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Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Vim Tips & Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

You can execute the vim command, while opening files with vim with option -c. While I wanna replace a string from a huge file, first I need to check whether I can do it with sed or not. That means my replace string must be unique, so that it won’t affect others line thatI might not want to replace.

Racoon Roadwarrior Configuration

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Racoon Roadwarrior is a client that uses unknown, dynamically assigned IP addresses to connect to a VPN gateway (in this case also firewall). This is one of the most interesting and today most needed scenarios in business environment. This tutorial shows how to configure Racoon Roadwarrior.

http://www.howtoforge.com/racoon_roadwarrior_vpn

Authenticating on the network

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HowTos

Usually, I get annoyed at having to authenticate myself to each and every service I set up; after all, my passwords are the same everywhere, since I make sure of that myself. On Windows, I wouldn’t have to do that; once I log in, Windows is able to communicate credentials to each and every service that asks for them. But something similar is impossible on GNU/Linux, right? Wrong.

GNOME Interface for YUM: 0.1.5

Filed under
Software

This is the first time for me to hear about gnome-yum, the GNOME interface for YUM, by András Tóth. Version 0.1.5 was just released on Nov. 16, and it doesn't bring much of a change over the older 0.1.2.

Thieves steal thousands from Portland non-profit

Filed under
Misc

Thieves broke into a non-profit that builds computers for people who can't afford them, stealing about $4,500 worth of hardware early Saturday. "Keep an eye out for laptops for sale in Portland loaded with Ubuntu Linux: if you see one of these, please call us! "

how to check the CPU and mem usage of current running process?

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HowTos

We may curious some times why our computer running so slow, and we suspect that must be some programs (process) is running and uses a lots of CPU. We wanna know which process is it, and we have top. But some how top is not so interactive, where there is another program call htop.

Adventures in a New Ubuntu 6.10 Install: Day 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

Since my last post in this series, I’ve been busy customizing the look and feel of Ubuntu, which I find is the funnest part of using Ubuntu! There are so many options and themes and icons and window borders and wallpapers…

PCLinuxOS - perfect halfway house

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PCLOS
Reviews

It's been quite the dilemma over recent months as to which Linux distro is the best choice for users moving away from XP (or "windoze" as it's affectionately labelled by some in the community). Instinctively the majority of users looked to Ubuntu and the user-friendliness of the gnome environment but it was brought to my attention that there's another major player in this exchange, a plucky little distro called PCLinuxOS, and here are my thoughts on it.

Mandriva Free 2007 - the FOSSwire review

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MDV
Reviews

I’m going to take a look at the popular Linux distribution Mandriva; more specifically, their latest free-of-charge desktop outing Mandriva Free 2007.

Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Means and ends in open source

Filed under
OSS

One thing that makes analysis of business strategies in open source difficult (even for professionals) is a confusion of means and ends.

Get Crontab Output in Ubuntu via E-mail

Filed under
HowTos

Having troubles getting your crontab’s output in Ubuntu? Constantly checking your email for a non-existent email? Turns out you might just be missing a message.

Windows vs GNU/Linux vs MacOSX - the showdown

Filed under
OS

I’ve been a Windows user since Windows 3.1, a Desktop GNU/Linux user since August and a MacOSX user for some weeks. I will share with you what I was able to learn from my experience with these operative systems.

Kill Process with Care

Filed under
HowTos

A lots of people likes to do kill -9, which means kill a process by force. By specified -9, process will be terminated by force, which is very fast and confirm kill but it leaves hidden side effects. Refers to Useless use of kill -9, kill a process by specified -9 may leave child processes of a parent orphaned, temporary files open, shared memory segments active, and sockets busy. This leaves the system in a messy state, and could lead to unanticipated and hard to debug problems.

Ubuntu to add proprietary drivers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Analysis -- Reluctantly, the Ubuntu developer community has decided that with the next version of Ubuntu, Feisty Fawn, it will be including some proprietary drivers. Feisty Fawn's emphasis on "multimedia enablement" appears to be the culprit.

Also: Linux desktop domination "just a matter of time"

The 451 Group: Calculating Open Source Software Costs and Savings

Filed under
OSS

Raven Zachary, open source senior analyst and practice lead at The 451, expects costs savings to continue driving commercial open source adoption for a long time. He described the 'calculator' included in his lataest report as a practical and vendor-neutral tool.

Microsoft the enemy to Red Hat and Linux community

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Microsoft

Microsoft's deal with Novell has been followed by Ballmer seemingly extending the olive branch to Linux leader Red Hat. However, Red Hat, like others in the Linux community, see Microsoft's moves as containing a veiled threat and just a means to get revenue for nothing.

Open Source - it isn't just about being nice

Filed under
OSS

Michael Tiemann objects to the distinction between "open" and "free" software we suggested in the article entitled 'Take your covenant and shove it', Samba tells Novell. Here's Michael's reply in full:

LinuxToday: IBM--Orca or Penguin?

Filed under
Linux

Along this same vein, doesn't anyone else find it interesting that it's Sun jumping up and defending Free Software rather than IBM, which I believe has a much bigger stake in Linux? Where is IBM, anyway? I have three theories.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, US Demand for Back Doors, and Microsoft's Collusion with the NSA Keeps Serving Crackers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • State Department Still Sucks At Basic Cybersecurity And Senators Want To Know Why
    The senators are hoping the State Department will have answers to a handful of cybersecurity-related questions by October 12th, but given the agency's progress to compliance with a law that's been on the book for two years at this point, I wouldn't expect responses to be delivered in a timelier fashion. The agency's track record on security isn't great and these recent developments only further cement its reputation as a government ripe for exploitation. The agency's asset-tracking program only tracks Windows devices, its employees are routinely careless with their handling of classified info, and, lest we forget, its former boss ran her own email server, rather than use the agency's. Of course, given this long list of security failures, there's a good possibility an off-site server had more baked-in security than the agency's homebrew.
  • EternalBlue Vulnerability Puts Pirated Windows Systems at Malware Risk [Ed: Microsoft's collusion with the NSA (for US-controlled back doors) continues to cost billions... paid by people who foolishly chose or accepted PCs with Windows.]
    A particular vulnerability that has been codenamed EternalBlue is to be blamed for this misfortune. The malware risk especially affects computers which use pirated Windows versions. This gap in security has its traces back in the legacies of US secret service NSA. Even after several years, many systems continue to be vulnerable. For more than three years, US intelligence was using it for performing hidden attacks on all kinds of targets. The agency finally had to leak the vulnerability to Microsoft due to the danger of hacking by a famous hacker group, Shadow Brokers. Microsoft then consequently had to abandon a patch day for the very first time in the company’s history for filling in the gap as quickly as possible.

today's howtos

Moving Compiler Dependency Checks to Kconfig

One reason became clear recently when Linus Torvalds asked developers to add an entirely new system of dependency checks to the Kconfig language, specifically testing the capabilities of the GCC compiler. It's actually an important issue. The Linux kernel wants to support as many versions of GCC as possible—so long as doing so would not require too much insanity in the kernel code itself—but different versions of GCC support different features. The GCC developers always are tweaking and adjusting, and GCC releases also sometimes have bugs that need to be worked around. Some Linux kernel features can only be built using one version of the compiler or another. And, some features build better or faster if they can take advantage of various GCC features that exist only in certain versions. Up until this year, the kernel build system has had to check all those compiler features by hand, using many hacky methods. The art of probing a tool to find out if it supports a given feature dates back decades and is filled with insanity. Imagine giving a command that you know will fail, but giving it anyway because the specific manner of failure will tell you what you need to know for a future command to work. Now imagine hundreds of hacks like that in the Linux kernel build system. Read more

Fedora be pretty - The ultimate customization guide

I am quite pleased with the final result of this transformation. But it also requires a lot of non-standard changes, which is a shame, because none of what I did, subjective taste elements aside, is super complicated. Imagine a Fedora, or for that any which distro, that has everything really nicely tailored for max. efficiency, ergonomics, productivity, and fun. My journey encompasses the use of third-party repos, extra software, Gnome Tweak Tool, about a dozen extensions, new themes, icons, and fonts, the use of a dock, plus some extra visual polish. In the end, though, Fedora 28 looks and behaves the part. This is something I could happily show to other people, and I am convinced they would be inclined to try it. Well, there you go. The guide. Hopefully, you'll find it useful, and perhaps it may even hype up your enthusiasm for Linux. In these dreary times, an injection of fanboyese is quite needed. Take care. Read more