or to a person without the recipient knowing your name or your email address. Anonymous remailers provide protection against traffic analysis.

The Quirks I Ran Into With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

In a previous post Nico suggested that I could write a post about the quirks and the reasons I found Ubuntu too difficult to use in hopes that those developing it could make it more accessible. I do agree that it could be beneficial for others to hear what I ran into.

How To Crash and Break Xfce4 In Xubuntu Edgy

Filed under
Ubuntu

While I stand by my glowing review of Xubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft), I have yet to find any release of any Linux distribution which was free of bugs or quirky behavior. The latest releases of the Ubuntu family of distributions are no different.

To binary or not to binary, that is the question

Filed under
OSS

The Ubuntu developers are in the process of deciding whether to enable binary-only drivers by default in their installation process, under certain limited circumstances. This decision process has prompted the latest wave in a conversation that's nearly as old as Linux itself.

Running Ubuntu Linux on Acer Tablet PCs Part III

Filed under
Ubuntu

Installing Ubuntu was a snap. Since I had chosen to completely get rid of Windows altogether, instead of dual booting, I backed up all my sensitive data, music, Word documents, photos, etc., to my external NTFS hard drive.

Hey wow! Looking Glass 3D

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Out of curiosity, I downloaded and installed Looking Glass 3D 1.0. This stuff is pretty sweet. It reminds me a lot of the early days of Compiz, in the sense that there’s an enormous sense of potential, waiting to be tapped.

Mount a Remote Folder using SSH on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Connecting to a server across the internet is much more secure using SSH. There is a way that you can mount a folder on a remove server using the SSHFS service.sshfs is a filesystem client based on the SSH File Transfer Protocol.

Show source-package information apt-show-source

Filed under
HowTos

This program parses the APT lists for source packages and the dpkg status file and then lists every package with a higher version number than the one installed.

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi lookalike offers HDMI 2.0 and optional M.2

Geniatech’s “XPI-S905X” is a new Raspberry Pi pseudo clone with a quad -A53 Amlogic S905X plus 2GB RAM, up to 16GB eMMC, 4K-ready HDMI 2.0, LAN, 4x USB, touch-enabled LVDS, and optional M.2. Geniatech, which is known for Qualcomm based SBCs such as the Snapdragon 410 based, 96Boards-like Development Board IV and Snapdragon 820E based Development Board 8, has posted specs for a Raspberry Pi form factor board with a quad -A53, Amlogic S905X with 1/6GHz to 2GHz performance. No pricing is available for the XPI-S905X, which appears to be aimed at the OEM market. Read more

​Linus Torvalds talks about coming back to work on Linux

"'I'm starting the usual merge window activity now," said Torvalds. But it's not going to be kernel development as usual. "We did talk about the fact that now Greg [Kroah-Hartman] has write rights to my kernel tree, and if will be easier to just share the load if we want to, and maybe we'll add another maintainer after further discussion." So, Kroah-Hartman, who runs the stable kernel, will have a say on Linus' cutting-edge kernel. Will someone else get write permission to Torvalds' kernel code tree to help lighten the load? Stay tuned. Read more Also: Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election call for nominations

Mozilla: Firefox 65 Plans and Firefox 63 Analysis

  • Firefox 65 Will Block Tracking Cookies By Default
    Mozilla today released Firefox 63, which includes an experimental option to block third-party tracking cookies, protecting against cross-site tracking. You can test this out today, but Mozilla wants to enable it for everyone by default in Firefox 65.
  • The Path to Enhanced Tracking Protection
    As a leader of Firefox’s product management team, I am often asked how Mozilla decides on which privacy features we will build and launch in Firefox. In this post I’d like to tell you about some key aspects of our process, using our recent Enhanced Tracking Protection functionality as an example.
  • Firefox 63 Lets Users Block Tracking Cookies
    As announced in August, Firefox is changing its approach to addressing tracking on the web. As part of that plan, we signaled our intent to prevent cross-site tracking for all Firefox users and made our initial prototype available for testing. Starting with Firefox 63, all desktop versions of Firefox include an experimental cookie policy that blocks cookies and other site data from third-party tracking resources. This new policy provides protection against cross-site tracking while minimizing site breakage associated with traditional cookie blocking.
  • Firefox 63 – Tricks and Treats!
  • Firefox 63 Released, Red Hat Collaborating with NVIDIA, Virtual Box 6.0 Beta Now Available, ODROID Launching a New Intel-Powered SBC and Richard Stallman Announces the GNU Kind Communication Guidelines
    Firefox 63.0 was released this morning. With this new version, "users can opt to block third-party tracking cookies or block all trackers and create exceptions for trusted sites that don't work correctly with content blocking enabled". In addition, WebExtensions now run in their own process on Linux, and Firefox also now warns if you have multiple windows and tabs open when you quit via the main menu. You can download it from here.
  • Changes to how Mozilla Readability extracts article metadata in Firefox 63
    Mozilla Readability will now extract document metadata from Dublin Core and Open Graph Protocol meta tags instead of trying to guess article titles. Earlier this year, I documented how reader mode in web browsers extract metadata about articles. After learning about the messy state of metadata extraction for reader mode, I sought to improve the extraction logic used in Mozilla Readability. Mozilla Readability was one of the first reader mode parsers and it’s used in Firefox as well as other web browsers.

Security: Cross-Hyperthread Spectre V2 Mitigation Ready For Linux, Targeted vs General-Purpose Security and More

  • Cross-Hyperthread Spectre V2 Mitigation Ready For Linux With STIBP
    On the Spectre front for the recently-started Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel is STIBP support for cross-hyperthread Spectre Variant Two mitigation. Going back to the end of the summer was the patch work for this cross-hyperthread Spectre V2 mitigation with STIBP while now it's being merged to mainline.
  • Targeted vs General purpose security
    There seems to be a lot of questions going around lately about how to best give out simple security advice that is actionable. Goodness knows I’ve talked about this more than I can even remember at this point. The security industry is really bad at giving out actionable advice. It’s common someone will ask what’s good advice. They’ll get a few morsels, them someone will point out whatever corner case makes that advice bad and the conversation will spiral into nonsense where we find ourselves trying to defend someone mostly concerned about cat pictures from being kidnapped by a foreign nation. Eventually whoever asked for help quit listening a long time ago and decided to just keep their passwords written on a sticky note under the keyboard. I’m pretty sure the fundamental flaw in all this thinking is we never differentiate between a targeted attack and general purpose security. They are not the same thing. They’re incredibly different in fact. General purpose advice can be reasonable, simple, and good. If you are a target you’ve already lost, most advice won’t help you. General purpose security is just basic hygiene. These are the really easy concepts. Ideas like using a password manager, multi-factor-auth, install updates on your system. These are the activities anyone and everyone should be doing. One could argue these should be the default settings for any given computer or service (that’s a post for another day though). You don’t need to be a security genius to take these steps. You just have to restrain yourself from acting like a crazy person so whoever asked for help can actually get the advice they need.
  • Oracle Moves to Gen 2 Cloud, Promising More Automation and Security [Ed: Ellison wants people to blindly trust proprietary blobs for security (a bad thing to do, never mind the CIA past of Oracle and severe flaws in its DBs)].
    A primary message from Ellison is that the Gen 2 Oracle cloud is more secure, with autonomous capabilities to help protect against attacks. Ellison also emphasized the segmentation and isolation of workloads on the Gen 2 Oracle cloud, providing improved security.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #182
    Here’s what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 14 and Saturday October 20 2018...