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Tuesday, 17 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story KDE: Dolphin, Qt 5.11 Beta, Connecting new Screens Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2018 - 4:40pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2018 - 4:40pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2018 - 4:42pm
Story Games: CROSSNIQ+, Orwell: Ignorance is Strength, Depth of Extinction, Surviving Mars, ATOM RPG, Abyss Crew Roy Schestowitz 1 02/03/2018 - 9:56am
Story Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS Released Roy Schestowitz 2 02/03/2018 - 8:06am
Story Mozilla News and Development Roy Schestowitz 02/03/2018 - 9:42am
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 02/03/2018 - 9:48am
Story Security: FOSS Updates, PS4 and Media Trying to Associate FOSS With Crime Roy Schestowitz 02/03/2018 - 10:33am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 02/03/2018 - 10:34am
Story Wine and Games Roy Schestowitz 02/03/2018 - 7:36pm

Bringing a Linux box to Work - Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

Part 2 in the series of articles that details my experiences in using a Linux box in a Microsoft enviroment. Day 1:

On Monday morning, I packed up my spare PC with a freshly installed copy of PCLinuxOS MiniMe 0.93, put it in the car, and took it to work with me.

Novell Renames Community Linux Distribution 'openSUSE'

Filed under
SUSE

Novell today announced simplified branding to make it even easier for customers to identify the right Linux* product for their needs. SUSE® Linux, Novell's award- winning community Linux distribution, will now be known as "openSUSE(TM)," echoing the name of the Novell-sponsored open source Linux project, openSUSE.org. Novell's enterprise Linux products will continue to be designated "SUSE Linux Enterprise."

Call for nominations for the 2006 FSF Award for the Advancement of Free Software

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) and the GNU Project announce the request for nominations for the 2006 Award for the Advancement of Free Software. This annual award is presented to a person who has made a great contribution to the progress and development of free software, through activities that accord with the spirit of software freedom (as defined in the Free Software Definition).

Book review: The Linux® Kernel Primer: A Top-Down Approach for x86 and PowerPC Architectures

Filed under
Reviews

The Linux Kernel Primer is a top down, C biased, project orientated story of how the Linux kernel works. With a little knowledge of C and a rough understanding of Linux basics, this book will lead you to a clear understanding of the kernel.

Open Source vs. Open Standards Telephony

Filed under
OSS

The focus of open source development at large is solving pragmatic problems. Many developers turn to open source because of frustrations they've experienced in working with proprietary technologies. Open source provides a level of flexibility that proprietary platforms cannot offer because they, like so many open standards platforms, require complicated implementations to achieve simple applications.

Intel 2006-08-09 Graphics Preview

Filed under
Reviews

Making news this afternoon is the release of Intel's next-generation graphics driver. This Linux display driver is open-source and supports all of the integrated graphics adapters from the i810 to the new i965 Express. As we were only alerted to these happening shortly in advance, we only have a few thoughts to share at this time.

Tip of the Trade: Knockd

Filed under
HowTos

Port-knocking has long been kicked around as a nearly fool-proof tactic for keeping intruders out of the network, while unfailingly allowing only legitimate connections. It works like this: The "secret knock" daemon listens on a network interface for a specific sequence of "knocks," or port hits. The client "knocks" by sending TCP or UDP packets to certain ports on the server. You don't need to leave any ports open for this work, because the daemon listens at the link-layer level. When the "secret knock" daemon detects the correct sequence of port hits, opens a port, and allows incoming traffic.

Managing users in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

As you notice from day to day use of Ubuntu, most tasks are easily accomplished. But what happens when you’re ready to expand your use of Ubuntu to include new applications, or connect to a home network and add new users?

Transgaming discusses problems (for Cedega) with ATI face to face

Filed under
Gaming

It seems as though Transgaming might have an ace up their sleeves to keep existing Transgamers and maybe even win back some. Quotes from the Transgaming Newsletter and development report:

Printing Avery labels with Linux

Filed under
HowTos

To aid users in the task of label printing, Avery Dennison offers a host of free (to download) software, including a program for the Mac released late last month. Linux still isn't supported, but that's no matter -- there's more than one open source application for Linux that lets you format text for printing on the whole universe of Avery labels, from DVD covers to business cards. Here's a look at them.

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Intel aims for open-source graphics advantage

Filed under
OSS

Intel has released open-source software to give Linux full-fledged support for 3D graphics, a move that could give its graphics chips a leg up over rivals.

OSDL Signs Up Xandros To Accelerate Adoption Of Desktop Linux

Filed under
OSS

Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and Xandros, provider of easy-to-use Linux alternatives to Windows desktop and server products, announced that Xandros is joining the Labs to help drive the adoption of desktop Linux.

Portable Linux Pact Quietly Fades Away, Leaving Questions

Filed under
Linux

More than two years after touting a deal to create a version of Linux for phones and other handheld gadgets, Wind River Systems and Red Hat are parting ways.

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Giant Robots And Killer Licenses

Filed under
OSS

Maybe I should have titled this Why you should fear proprietary software. I generally leave pointing people to other stories to . . . er, um, well, other people. These stories, however, highlight so beautifully why open source software, open protocols, and open data formats are so important.

LinuxWorld Analysts Cite Hottest Open Source Trends

Filed under
Linux

What are some of the hottest trends in the Linux/open source market today? Avid activity among some resellers, abundant virtualization, and a growing tendency to mixed open source/proprietary deployments, according to a trio of top industry analysts, who helped to preview LinuxWorld San Francisco in an IDG-sponsored teleconference on Tuesday.

Also: Analysts: What to Look For at LinuxWorld

MythTV and AM2 on Linux war stories, a continuing saga

Filed under
Software

As you may recall from my last entry, I exchanged my cable box from a Scientific Atlanta 8000HD to a Scientific Atlanta 8300HD. The latter, new box continues to output a signal from the cable connection even if I have it in HDTV mode. It probably also continues to output AVI and S-Video. This finally opened up a way for me to use my cable box with a MythTV box.

The new platform maze

Filed under
Hardware

I own an old, quite customised Thinkpad a21m laptop, which I still use intensively when I’m out of town: with 256 Mb of RAM, a 750 MHz Pentium 3 chip and a 1024x768 screen running off an ATI chip, I can run pretty much all recent GNU/Linux distros around. I also have built a nice living-room warmer based off an Athlon64 X2 3800+ with a big, fat hard disk and more RAM than you can shake a stick at (well, almost). Is there a problem here?

Unix or Linux commands for changing user rights

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I received the question via email — “…How do I change user rights under UNIX? I am using Red Hat Enterprise Linux and my background includes Windows network…”

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Linux Foundation and Linux Development

  • Linux Foundation launches LF Energy open source platform
    Launched with support from Europe’s biggest transmission power systems provider and other organizations, LF Energy aims to streamline everything from system operator smart assistants to smart grid control software. It will serve as an umbrella organization that supports collaboration among vendors in the energy sector to advance information and communication technologies (ICT) that impact the energy balance and brings about economic value.
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  • AMDGPU Firmware Updated From 18.20, Vega M Blobs Added
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  • Nvidia 390.77 Linux Graphics Driver Improves Compatibility with Latest Kernels
    Nvidia released a new version of its long-lived proprietary display driver for GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris systems to add compatibility with recent Linux kernels and fix various bugs. While not a major release, the Nvidia 390.77 proprietary graphics driver brings better compatibility with the latest Linux kernels. However, Nvidia didn't mention if it's now possible to compile its proprietary display drivers with the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel series or just with the recent Linux 4.17 point releases. In addition to improving compatibility with recent Linux kernels, the Nvidia 390.77 proprietary display driver for Linux-based operating systems addresses a random hang issue that could occur for some users when running Vulkan apps in full-screen mode and flipping was allowed.

today's howtos