Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 18 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Authorsort icon Replies Last Post
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2018 - 11:38am
Story Mozilla Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2018 - 11:39am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2018 - 11:45am
Story Games: Warriorb, Ancestors Legacy, Daniel Schürmann, Unbound and More Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2018 - 7:18pm
Story Security: BT, Uber, Android Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2018 - 7:19pm
Story Security: Meltdown and Spectre, Apple Code Leak, ​WordPress's Broken Automatic Update Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2018 - 10:09pm
Story Open Hardware/Modding: RISC-V, PIXO Pixel, Arduino Roy Schestowitz 08/02/2018 - 10:11pm
Story OSI, Third Decade of Open Source, 20 Years and Counting Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 3:42am
Story 3 command-line tools for feigning productivity Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 3:48am
Story Automation controller debuts Linux-based PLCnext software Roy Schestowitz 09/02/2018 - 3:56am

Interview with Brian Brazil and Paul O'Malley of gNewSense

Filed under
Interviews

Irish Free Software developers Brian Brazil and Paul O'Malley have developed a new distribution, appropriately named gNewSense. Made with the philosophy of Debian and the structure of Ubuntu, it aims to be the freest distribution out there. Linux Online is grateful to Messrs. Brazil and O'Malley for taking time out of their busy schedules to answer a few questions about their project.

When Linux trumps Unix and vice versa

Filed under
Linux

According to recent studies, two thirds or more of IT organizations are considering a migration to Linux. But obviously any migration is no trivial matter. If your organization is thinking about migrating to Linux, plan to take a hard look at the realities before you get too far into the process.

Book review: Managing and Customizing OpenCMS 6 Websites

Filed under
Reviews

If you want to create a free software content management server fast and starting with zero knowledge, and then vigorously and systematically play with a Java based web application, then the book Managing and Customizing OpenCMS 6 by Matt Butcher is the accurate, project orientated and a pragmatic book that you are looking for.

Matt Asay: Open source and The Big Chill

Filed under
OSS

What if Oracle's and Microsoft's recent actions are not about competing with the present, but rather about competing with the future? By this I mean that perhaps both are attempts to choke investment into open source. As in The Terminator movies, perhaps it's a way to kill the future before it happens.

Getting My Kicks On Route 64

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Some months ago I started collecting the pieces I needed to build my own 64-bit computer. After the construction phase I was faced with the distro question: Which audio-optimized Linux distribution should I try ? The logical first choice was 64Studio, a pure 64-bit Debian-based distribution with patched kernel and a nice suite of native 64-bit sound and music applications.

First Issue of Amarok Weekly Newsletter Released

Filed under
Software

In the first issue of the Amarok Weekly Newsletter, we talk about Magnatune.com music store integration and security, search inside lyrics, a new GStreamer-based engine, support for user-definable labels and promotional activities. Enjoy!

Winners and losers in the New Linux World

Filed under
Linux

Would you have believed at the end of last summer that Microsoft and Novell would partner over Linux, or that Oracle would create its own brand of Linux? What does it all mean? I'm ready to give you my two-cents on who are the winners and losers in this post-deal Linux world.

Tip of the Trade: Simplifying Snort

Filed under
Software

Snort has truly grown up. Its fans watched it grow from a fairly simple, lightweight, yet effective, intrusion detector into a full-blown intrusion detector and preventer. Snort now runs on Windows and Mac OS X as well as Linux and Unix.

Open Source Turncoats Must Not Be Supported: boycottnovell.com online

Filed under
Web
SUSE

The way to communicate with a corporation is economically. It is unacceptable behavior on Novell’s part to legitimize and participate in MS FUD campaign, and to violate the very license that allows them to distribute the community’s work in the first place. I say let the big MS lump payment be their severance from the community.

And with these words, www.boycottnovell.com is born.

Microsoft May Indemnify Some Red Hat Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

While Microsoft is hoping to enter into a patent deal with Red Hat similar to the one it has with Novell, the software giant has not ruled out going it alone and providing some sort of indemnification for its customers who use Red Hat Linux.

Get top-quality scans from your scanner with Lprof

Filed under
HowTos

The key to getting first-rate image output on any operating system is setting up a good workflow. One piece of the workflow puzzle that used to be out of reach for Linux users is device profiling -- accurately measuring hardware devices like scanners and monitors to account for their differing capabilities. But a relatively young open source application called Lprof does a professional job at that task.

Blizzard banned all Linux users from WoW yesterday

Filed under
Web

"This account has been found to have employed third party software designed to automate many aspects of the World of Warcraft game play experience. Such software runs contrary to the essence of World of Warcraft and provides an advantage over other players."

Monitor your Linux computer with machine-generated music

Filed under
Linux

Use Perl and FluidSynth to create a real-time musical composition of your system status. Learn how to integrate various system monitoring data into a harmony-producing, MIDI-controlled audio synthesis. Explore audible information methods and configurations to help you monitor and manage your computing environment.

Linux Tricks - Keeping your Ubuntu/Debian machines clean

Filed under
HowTos

I tend to install a lot of stuff on my Ubuntu machines. Much of this I do for curiosity and then report it here. This means that not only do I get to check out lots of interesting stuff, but my machines also start getting cluttered with stale files, old versions and orphaned files.

Here are two quick ways to help clean up your system.

Bash Tricks: Numbering Lines

Filed under
HowTos

Now and then you want to number the lines of a file. You can roll your own script to do that:

Complete Story.

Christopher Blizzard: first olpc machine in cambridge

Filed under
Hardware

We received our first machine in the Cambridge today from the plant in Taiwan. This is one of the hand-assembled models running the browser in Sugar. There are some more pictures in the wiki! Even one where I look pretty grumpy.

Pix Here.

Step-by-Step IPP based Print Server using CUPS

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to install a Linux print server with CUPS. It also covers the installation and configuration of printer drivers on the print server as well as the printer setup on a Windows 2000 client.

Review: Sony's PS3 versus Nintendo's Wii

Filed under
Hardware

Nintendo Co. Ltd. and Sony Corp.'s next-generation game consoles are finally ready for play, and bring significant advances to the gaming world. We tested the $599 PS3 that features a 60GB drive and 802.11b/g wireless networking plus Memory Stick, SD Card, and CompactFlash media slots. The Wii (pronounced "we") costs $250 and builds in Wi-Fi (but not ethernet).

ATI 8.31.5 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

There have been speculations and rumors going around since AMD formally announced they would be acquiring ATI Technologies. Of the questions that had appeared were whether AMD would continue with the ATI brand name for its graphics processors and Chipsets. With today's new 8.31.5 fglrx release, the release notes are beginning referring to them as AMD Proprietary Display Drivers. Is this a sign of the elimination of the ATI brand as we know it?

Mark Shuttleworth: Pervasive presence

Filed under
OSS

This is one post in a series, describing challenges we need to overcome to make free software ubiquitous on the desktop.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux firewalls: What you need to know about iptables and firewalld

A firewall is a set of rules. When a data packet moves into or out of a protected network space, its contents (in particular, information about its origin, target, and the protocol it plans to use) are tested against the firewall rules to see if it should be allowed through. Here’s a simple example... Read more

Mozilla: Firefox GCC/LLVM Clang Dilemma, September 2018 CA Communication and CfP

  • Fedora Firefox – GCC/CLANG dilemma
    After reading Mike’s blog post about official Mozilla Firefox switch to LLVM Clang, I was wondering if we should also use that setup for official Fedora Firefox binaries. The numbers look strong but as Honza Hubicka mentioned, Mozilla uses pretty ancient GCC6 to create binaries and it’s not very fair to compare it with up-to date LLVM Clang 6. Also if I’m reading the mozilla bug correctly the PGO/LTO is not yet enabled for Linux, only plain optimized builds are used for now…which means the transition at Mozilla is not so far than I expected.
  • September 2018 CA Communication
    Mozilla has sent a CA Communication to inform Certification Authorities (CAs) who have root certificates included in Mozilla’s program about current events relevant to their membership in our program and to remind them of upcoming deadlines. This CA Communication has been emailed to the Primary Point of Contact (POC) and an email alias for each CA in Mozilla’s program, and they have been asked to respond to the following 7 action items:
  • Emily Dunham: CFP tricks 1
    Some strategies I’ve recommended in the past for dealing with this include looking at the conference’s marketing materials to imagine who they would interest, and examining the abstracts of past years’ talks.

today's howtos

Security: Quantum Computing and Cryptography, Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Container

  • Quantum Computing and Cryptography
    Quantum computing is a new way of computing -- one that could allow humankind to perform computations that are simply impossible using today's computing technologies. It allows for very fast searching, something that would break some of the encryption algorithms we use today. And it allows us to easily factor large numbers, something that would break the RSA cryptosystem for any key length. This is why cryptographers are hard at work designing and analyzing "quantum-resistant" public-key algorithms. Currently, quantum computing is too nascent for cryptographers to be sure of what is secure and what isn't. But even assuming aliens have developed the technology to its full potential, quantum computing doesn't spell the end of the world for cryptography. Symmetric cryptography is easy to make quantum-resistant, and we're working on quantum-resistant public-key algorithms. If public-key cryptography ends up being a temporary anomaly based on our mathematical knowledge and computational ability, we'll still survive. And if some inconceivable alien technology can break all of cryptography, we still can have secrecy based on information theory -- albeit with significant loss of capability. At its core, cryptography relies on the mathematical quirk that some things are easier to do than to undo. Just as it's easier to smash a plate than to glue all the pieces back together, it's much easier to multiply two prime numbers together to obtain one large number than it is to factor that large number back into two prime numbers. Asymmetries of this kind -- one-way functions and trap-door one-way functions -- underlie all of cryptography.
  • This New CSS Attack Restarts iPhones & Freezes Macs
  • Time to Rebuild Alpine Linux Docker Containers After Package Manager Patch
  • GrrCon 2018 Augusta15 Automation and Open Source Turning the Tide on Attackers John Grigg