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About Tux Machines

Friday, 22 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Out in the Open: Say Hello to the Apple of Linux OSes Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 7:49pm
Story Where Linux rules: Supercomputers Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 7:40pm
Story Dual boot Android and Ubuntu Touch on Nexus devices Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 5:32pm
Story openSUSE 13.1 KDE Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 5:08pm
Story KDE's Kdenlive Video Editor Has Gone Dark Rianne Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 5:02pm
Story Eric Schmidt tells iOS users how to switch to Android Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 4:57pm
Story Gnu: toward the post-scarcity world – the Free Software Column Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 4:44pm
Story The European Commission's Neelie Kroes believes in open Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 4:41pm
Story Tux Machines Plans for 2014 and Beyond Roy Schestowitz 6 25/11/2013 - 10:07am
Story Linux in Government and Why There is Still NSA Agenda to Keep Wary Eye on Roy Schestowitz 25/11/2013 - 9:16am

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How To: Screen the Ultimate admin tool

Filed under
HowTos

Screen is a must known GNU console tool, this small piece of software comes really handy when you are working on a console or sending long processes on a remote host.

Staking the Vampire: SCO's case comes to an end?

Filed under
OS

What appears to be the real end of the case came on June 28. On that day, U.S. District Court Magistrate Judge Brooke Wells dismissed about two-thirds of SCO's claimed 294 examples of IBM contributing Unix code to Linux.

Is there anything of substance left to SCO's case? The lawyers say no.

Running A Current Distribution On A Little Old Laptop

Filed under
HowTos

Back in May of 2006 I wrote a piece about my experience reviving the Amity CN and received some e-mail from folks who wanted to do the same with theirs and wanted help. This web page is the result. A lot of this is not terribly Amity specific and may well work on other older laptops.

couple of ways of getting free internet access

Filed under
Web

The dawn of the internet era has seen more and more people jump on to the internet bandwagon and spend a significant part of their free as well as work time online. And as with any popular medium, we find energy being dissipated in various quarters in getting free access to it by taking advantage of the loopholes found in the technology being used.

OpenOffice.org and Excel VBA Macros

This screenshot shows a fairly geeky example of a hypocycloid generator. The generator uses a VBA macro, shown lower left, to generate source values from the positions of three interactive sliders on the left near where it says “Parameters.”

Wardriving with Ubuntu Linux and Google Earth

Filed under
HowTos

Wardriving is fun. Going around the neighborhood and mapping all the wireless networks may be nothing more than a geeky hobby but it can sure teach you alot. And viewing the results in Google Earth is icing on the cake.

Book Review: AJAX and PHP: Building Responsive Web Applications

Filed under
Reviews

The book is good, the topic is right, and pretty much everyone is thrilling to learn how to benefit from AJAX -- even if this means you're going to use a lot of JavaScript, which you thought it was not necessary, since you know PHP, a powerful language, right?

SSH tricks

Filed under
HowTos

SSH (secure shell) is a program enabling secure access to remote filesystems. Not everyone is aware of other powerful SSH capabilities, such as passwordless login, automatic execution of commands on a remote system or even mounting a remote folder using SSH! In this article we’ll cover these features and much more.

SuSeLinux Desktop ready in July: Novell

Filed under
SUSE

It appears that we're not having a good week with vendors. Novell has expressed mild annoyance at our article alleging that the company is late with the release its latest whizz bang desktop product, Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop (SLED) 10. In fact, the product is dead on time, according to Novell.

Trolltech Releases Qt 4.2 Technology Preview

Filed under
KDE

"Trolltech announced the release of a technology preview of Qt 4.2 – the upcoming new version of its leading framework for high performance cross-platform application development – to its commercial and open source developer community for feedback.

My Dell blew up too

Filed under
Hardware

In February 2006, my laptop started to smoke and catch fire in my bedroom, under normal use. I contacted Dell, and they requested the laptop be sent in immediately. The replacement laptop began to emit smoke.

Results of the Ubuntu Census Survey

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Census Survey ran during the period from 16th of May to the 8th of June 2006, whereupon it was frozen for analysis. These responses were then processed and analyzed to plot statistical data on the Ubuntu community members.

SCO's Future Murky Following Legal Blow

Filed under
OS

It is unclear how SCO will continue to fund its legal battles: Its cash reserves are disappearing at a rapid pace, while its losses have accelerated over the last year, in large part due to its legal expenses. If not a death knell, the dismissal of most of its claims against IBM is a major blow to its prospects.

The big question: Does Linux have a future?

Filed under
Linux

The Big Question is an initiative between Computer Weekly and recruitment consultancy PSD. Each week we put the Big Question to top IT professionals to get their take on a current talking point.

Time to adopt open source technologies in banks

Filed under
OSS

Traditionally banks and other financial institutions have been averse to adopting open source technology based projects for satisfying their requirement needs. Though there has been a shift in thinking in recent times, there are no major real life examples to cite. The main reason for this is the perception among banks that proprietary software provides increased security and support while open source systems are yet to be time tested.

LugRadio Live returns

Filed under
OSS

After the success of last summer's bash, the founders of the geektastic* radio show LugRadio are holding another live event for the open source community.

Linux cuts Kent Police system costs by 90%

Filed under
SUSE

Kent Police has cut the cost of running its major criminal investigations system by 90% using Novell Open Enterprise Server, the company's version of SuSE Linux.

Linux moves towards unified APIs

Filed under
Linux

The Portland Project has released a beta version of its programming interfaces for the Gnome and KDE Linux environments. This is designed to boost development of desktop Linux applications by creating common application programming interfaces (APIs) for developers to use.

Baby did a bad bad thing....

Well from the last thing I wrote in here somewhere (being new means you have no idea where things are), things have changed on the laptop front. After writing some good things about Ubuntu I stumbled across some articles on Suse floating around the 'net and up pops the thought, "perhaps I didn't give it a proper go". Dangerous thought, very dangerous.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more