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About Tux Machines

Monday, 25 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story A Comparison of Three Linux 'App Stores' Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 3:32pm
Story A look at KDE Neon – a minimal mini-distribution Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 4:06pm
Story Release Notes for siduction 2018.2.0 Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 4:25pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 4:40pm
Story Games: BASH and Beyond Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 4:41pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 5:07pm
Story Belated Posts on Microsoft 'Devouring' Debian and Kali (Subservient on Windows) Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 5:08pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/03/2018 - 5:08pm
Story This Android app just changed the desktop game: scrcpy Roy Schestowitz 10/03/2018 - 1:57am
Story Fedora IoT Edition is go! Roy Schestowitz 10/03/2018 - 3:07am

OASIS Open Document Format for Office Applications

Filed under
OSS

If you ask me, one of the widely used software at any time - if you discount the web browser and the text editor - would be a word processor. But all these applications (baring the open source ones) encourage their users in saving the files in their own unique file formats. So a need was felt in various quarters to develop and promote an open file format for saving office documents.

CENTOS 4.3 Review

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

CentOS 4 is built using the same source code as the industry-leading Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4, and version 4.3 is commensurate with RHEL 4 update 3. Released in March of this year, CentOS 4.3 contains all previously issued bug fixes and updates. CentOS alone fills the huge gap between Fedora Core and Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

10 Things I Love About KDE

Filed under
KDE

In no particular order, here are ten things I love about KDE. This list includes applications that run under KDE, so I’m including them here. So, KDE things and KDE apps.

A scanner for wireless interlopers

Filed under
HowTos

Wireless security firm Network Chemistry recently released a cross-platform, free software security tool called RogueScanner in conjunction with its wireless network protection package RFprotect. RogueScanner, licensed under the GPL and the latest of three free software security modules available from Network Chemistry, allows you to monitor your network for rogue wireless devices. Release 1.0 comes in both Windows and Linux versions.

Stable kernels 2.6.16.24 and 2.6.17.4 released

Filed under
Linux

The 2.6.16.24 and 2.6.17.4 stable kernels are available. They add a single patch fixing a local privilege escalation vulnerability in the prctl() system call. More Here and Here.

Hardware Vendors Missing Open-source Opportunity

Filed under
OSS

Enterprising hardware hackers managed another coup this week, having successfully installed a version of the open source DD-WRT firmware on the latest revision of the Linksys WRT54G wireless router. Linksys still markets a Linux-powered version of the router, now known as the WRT54GL. But the custom firmware community sees this as a halfhearted acknowledgment of its efforts, at best. At worst, it sees Linksys as thumbing its nose at some of its staunchest supporters. But why does it have to be this way?

Negroponte: $100 laptops due next year

Filed under
Hardware

M.I.T. Media Lab co-founder Nicholas Negroponte showed off the latest prototype of the US$100 computer to a gathering of educators in San Diego Thursday.

SCO fails to mention IBM ruling to Red Hat Judge

Filed under
Misc

ANTI LINUX bad boy SCO seems to be a bit embarrassed about having most of its case against IBM chucked out.

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Linux Kernel Compilation

Filed under
HowTos

From time to time you may need to install the Linux (the kernel) manually, this may be to get some new feature you want, or just to see what it's like.

Opera Ver 9.0 - A trailblazer in the web browsing arena

Filed under
Reviews

I have always been fascinated by the web browser called Opera that is developed by a Norwegian firm going by the same name. The current version of this web browser is ver 9.0 which they tout as the fastest web browser in the world. Once I started using the latest version of Opera, I discovered a number of useful features which made my browsing experience that much richer.

A great operating system is about details

Filed under
OS

A couple of weeks ago I found time to install Dapper Drake, the latest Ubuntu Linux release. In the same week my wife bought a brand new MacBook. The inevitable comparison got me thinking about what makes an otherwise good operating system great. Is it better than Ubuntu?

Microsoft flip-flops on ODF support

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft had decided to sponsor an open source project that aims to bring support for the Open Document Format file format to its Office productivity suite. Microsoft however is still dragging its feet, charged Simon Phipps.

A MythTV myth

Filed under
Software

Much as I like Linux and open-source software, it pains me to see someone making a big deal about it when it really doesn't deserve that much fanfare.

ASUS M2N32-SLI Deluxe WiFi

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

Introduced back on May 23, 2006 was AMD's Socket AM2. While these processors really did not bring too much to the table other then a DDR2-800 memory controller several motherboard vendors began offering up their new AM2 supportive products. In front of us today is the M2N32-SLI Deluxe WiFi motherboard, benchmarked on FC5.

GIMP 2.3.10 Development Release

Filed under
Software

Version 2.3.10 is a development snapshot leading up to GIMP 2.4. The source code can be downloaded from ftp.gimp.org. Changes include:
- the Align tool now also aligns to guides
- allow use CSS color notation in Script-Fu
- more work on the new selection tools
- new GTK+ Print API

Linux Magazines Roundup

Filed under
Linux

While there are a lot of IT magazines throughout the world, almost all of them are only dedicated to Windows, when they're not targeting MacOS. It's not easy to find a Linux one... Here's the most prominent ones available in print.

Linux-2.6.18 Brings Significant Changes

Filed under
Linux

Linux creator Linus Torvalds announced the first release candidate for the upcoming 2.6.18 kernel, "the merge window for 2.6.18 is closed, and -rc1 is out there". He noted that the changes are extensive, "the changes are too big for the mailing list, even just the shortlog."

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.06

Just days after Plasma 5.13.1 was announced can you already see it on this new release. Highlights of Plasma 5.13 include optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance, and less memory consumption. System Settings with KDE’s Kirigami framework gives the pages a slick new look. KWin gained much-improved effects for blur and desktop switching. Wayland work continued, with the return of window rules, the use of high priority EGL Contexts, and initial support for screencasts and desktop sharing. And a tech preview of GTK global menu integration. Read more

8 reasons to use the Xfce Linux desktop environment

The Xfce desktop is thin and fast with an overall elegance that makes it easy to figure out how to do things. Its lightweight construction conserves both memory and CPU cycles. This makes it ideal for older hosts with few resources to spare for a desktop. However, Xfce is flexible and powerful enough to satisfy my needs as a power user. I've learned that changing to a new Linux desktop can take some work to configure it as I want—with all of my favorite application launchers on the panel, my preferred wallpaper, and much more. I have changed to new desktops or updates of old ones many times over the years. It takes some time and a bit of patience. I think of it like when I've moved cubicles or offices at work. Someone carries my stuff from the old office to the new one, and I connect my computer, unpack the boxes, and place their contents in appropriate locations in my new office. Moving into the Xfce desktop was the easiest move I have ever made. Read more

Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
    During the process of testing, bugs are reported to the development team. Quality assurance testers describe the bug in as much detail as possible, reporting on their system state, the processes they were undertaking, and how the bug manifested itself. Despite this, some bugs are never confirmed; they may be reported in testing but can never be reproduced in a controlled environment. In such cases they may not be resolved but are instead closed. It can be difficult to confirm a computer bug due to the wide array of platforms in use and the many different types of user behavior. Some bugs only occur intermittently or under very specific situations, and others may occur seemingly at random. Many people use and interact with open source software, and many bugs and issues may be non-repeatable or may not be adequately described. Still, because every user and developer also plays the role of quality assurance tester, at least in part, there is a good chance that bugs will be revealed.
  • LLVM's OpenMP Offloads Liboffload Into Oblivion
    The liboffload library has been dropped from LLVM's OpenMP repository. Liboffload is/was the Intel runtime library for offloading and geared for supporting the Xeon Phi co-processors. But liboffload within LLVM hasn't been receiving updates, it wasn't properly integrated within the LLVM build system, and unfortunately Xeon Phi co-processors appear to be discontinued. The liboffload library has also confused some with LLVM's libomptarget library for OpenMP support that is in much better shape.

Games and Wine (Staging) Leftovers