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Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Windows of opportunity for Nepali computing

Filed under
OS

For the first time non-English speaking Nepalis who were excluded can now use the computer not just for word processing but for database, spreadsheets, layout, inernet and email also. And they have two alternatives to choose from: Windows XP or Linux.

Sun to make processor specs open source

Filed under
Hardware

AFTER opening up the source code of its Solaris operating system and Solaris Enterprise System, Sun Microsystems Inc said it will publish the full specifications of the design of its UltraSparc T1 processor under an open source licence around March next year.

New Linux Nvidia drivers: v1.0-8178

Filed under
Software

Linux Display Driver - IA32 & AMD64/EM64T

Version: 1.0-8178
Operating System: Linux
Release Date: December 22, 2005

Top Distros of 2005

Filed under
Linux
-s

2005 has been an exciting year on the Linux distribution front. For some of us, every year is an exciting year in Linux, but 2005 was undoubtedly a banner year for open source and Linux to be sure. We've seen a lot of technological progress as well as some philosophical, personnel, and directional changes. I think it's only fitting to look at some of Tuxmachines' Top Distro Picks of 2005.

Nessus 3.0: The End of the Age of Open-Source Innocence?

Filed under
OSS

The recent licensing changes affect a broad spectrum of users, including corporations, the open-source community, and even businesses using services that use Nessus. So what exactly does this mean for open source? Is it the end of the age of innocence? What options do interested parties have going forward?

Linux Dies Under Microsoft's Open Document standard

Filed under
Linux

None of us should focus on open XML wrappers for document formats. Instead, we should be concerned with what goes inside of those wrappers, because if Microsoft is allowed to go forward with its standard, they win and the world loses.

EU Threatens Microsoft With $2.4 Million Daily Fine

Filed under
Microsoft

The European Union threatened to fine Microsoft Corp., the world's largest software maker, as much as 2 million euros ($2.4 million) a day for failing to comply with a 2004 antitrust order. Microsoft called the statement ``unjustified.'

Using a liveCD as your Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Many liveCD distros can be used as a day to day desktop without ever installing them to your hard drive. Huh? Wait a minute, everyone installs the OS to a hard disk! Well yes, that's the way it has always been done, but I am not sure why we should continue in that direction... "ah, but I was so much older then, I'm younger than that now."

SCO's Unix slide continues in Q4

Filed under
Misc

In the fourth quarter, SCO pulled in $8.5m, which is a sharp drop from the $10.1m in revenue reported in the same quarter last year. "This decrease in revenue was primarily due to a decrease in Unix revenue as a result of continued competitive pressure on the company's Unix products and services," SCO said.

Recovering deleted /etc/shadow password file

Filed under
HowTos

Even if you boot in single user mode it will ask root password for maintenance, and just imagine you do not have a backup of /etc/shadow file. How will you fix such problem in a production environment where time is critical factor? Relax here I will explain how to recover deleted /etc/shadow file in five easy steps. It will take around 10 min. to fix problem.

UPDATE - The top 10 stories of 2005

Midway through the decade, new pricing and business models championed by relative upstarts such as Google Inc. and Salesforce.com Inc. are forcing established players to reinvent themselves. Meanwhile, old-line companies that have failed to meet the challenges of the new millennium are cleaning house, sometimes starting with the chief executive. Here, not necessarily in order of importance, are the IDG News Service's pick of the top stories of the year.

XGL - Realistically

Filed under
Software

Yes it would be nice if X.org could use OpenGL directly for it's display and composition, but to date, nobody has made this possible. Is it wrong for a business to make it so? Since when does developing software for GNU products mean that they aren't allowed to do it privately? If Novell is developing XGL behind closed doors, and paying the developers to build it... Where's the problem?

Ping: ICMP vs. ARP

Filed under
HowTos

Network and system administrators are well-versed in using the ping utility for troubleshooting purposes, but where do you turn when ping doesn't do the trick?

X11R6.9 and X11R7.0 Officially Released

Filed under
Software

The first major version release of the X Window System in more than a decade, X11R7.0 is the first release of the complete modularized and autotooled source code base for the X Window System. X11R6.9, its companion release, contains identical features, and uses the exact same source code as X11R7.0, but with the traditional imake build system.

A sneaky Linux present for a Windows-using friend

Filed under
Linux

Want a really, really sneaky way to get your Windows loyalist friends to give Linux a try? Boy, does Chris Ward, an IBM software engineer, have an idea for you!

MAKING YOUR KDE LOOK LIKE A MAC OS X

Filed under
HowTos

Many people are interested in getting their linux or BSD desktop interface to look as much like Apple's very successful OS X gui as possible. Here is a step by step method for doing so on the KDE desktop environment.

Why Samba is one of my favorite Linux apps

Filed under
Software

One of my favorite open-source applications is Samba. For me, it, and not Apache, is the Linux "killer" server app that I use all the time.

Multi-Booting the Solaris 10 OS, Linux, and Microsoft Windows on a Laptop

Filed under
HowTos

As an intern working for Sun Microsystems, one of my first projects was to configure my laptop to multi-boot the Solaris Operating System, Linux, and Microsoft Windows. It sounded very exciting but daunting. However, as I went along, it proved to be a fairly easy exercise. These are the steps it takes to configure a system for multi-boot:

A Firefox for music?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Lord's new five-person company, the ambitiously named Pioneers of the Inevitable, is building a piece of digital-music software called "Songbird," based on much of the same underlying open-source technology as the Firefox Web browser.

Sun: No Rush to Open Software

Filed under
OSS

Those who hope Sun Microsystems Inc. will open-source all of its software products anytime soon are in for a big disappointment.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

today's howtos

Software: Audacity, Geary, GNOME Photos, Business Apps, Mir, Nix, KubeVirt, Top Projects and Apoxi

  • Audacity 2.2.2 Released with a Stack of New Features & Improvements
    This update also builds upon the major changes introduced in the release of Audacity 2.2.0 last year, as well that of the minor 2.2.1 update earlier this year.
  • Geary Email Client Mails Out a Bug Fix Update
    A new version of the Geary email client for Linux desktops is available to download. Although a (relative) minor update when compared to the huge Geary 0.12 release last year, Geary 0.12.1 is worthwhile. The update solves a stack of crashes and server compatibility issues, while also updating translations in the interface and user manual to ensure as many people can use Geary as possible.
  • GNOME Photos – An Elegant Alternative for Organizing and Sharing Photos
    How many GNU/Linux photo managers do you know have a beautiful UI for browsing photos and organizing them into collections coupled with inbuilt editing tools and cloud integration? This one goes by the name of GNOME Photos. GNOME Photos is a simple and yet elegant photo management app with which you can organize, share, and intuitively edit your photos on your Linux workstation. It features a file manager-like environment for easy navigation and cloud integration via GNOME Online Accounts.
  • Linux Means Business – Best Free Business Apps
    Let’s deal with the issue of cost up front. Every single application featured in this article is available to download without payment. This, in itself, helps to keep IT costs within a tight budget. And cost can be a very important driver when seeking an IT solution for firms – particularly for freelancers, entrepreneurs, start-ups, small businesses, and educational establishments. Naturally, these types of people and organizations will have some sort of IT budget. From a business perspective, open source business applications won’t necessarily be zero cost. Using unfamiliar software entails training costs for a firm — the costs are not limited to time itself. And then there’s the expense of obtaining support for the software, or even hiring development time to customize certain aspects of the software to add additional functionality. Off-the-shelf software is unlikely to completely address a company’s needs. But if a proprietary solution is sought, it’s likely that this development will be more expensive. It is sometimes thought that Linux software cannot rival Microsoft applications in a commercial setting because the strength of Linux comes from its price. In fact, Linux’s strength derives from other considerations such as flexibility, stability, security, cutting-edge technology, and ease of use. Additionally, the virtues of open source software are invaluable to commercial organizations whatever their size. With full access to source code, companies can easily develop extensions to the software, tailor made to their own specific needs and requirements. Moreover they are not reliant on the goodwill of a single vendor in order to do business: Linux is about freedom and choice and that is just as important to an organisation as to an individual.
  • Mir's Wayland Support Will Now Let You Drag Around Windows
    I was surprised to learn that up until this week, Mir's initial Wayland support didn't allow for windows of Wayland clients to be moved around the screen. Fortunately, that has now been resolved with allowing window movement to be initiated by Wayland clients running on Mir. Now you can enjoy Qt, GTK apps, and even the Weston Terminal to be moved around the screen. Previously there was just server-side support for moving windows in Wayland while now is client-side support.
  • Nix 2.0 Package Manager Released With A Ton Of Changes
    Nix 2.0 is now available as the latest major update to this functional package manager most commonly associated with the NixOS Linux distribution.
  • KubeVirt v0.3.0-alpha.3: Kubernetes native networking and storage
    First post for quite some time. A side effect of being busy to get streamline our KubeVirt user experience. KubeVirt v0.3.0 was not released at the beginnig of the month. That release was intended to be a little bigger, because it included a large architecture change (to the good). The change itself was amazingly friendly and went in without much problems - even if it took some time. But, the work which was building upon this patch in the storage and network areas was delayed and didn’t make it in time. Thus we skipped the release in order to let storage and network catch up.
  • Top 5 open source projects for 2018
    In our increasingly collaborative world, open source technology is a top trend that is having a major impact on the development and implementation of cutting edge capabilities. Open source is when source code connected to a program is made freely available, giving users the opportunity to make modifications and to share with other users. The common alternative to this is proprietary software, source code that remains under the strict control of an organisation, team or individual, ensuring that the integral code remains private and controlled by its owner.
  • DataTorrent Glues Open Source Componentry with ‘Apoxi’
    Building an enterprise-grade big data application with open source components is not easy. Anybody who has worked with Apache Hadoop ecosystem technology can tell you that. But the folks at DataTorrent say they’ve found a way to accelerate the delivery of secure and scalable big data applications with Apoxi, a new framework they created to stitch together major open source components like Hadoop, Spark, and Kafka, in an extensible and pluggable fashion.

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February