Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE PIM November Sprint Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:12pm
Story Qt embedded GUI adds Yocto recipes, hops up emulator Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 11:02pm
Story Rocking conf.kde.in 2014! Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 10:58pm
Story Red Hat's Polymita acquisition to spawn new products Rianne Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 10:49pm
Story Ubuntu Mobile hands-on review Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 3:50pm
Story Canonical CEO: Ubuntu wants to power everything from smartphones to the cloud Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 3:47pm
Story The Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 1:59pm
Story Leftovers: Games Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 1:41pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 1:40pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 03/03/2014 - 1:38pm

$100 Laptop May Be at Security Forefront

Filed under
Hardware

The $100 laptops planned for children around the world might turn out to be as revolutionary for their security measures as for their low-cost economics.

Microsoft releases Windows Vista RC2

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp. today released what it expects to be the final release of Windows Vista before the operating system is sent to manufacturing for distribution.

Linux, Mepis not for 'geeks only'

Filed under
Linux

I've mentioned here before that one of my favorite versions of Linux for basic computer people is Mepis. Mepis has a very familiar feel to WinXP.

Linux more accessible

Filed under
SUSE

Novell hopes its SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 (SLED) will tempt everyday computer owners to abandon Windows and switch to a newer, cheaper and supposedly better alternative.

Linux Kernel Denial of Service Vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security

Some vulnerabilities have been reported in the Linux 2.6 Kernel, which can be exploited by malicious, local users and malicious people to cause a DoS (Denial of Service).

Konsole license violations highlight GPL confusion

Filed under
OSS

In July, Konsole author Lars Doelle posted a note on the MotorolaFans.com forum about two programs that appear to violate the GNU General Public License (GPL), under which Konsole is licensed. GPL violations are nothing new, but in this case Doelle has not only put the violators on notice, he's also telling users to stop using the offending programs as well.

Open source phone out next year

Filed under
Hardware

A dual mode phone which runs on the Linux operating system will be put on sale early next year by D-Link. The V-CLICK will switch between Wi-Fi and GSM or GPRS networks at the click of a button, says D-Link, and will be 'unlocked', so users should be able to use it with any SIM card.

How to install Songbird on your Ubuntu box and then enjoy the music

Filed under
HowTos

Songbird is shaping up to be an amazing media player. It’s not only got audio and video capability (with a HUGE range of media types) but it’s built on the Mozilla engine, meaning it’s also a web browser. Here’s how to set it up on your Ubuntu box, add it to your applications menu and generally enjoy it.

Also: Install Opera Web Browser and Realplayer 10 in Ubuntu

Mmorpg Tibia offers linux-client for beta-testing

Filed under
Gaming

After several years of waiting the commercial 2D-Mmorpg Tibia now offers a linux-client in beta-status. They used to have a badly written linux-client years ago, but then abandoned support for it and now again offer a brand new one.

UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 1: File maintenance tools

Filed under
News

Systems administrators can use a number of programs to maintain files in a UNIX® system from the command line. In this tutorial, you'll experiment with commands, such as cd, cp, and tar, to navigate a UNIX file system from the command line and work with files and directories. You'll also learn how to deal with file permissions and perform simple input/output.

iPod + Linux = Portable Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Like millions of other people, I, too, am fascinated by Apple's iPod. Some critics might try to say that it's just another music player, but its appeal goes much deeper than that. The iPod is the definition of modern pop culture, and whether they actually need one or not, people want to get a hold of them because they're, well, cool. Is there anything wrong with that?

Automatic update of packages using cron-apt

Filed under
HowTos

cron-apt Contains a tool that is run by a cron job at regular intervals. By default it just updates the package list and download new packages without installing. You can instruct it to run anything that you can do with apt-get (or aptitude).

Canonical seeks profit from free Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical is the 65-employee start-up behind a popular version of Linux called "Ubuntu". The company is betting that it can win a place in the market using a strategy that dominant Linux seller Red Hat has dropped.

Getting IPTables to survive a reboot

Filed under
HowTos

Debian does not provide an initscript for iptables by default. This does however not mean that it is impossible to get firewall rules to survive a reboot.

Insurance firm sues Microsoft over Xbox house fire

Filed under
Legal

AN INSURANCE COMPANY acting on behalf of Melvin Young has sued Microsoft because his house suffered an extensive fire because an Xbox malfunctioned on January 5th last year.

A Review of Slackware 11

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

I've been using Linux for well over 4 years now as my primary OS. I started way back with Slackware, and to this day I can't stop slackin. With the newly released Slackware 11, let's see how much has changed since I first fell head over heals for the distro so many years ago.

$100 Laptop Price Increases

Filed under
OLPC

In an ironic twist, the anticipated price of the 2007 model of the “$100 laptop” will be $138. Announced last month by Nicholas Negroponte, the chairman of the One Laptop Per Child association, the projected price will drop to $100 by the end of 2008 and $50 in 2010.

The announcement came at the second annual AMD Global Vision Conference in Pasadena, Calif.

In Memoriam: Ralph Griswold(1934-2006)

Filed under
Obits

Ralph Griswold, creator of SNOBOL and Icon, former staff member at Bell Labs and Professor of Computer Science at the University of Arizona, died 4 October 2006, losing a bout of cancer.

ATI R300: Open v. Closed Drivers on a ThinkPad R52

Filed under
Software

Five months ago to the day, we had compared the open-source and fglrx display drivers here at Phoronix for the ATI R200 generation components. However, how do the drivers compare for the newer R300 generation components? We at Phoronix have analyzed the open-source and official closed-source drivers and have some interesting results to share today.

SUSE Linux 10: easy to use, cheaper to run

Filed under
SUSE

Novell CTO Ross Chevalier is traveling the continent giving demonstrations of Novell SUSE Linux 10 Enterprise Desktop.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

RISC-V and NVIDIA

  • Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform Enlists Deep Learning Accelerator
    SiFive introduces what it’s calling the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. A demo shown at the Hot Chips conference consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces First Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform With NVIDIA Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, the leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA's Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive's HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world's first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive's silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • SiFive Announces Open-Source RISC-V-Based SoC Platform with Nvidia Deep Learning Accelerator Technology
    SiFive, a leading provider of commercial RISC-V processor IP, today announced the first open-source RISC-V-based SoC platform for edge inference applications based on NVIDIA’s Deep Learning Accelerator (NVDLA) technology. The demo will be shown this week at the Hot Chips conference and consists of NVDLA running on an FPGA connected via ChipLink to SiFive’s HiFive Unleashed board powered by the Freedom U540, the world’s first Linux-capable RISC-V processor. The complete SiFive implementation is well suited for intelligence at the edge, where high-performance with improved power and area profiles are crucial. SiFive’s silicon design capabilities and innovative business model enables a simplified path to building custom silicon on the RISC-V architecture with NVDLA.
  • NVIDIA Unveils The GeForce RTX 20 Series, Linux Benchmarks Should Be Coming
    NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang has just announced the GeForce RTX 2080 series from his keynote ahead of Gamescom 2018 this week in Cologne, Germany.
  • NVIDIA have officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs, launching September
    The GPU race continues on once again, as NVIDIA have now officially announced the GeForce RTX 2000 series of GPUs and they're launching in September. This new series will be based on their Turing architecture and their RTX platform. These new RT Cores will "enable real-time ray tracing of objects and environments with physically accurate shadows, reflections, refractions and global illumination." which sounds rather fun.

today's leftovers

GNOME Shell, Mutter, and Ubuntu's GNOME Theme

Benchmarks on GNU/Linux

  • Linux vs. Windows Benchmark: Threadripper 2990WX vs. Core i9-7980XE Tested
    The last chess benchmark we’re going to look at is Crafty and again we’re measuring performance in nodes per second. Interestingly, the Core i9-7980XE wins out here and saw the biggest performance uplift when moving to Linux, a 5% performance increase was seen opposed to just 3% for the 2990WX and this made the Intel CPU 12% faster overall.
  • Which is faster, rsync or rdiff-backup?
    As our data grows (and some filesystems balloon to over 800GBs, with many small files) we have started seeing our night time backups continue through the morning, causing serious disk i/o problems as our users wake up and regular usage rises. For years we have implemented a conservative backup policy - each server runs the backup twice: once via rdiff-backup to the onsite server with 10 days of increments kept. A second is an rsync to our offsite backup servers for disaster recovery. Simple, I thought. I will change the rdiff-backup to the onsite server to use the ultra fast and simple rsync. Then, I'll use borgbackup to create an incremental backup from the onsite backup server to our off site backup servers. Piece of cake. And with each server only running one backup instead of two, they should complete in record time. Except, some how the rsync backup to the onsite backup server was taking almost as long as the original rdiff-backup to the onsite server and rsync backup to the offsite server combined. What? I thought nothing was faster than the awesome simplicity of rsync, especially compared to the ancient python-based rdiff-backup, which hasn't had an upstream release since 2009.