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Wednesday, 25 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 09/04/2013 - 5:44pm
Story Ubuntu File Sharing matthartley 08/04/2013 - 9:47pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 502 srlinuxx 08/04/2013 - 8:25pm
Story Mozilla pulls tracking trigger for Firefox 22 srlinuxx 08/04/2013 - 8:20pm
Story Linux fatware? These distros need to slim down srlinuxx 08/04/2013 - 8:14pm
Story Getting the masses on-side: openSUSE's community manager speaks srlinuxx 08/04/2013 - 8:09pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 07/04/2013 - 6:52pm
Story OpenMandriva Delayed, Mageia Releases Beta srlinuxx 06/04/2013 - 4:21am
Story Top 7 Linux Tips And Tricks For Beginners srlinuxx 1 05/04/2013 - 11:30pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 05/04/2013 - 10:31pm

Understanding and Using file permissions

Filed under
HowTos

In GNU/Linux, file access is restricted. Users don't necessarily have the same rights when it comes to deleting, executing or even reading files. In fact, every file contain data such as its owner, its permissions and other information which defines exactly what can be done with it, and by whom.

Microsoft: Don't sell PCs without operating systems

Filed under
Microsoft

Naked PCs: Free software supporters are angry that Microsoft is putting pressure on PC vendors not to sell machines without an operating system installed.

How To Get Data For Mrtg Without Running SNMP Daemon?

Filed under
HowTos

Plotting traffic graphs is one of the most popular UNIX admin tasks. Mrtg is a great tool and it is widely used for plotting traffic graphs. It can be easily set up to plot statistics for any SNMP-enabled device. But sometimes we can not setup snmp daemon in Linux server because of small amount of memory or because of some another reasons. How we can plot our favourite graphs in such cases? Full Story.

LinuxWorld: Gentlemens' Agreement

Filed under
Linux

One thing you notice on the show floor this year (besides the smoke from the Unisys booth, that is), is the distinct lack of certain vendors. Namely, IBM and HP, who usually have some sort of show floor presence at LinuxWorld. Not this time.

LinuxWorld: GPL 3 And The Linux Kernel Devs

Filed under
Linux

The under-discussion GPL version 3 license is a bit of a hot potato. Some like it and others, such as Linux creator Linus Torvalds, do not.

Making GNOME Look Like OS X

Filed under
HowTos

The GNOME desktop environment offers a wide variety of choices when it comes to cosmetics; you can make it look like practically anything. In its default condition, GNOME is highly usable, but perhaps a little bland. If you've always admired the Apple OS X desktop theme and layout but aren't ready to drop a load of cash on an Apple machine, this article will show you how to make GNOME look and feel more like OS X.

2006: The year of desktop Linux?

Filed under
Linux

If ever there was a time for agencies to think about the operating system they deploy on their client systems, it's now. That's because Windows Vista is on the horizon, complete with steep hardware requirements and confusing upgrade pricing. So chances are you have an OS upgrade in your near-term plans. The question is, which OS will it be?

Open-Source Advocates: Microsoft's Development Model Is Failing

Filed under
Microsoft

Proponents of the free and open-source software development model are using the recently announced delays in the shipping of Microsoft's Windows Vista and Office 2007 products as an example of how the company's software engineering process simply does not work well.

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AppArmor: Much Ado About Nothing

Filed under
SUSE

The most important question for AppArmor is to ask in which scenarios in can provide a reasonable security improvement. The problem is, there aren't many.

Linux, Lingerie Perfect Mix For Fashion Company

Filed under
Linux

ASX-listed underwear, fashion design and direct sales company UnderCoverWear (UCW) has revealed how building its business around Linux and open source increased IT flexibility while avoiding vendor lock-in.

SourceForge.net Features New Site Enhancements

Filed under
Web

As part of an ongoing site re-architecture to optimize the user experience, SourceForge.net has further enhanced its site design to improve both the functionality and usability. Since deployment of the first phase of site enhancements on last November, SourceForge.net monthly traffic and downloads have increased 13% and 10%, respectively.

Apple boss 'admitted' taking name from Beatles

Filed under
Mac

THE latest round in the 25 year battle between Apple Corps, the Beatles' music company, and US giant Apple Computer brought a claim on Monday that the latter has admitted taking its name from the former.

The unabridged selective transcript of Richard M Stallman's talk at the ANU

Filed under
OSS

Richard Matthew Stallman, the father of the GNU movement once gave a talk at the Australian National University where he explained his stand on the name GNU/Linux, the Digital Millennium Act, DRM which Stallman chooses to call Digital Restriction Management, software idea patents and many other topics of interest to GNU and all freedom loving people.

Microsoft, Linux and Patents

Filed under
Microsoft

At www.no-lobbyists-as-such.com we're reminded that Microsoft wants Linux dead. Ballmer is once again making noise about patents. Unfortunately, Microsoft likely does have patents it could use against Linux.

Open Source For Perimeter Security

Filed under
OSS

There is a widespread and wholly inaccurate impression that open source development is somehow haphazard and undisciplined, a free-for-all among brilliant but uncoordinated individuals. In fact, most major open source projects are very tightly managed highly disciplined teams. This article gives examples of very successful Open Source security projects - netfilter and Snort - and also describes some weaknesses that need to be addressed by IT organizations or vendors.

Open Source: A way of life and a viable alternative to 'greed is good' paradigm

Filed under
OSS

Open source is all about empowering. The thrill of open source is not just about making money but about having something you created. It is not just about creating code either. It is sharing, kindness, compassion and a big dose of ego all at the same time.

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10 Easy Steps to Make Your Linux Useable

Filed under
Linux

This list/mini-guide covers simple and extremely effective ways to make your Linux a more enjoyable OS from top to bottom, and take the geek-factor out.

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More in Tux Machines

5 top Blender video tutorials for beginners

Blender is a complex piece of software that is capable of producing extremely high-quality visuals for all manner of visual art purposes, from video games to product visualization. Of course, that power needs to be wielded by a controlled hand. Otherwise, you'll end up with a mush of digital geometry that makes no sense at all. These days, video tutorials are the educational tool of choice for most people. I'm going to give you five of the best free beginner video tutorials for Blender currently available. I recommend you watch all of them. They all cover a lot of the same information. However, every instructor has a different way of presenting. Stick with the one that clicks with you. Read more

Cinnamon 3.8 Desktop Environment Released with Python 3 Support, Improvements

Scheduled to ship with the upcoming Linux Mint 19 "Tara" operating system series this summer, the Cinnamon 3.8 desktop environment is now available for download and it's a major release that brings numerous improvements, new features, and lots of Python 3 ports for a bunch of components. Among the components that got ported to Python 3 in the Cinnamon 3.8 release, we can mention cinnamon-settings, cinnamon-menu-editor, cinnamon-desktop-editor, cinnamon-settings-users, melange, background slideshow, the switch editor and screensaver lock dialogs, desktop file generation scripts, as well as all the utilities. Read more

Canonical Releases Kernel Security Updates for Ubuntu 17.10 and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

For Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) users, today's security update addresses a bug (CVE-2018-8043) in Linux kernel's Broadcom UniMAC MDIO bus controller driver, which improperly validated device resources, allowing a local attacker to crash the vulnerable system by causing a denial of service (DoS attack). For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) users, the security patch fixes a buffer overread vulnerability (CVE-2017-13305) in Linux kernel's keyring subsystem and an information disclosure vulnerability (CVE-2018-5750) in the SMBus driver for ACPI Embedded Controllers. Both issues could allow a local attacker to expose sensitive information. Read more

Security: Updates, Reproducible Builds, Match.com and More

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #156
  • A Match.com glitch reactivated a bunch of old profiles, raising concerns about user data

    A Match Group spokesperson confirmed that a “limited number” of old accounts had been accidentally reactivated recently and that any account affected received a password reset. Match.com’s current privacy statement, which was last updated in 2016, says that the company can “retain certain information associated with your account” even after you close it. But that Match Group spokesperson also told The Verge that the company plans to roll out a new privacy policy “in the next month or so,” in order to comply with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR); under the new policy, all those years-old accounts will be deleted. The Verge has requested clarification on which accounts will qualify for deletion, and what “deletion” will specifically entail, but has not received a response as of press time.

  • New hacks siphon private cryptocurrency keys from airgapped wallets

    Like most of the other attacks developed by Ben-Gurion University professor Mordechai Guri and his colleagues, the currency wallet exploits start with the already significant assumption that a device has already been thoroughly compromised by malware. Still, the research is significant because it shows that even when devices are airgapped—meaning they aren't connected to any other devices to prevent the leaking of highly sensitive data—attackers may still successfully exfiltrate the information. Past papers have defeated airgaps using a wide array of techniques, including electromagnetic emissions from USB devices, radio signals from a computer's video card, infrared capabilities in surveillance cameras, and sounds produced by hard drives.

  • New hacker group targets US health-care industry, researchers say

    The group, which Symantec has named “Orangeworm,” has been installing backdoors in large international corporations based in the U.S., Europe and Asia that operate in the health-care sector.

    Among its victims are health-care providers and pharmaceutical companies, as well as IT companies and equipment manufacturers that work for health organizations.