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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Where It All Began: The 10 Original Software Companies srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:21pm
Story Gnome 3 got some issues srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:24pm
Story The best violent video games of all time srlinuxx 28/06/2011 - 10:27pm
Story 9 Good Terminal Emulators for Linux srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:13am
Story Farewell to Microsoft srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:15am
Story Book Review: The Book of Audacity srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:17am
Story Xamarin Joy Factory srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 2:18am
Story 30 Days Ubuntu: Day 28: My Five Biggest Ubuntu Linux Complaints srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:11am
Story Peppermint OS Two review srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 4:14am
Story Security of GNU/Linux Systems srlinuxx 29/06/2011 - 6:36am

New Logo

Filed under
Site News

Just wanted to post a big THANK YOU to jrangels for donating his time and wonderful talent to make us a great new logo and header background image here at tuxmachines.org. You might know his work from being offered on kde-look.org or from being the primary graphic artist for pclinuxos. His newest work for that distro is on display in the tuxgallery. Mosey on by and take a look before you leave.

Thanks again Jose.

yagoohoogle.com?

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Web

Can't decide which is a better search engine, yahoo or google? Well, wonder no more, yagoohoogle.com is online. It's actually a little more than a joke as it actually queries both search sites and produces results from both in a split window browser. Kinda cool. Example.

Linux still seen as most secure

Filed under
Linux

Last year's Yankee Group TCO study attracted criticism when it became clear that that the sample group was taken from a mailing list aimed at Windows system administrators.

Last year's Web-based survey was funded and carried out by Sunbelt Software, a vendor of Windows utilities, which publicised the survey solely through a mailing list called W2Knews, billing itself as "the World's first and largest e-zine designed for NT/2000 System Admins and Power Users". In the 16 February edition of W2Knews, which launched the survey, the company said it and Yankee Group were "surveying Windows Sites" to see how they were "responding to the Linux phenomenon and the TCO question".

Linux 'not just for power users'

Filed under
Linux

In a report published by research and analysis firm Quocirca, entitled "Migrating to Linux on the Desktop", the company found not only was it a myth that you had to be a power user to cope with Linux, the complete opposite is true.

Microsoft Expands Anti-Linux Campaign

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft is expanding its "Get the Facts" campaign against Linux by talking about the reliability of Windows versus Linux systems, a company executive said this week at the Open Source Business Conference here.

"Reliability has been challenging for us. It is an area that has been very noisy," says Martin Taylor, general manager of platform strategy at Microsoft. "Customers say that reliability is very important to them and that they are hearing that Linux and Unix are more reliable than Windows."

High-powered business coalition backs EU commission against Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

A five-member coalition of high-tech heavyweights, including IBM, Oracle and Nokia, has thrown its weight behind the European Commission in its anti-trust court battle with US software giant Microsoft, the group's lawyer said.

Linux forking is not likely, kernel maintainer says

Filed under
Linux

Andrew Morton clarifies his statement from November

Linux devotees need not worry about the Linux kernel ever forking into multiple, incompatible derivatives, Andrew Morton, lead maintainer of the 2.6 version of the kernel, said at the Open Source Business Conference here on Tuesday.

Government IT gets star treatment at FOSE

Filed under
OSS

The 29th edition of FOSE opened today at the Washington Convention Center with a three-day slate of exhibits, demonstrations, discussions and meetings on IT and government.

Open-Source Security Tools Touted at InfoSec

Filed under
OSS
Security

A well-known security consultant on Tuesday urged cash-strapped businesses to consider using free, readily available open-source security tools and applications to help cope with the rising spate of malicious hacker attacks.

Flaw found in Firefox

Filed under
Security

A flaw has been discovered in the popular open-source browser Firefox that could expose sensitive information stored in memory, Secunia has warned.

Yahoo's CEO cashes $230M in stocks in 2004

Filed under
Misc

Yahoo Inc. Chief Executive Terry Semel took advantage of a rebound in technology stock prices and sold 10 million shares of Yahoo worth $230 million last year, making his annual haul one of the largest ever for a corporate executive.

Hardware Reviews for Sale

Filed under
Hardware

The hardware review world is going to hell in a hand basket, and the reasons are money, stupidity, and PR people that are too effective. Low morals on the part of many in the scene are also to blame, but they only contribute to the problem. Some are too stupid to do more than reword press releases and swipe slides from PDFs, others are flat out bought.

Open Source to the Rescue

Filed under
OSS

Friendster scales the network with open source

When the upstart social networking site skyrocketed to success, its engineers turned to free software to handle the load.

Windows vs. Linux in maintenance costs

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Windows and Linux are neck-and-neck when it comes to the cost of maintenance. Analyst Yankee Group questioned 509 companies and organisations and found that the hourly cost of Windows downtime was three- to four-times higher than that of Linux server downtime.

Open-source companies chase steady money

Filed under
OSS

When entrepreneur Byron Sebastian started his company last year, he set his sights on the business software industry's ultimate cash cow: maintenance contracts.

TV may turn four-year-olds into bullies

Filed under
Misc

Young children who watch a lot of television are more likely to become bullies, a new study reveals. The authors suggest the increasingly violent nature of children's cartoons may be to blame. "What I suspect is these violent animated shows are causing kids to become desensitised to violence."

Tiny drives set for space boost

Filed under
Hardware

Hard drives for mobiles and other portable gadgets could store up to a terabyte of data in the next few years, using a century-old recording process. Hitachi has said it can fit 230 gigabits of data per square inch on a disk using "perpendicular recording". Perpendicular recording was pioneered by the late 19th century work of Danish scientist Valdemar Poulsen, who demonstrated magnetic recording with his telegraphone.

Quake IV for QuakeCon 10th anniversary

Filed under
Gaming

For years, the fragging faithful have gathered for what has become Valhalla for worshippers of first-person shooters. The event is known as QuakeCon, and as the gathering of gamers turns 10 this year, Hollenshead states, "We'll have Quake IV multiplayer to play."

Performance Sneak Preview: Intel Dual Core Pentium

Filed under
Hardware

We recently returned from a road trip to discover a very large box waiting for us. In the package was an Intel reference white box system. The system included a motherboard built around the Intel 955X chipset and a 3.2GHz Pentium 4 Extreme Edition model 840. This particular version of the Pentium 4 contains two full processor cores, built around the Prescott architecture. So we rolled up our sleeves, cleared the lab bench off, and began installing benchmarks.

Cyber-Terrorism Analyst Warns Against Complacency

Filed under
Security

Florida-Cyber-security and counterterrorism analyst Roger Cressey on Monday pleaded with IT executives not to underestimate the threat of "national cyber-event" targeting critical infrastructure in the United States.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

Android Leftovers

GNU/Linux on Desktop/Phone: System76, DeX, Librem

  • Pop!_OS Is Finally Here — System76’s Ubuntu-based Operating System For Developers
    The first ever stable release of Pop!_OS is finally here. You can go ahead and download it from this link. Don’t forget to share your feedback. Earlier this year in June, we reported that System76 is creating its own Linux distro called Pop!_OS.
  • Samsung DeX Promises to Bring the Linux PC Experience to Your Mobile Device
    After unveiling its next-generation Bixby 2.0 intelligent assistant, Samsung today announced that it plans to bring the Linux PC experience to the Samsung DeX ecosystem.
  • Steps toward a privacy-preserving phone
    What kind of cell phone would emerge from a concerted effort to design privacy in from the beginning, using free software as much as possible? Some answers are provided by a crowdfunding campaign launched in August by Purism SPC, which has used two such campaigns successfully in the past to build a business around secure laptops. The Librem 5, with a five-inch screen and radio chip for communicating with cell phone companies, represents Purism's hope to bring the same privacy-enhancing vision to the mobile space, which is much more demanding in its threats, technology components, and user experience. The abuse of mobile phone data has become a matter of worldwide concern. The capture and sale of personal data by apps is so notorious that it has been covered in USA Today; concerns over snooping contribute to the appeal of WhatsApp (which has topped 1.3 billion users) and other encrypted and privacy-conscious apps. But apps are only one attack vector. I got in touch with Todd Weaver, founder and CEO of Purism, to find out what the company is doing to plug the leaks in mobile devices.

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security
    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market. To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.
  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS
    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments. The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.
  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict
    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach. Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.
  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate
    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ. Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.