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Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Where It All Began: The 10 Original Software Companies srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:21pm
Story Gnome 3 got some issues srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:24pm
Story The best violent video games of all time srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:27pm
Story 9 Good Terminal Emulators for Linux srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:13am
Story Farewell to Microsoft srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:15am
Story Book Review: The Book of Audacity srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:17am
Story Xamarin Joy Factory srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:18am
Story 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 28: My Five Biggest Ubuntu Linux Complaints srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:11am
Story Peppermint OS Two review srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:14am
Story Security of GNU/Linux Systems srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:36am

LinuxToday: IBM--Orca or Penguin?

Filed under
Linux

Along this same vein, doesn't anyone else find it interesting that it's Sun jumping up and defending Free Software rather than IBM, which I believe has a much bigger stake in Linux? Where is IBM, anyway? I have three theories.

OpenOffice.org Calc adds support for Excel VBA

Filed under
OOo

As an Excel user, you may have looked at OpenOffice.org and found that it doesn't support Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), the Microsoft Office macro language. If you've spent years building hundreds of Excel macros, the fear of losing them all could keep you locked in to Office.

Red Hat Plans to List Shares on the New York Stock Exchange

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat, Inc. today announced that it has filed an application to list its common stock on the New York Stock Exchange. Upon approval of its application, the Company anticipates that its shares of common stock will begin trading on the NYSE on December 12, 2006, under the symbol "RHT". Until that time Red Hat will continue to trade on the NASDAQ Stock Market under the symbol "RHAT".

Also: Feeling New Heat, Red Hat Rolls on

Interview: Microsoft’s open-source peacemaker

Filed under
Microsoft
Interviews

Bridging the disparate worlds of Microsoft and the open-source community might seem an impossible task but Bill Hilf seems to be having some success in spanning the divide. He is trying to convince open-source developers that they can work with and not just against the software giant.

Criticism mounts over Birmingham's Linux project

Filed under
Linux

As reported earlier this week, Birmingham City Council pulled the plug on its £535,000 open-source pilot after its analysis concluded that it was cheaper to upgrade to a Microsoft-based platform than proceed with open source.

Is Microsoft infringing upon Xerox, Apple and Unix intellectual property?

Filed under
Microsoft

Intellectual Property is a term widely abused in the software industry by firms such as Microsoft and SCO using it to scare people into not using certain products in favor of their own. This disparaging tactic has even been given a name: Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).

Making manpages work for you

Filed under
HowTos

Once upon a time, Linux was a hacker's operating system, in the sense that only the most dedicated and enthusiastic computer geeks had the motivation and skill to make sense of it and make it work for them. That has been changing for several years, but to really understand Linux, to be more than a mere end user, you should still learn to navigate the command line interface. One of the most important skills to have for navigating the command line in Linux is the ability to use manpages.

Seven tips for leading FOSS programmers

Filed under
HowTos

Books about management techniques rarely mention how to lead computer programmers. The few that do sooner or later reach for a cliché and compare the effort to herding cats -- J. Hank Rainwater, for instance, uses the phrase as his title. Partly, the comparison reflects how much the topic is outside the corporate mainstream. However, the comparison also reflects the conflicting nature of the job. The typical IT department represents a separate culture within a company, and a successful manager must both understand that culture and act as a bridge between it and the rest of the company, trying to explain each to the other.

Desktop search for Linux - autumn 2006

Filed under
Linux

I already wrote a bit about desktop search on Linux systems, you can find more in the section Desktop Search (surprise, surprise). However, the last look at the situation in general is quite some months ago, and several things have developed since then.

Arch Linux 0.7.2 (Gimmick) Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Arch Linux is an i686-optimized distribution that has been compared to Slackware for its stability (and it's use of BSD-style init scripts) and has also been compared to Gentoo in terms of speed. Arch Linux was created by Judd Vinet and is actually a Linux From Scratch (LFS) project. Arch uses pacman as its installation/upgrade tool and is similar in function to Debian's apt-get.

Linux Tricks - Scheduling With the Mighty At job

Filed under
HowTos

If you’ve got a task in linux that you want accomplished some time in the future, perhaps when you’re not sitting at your computer, the at command may be perfect for you. At is a great way to schedule single events in the future. It can be use to trigger a command or a series of commands can be put into a script.

Spending a Week with Xandros: First Impressions

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Thinking of dipping your toes in the Linux pool? Xandros Desktop Home Edition — Premium may just convince you to jump in with both feet! Let Bryan Hoff guide you through the benefits and pitfalls of this free and easy-to-use Linux distribution.

Is the Microsoft-Novell deal dead on arrival?

Filed under
SUSE

The potentially historic Microsoft-Novell pact announced last week, whereby Microsoft would grant patent peace to users of Novell's Suse Linux software in exchange for royalty payments paid by Novell to Microsoft, will be dead by mid-March, promises Eben Moglen, the general counsel of the Free Software Foundation (FSF).

Debian 4.0 "Etch" suffers delays

Filed under
Linux

The developers of the Linux distribution Debian have now made the first Release Candidate of the new installer, which represents the most important new feature of the new Debian Version 4.0 ("Etch"), available. However the RC1 of the new installer is already three months behind schedule.

Epatec dwarf PC makes a capable thin client

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

What can you do with a tiny 200MHz computer? We tested such a computing dwarf, the Epatec eTC thin client, and found you can save big money with this box by using it as a thin client.

System Administration Toolkit: Problems and pitfalls

Filed under
Linux

Knowing the right way of dealing with full disks, or a crippled system, is nearly as important as having tools in your arsenal to make sure you're prepared to react quickly to missing files or an insecure system. Avoid common pitfalls and traps to help keep your system running smoothly. This article focuses on some of the most common problems and issues facing UNIX administrators and ways to achieve a safe and effective resolution.

MiniTutor: Shell Colors and Cursor Positions

Filed under
Linux

If you are the lord of the terminal you probably know it's possible change colors and also cursor position, or control text. Sometimes you can use controlled characters to modify texts and how they are displayed, and also for fun you can draw, create animations, statusbar, progressbar and more.

Who Is Marketing Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Seriously. While a great many people still maintain that Linux isn't quite readyfor the desktop (myself occasionally being one of them), it has struck me thatsomething is far more important than developers' ability to code, or the GUI'sability to imitate a seamless user experience. It's great marketing. Wads of cash certainly helps this, and ultimately, if 90% of your overinflated budget is pumped into marketing, your software is bound to succeed.

RedHat's response: Interview with Mark Webbink (RedHat)

Filed under
Interviews

Three days ago we posted an interview with Justin Steinman, Director of Marketing for Linux & Open Platform Solutions for Novell. He answered some of our questions regarding the Novell-Microsoft deal. Now it's RedHat's turn for a session of Q&A on LinuxInterviews.com. We contacted RedHat Inc. and Mark Webbink agreed to answer some of our questions in regard with the Microsoft-Novell agreement, with more to come in the following days. Read below to find out what RedHat believes of this "unearthly" alliance and what they plan to do in the future.

Using styles in OpenOffice.org

Filed under
HowTos

My friend Kent used to say, "Unix is like chocolate sauce. Add it to anything and it's better." I'm going to tell him that the same is true of styles. They're great. And not too complicated, either. Styles are essentially just organized formatting.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME: KDE4, Krita and GNOME.Asia

  • Everything old is new again
    Just because KDE4-era software has been deprecated by the KDE-FreeBSD team in the official ports-repository, doesn’t mean we don’t care for it while we still need to. KDE4 was released on January 11th, 2008 — I still have the T-shirt — which was a very different C++ world than what we now live in. Much of the code pre-dates the availability of C++11 — certainly the availability of compilers with C++11 support. The language has changed a great deal in those ten years since the original release. The platforms we run KDE code on have, too — FreeBSD 12 is a long way from the FreeBSD 6 or 7 that were current at release (although at the time, I was more into OpenSolaris). In particular, since then the FreeBSD world has switched over to Clang, and FreeBSD current is experimenting with Clang 7. So we’re seeing KDE4-era code being built, and running, on FreeBSD 12 with Clang 7. That’s a platform with a very different idea of what constitutes correct code, than what the code was originally written for. (Not quite as big a difference as Helio’s KDE1 efforts, though)
  • Let’s take this bug, for example…
    Krita’s 2018 fund raiser is all about fixing bugs! And we’re fixing bugs already. So, let’s take a non-technical look at a bug Dmitry fixed yesterday. This is the bug: “key sequence ctrl+w ambiguous with photoshop compatible bindings set” And this is the fix.
  • GNOME.Asia 2018
    GNOME.Asia 2018 was co-hosted with COSCUP and openSUSE Asia this year in Taipei, Taiwan. It was a good success and I enjoyed it a lot. Besides, meeting old friends and making new ones are always great.

Top 5 Open Source Data Integration Tools

Businesses seeking to improve their data integration know that today's data integration software perform complex tasks. They enable applications to access data associated with other applications, and also to migrate data from one platform to another, transforming it as necessary. Given this sophistication, selecting the best data integration tool is far from easy. Adding to the complexity of the selection process: early data integration tools focused on ETL – extract, transform, and load processes. However, most of today's data integration products have much more advanced capabilities and can generally connect both on-premises and cloud-based data. Many also integrate with other data management products, such as business intelligence (BI), analytics, master data management (MDM), data governance and data quality solutions. To help sort through the complex options, the list below highlights five of the best open source data integration tools, based on vendor profile and completeness of their data integration tool set. Read more

What’s New in Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS

Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Ubuntu budgie. As part of Ubuntu 18.04 flavor this release ships with latest Budgie desktop 10.4 as default desktop environment. Powered by Linux 4.15 kernel and shipping with the same internals as Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), the Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS official flavor will be supported for 3 years, until April 2021. Prominent new features include support for adding OpenVNC connections through the NetworkManager applet, better font handling for Chinese and Korean languages, improved keyboard shortcuts, color emoji support for GNOME Characters and other GNOME apps, as well as window-shuffler capability. Ubuntu Budgie 18.04 LTS also ships with a new exciting GTK+ theme by default called Pocillo, support for dynamic workspaces, as well as a “minimal installation” option in the graphical installer that lets users install Ubuntu Budgie with only the Chromium web browser and a handful of basic system utilities. Read more

Red Hat: Boston, US Government, OpenShift Route, VirtualBox and More

  • BU Spark! teams up with Red Hat, hosts software design workshop
    Students traveled across Boston to its Fort Point neighborhood to attend a BU Spark! workshop about interaction design Friday. There they delved into interaction design and explored how to develop user-friendly software. BU Spark! and Red Hat Inc. hosted the Interaction Design Bootcamp jointly at Red Hat’s Boston office. BU students and Spark! Interaction design fellows attended. Red Hat is a software company that specializes in information technology and has a research relationship with Boston University that includes educational elements. The programs taught by Red Hat focus on user experience design, one of Red Hat’s specializations, according to their website.
  • Open source can spark innovative business transformation in government, Red Hat leaders say
    The federal government, largely hamstrung by legacy systems, is in need of a major digital transformation. Open source technology can be the spark that sets off that revolution, leaders from open-source software company Red Hat said Tuesday. “The types of technologies that you choose matter,” said Mike Walker, global director of Open Innovation Labs at Red Hat. “It will influence the way your business operates and open new doors to new business process, and ultimately allow you to become a software company that can achieve some of those innovations and reductions in cost and time.”
  • Kubernetes Ingress vs OpenShift Route
    Although pods and services have their own IP addresses on Kubernetes, these IP addresses are only reachable within the Kubernetes cluster and not accessible to the outside clients. The Ingress object in Kubernetes, although still in beta, is designed to signal the Kubernetes platform that a certain service needs to be accessible to the outside world and it contains the configuration needed such as an externally-reachable URL, SSL, and more. Creating an ingress object should not have any effects on its own and requires an ingress controller on the Kubernetes platform in order to fulfill the configurations defined by the ingress object. Here at Red Hat, we saw the need for enabling external access to services before the introduction of ingress objects in Kubernetes, and created a concept called Route for the same purpose (with additional capabilities such as splitting traffic between multiple backends, sticky sessions, etc). Red Hat is one of the top contributors to the Kubernetes community and contributed the design principles behind Routes to the community which heavily influenced the Ingress design.
  • VirtualBox DRM/KMS Driver Proceeding With Atomic Mode-Setting Support
    The "vboxvideo" DRM/KMS driver for use by VirtualBox guest virtual machines that has been part of the mainline Linux kernel the past several cycles will soon see atomic mode-setting support. Hans de Goede of Red Hat, who has been stewarding this driver into the Linux kernel after Oracle has failed to do so, is tackling the atomic mode-setting as his latest advancement to this driver important for a VirtualBox desktop VM experience. Published today were initial patches preparing the move to atomic mode-setting but not yet the full migration to this modern display API that offers numerous benefits.
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