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Wednesday, 19 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way

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HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on SuSE systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Backup and Restore Your Ubuntu System using Sbackup

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HowTos

Data can be lost in different ways some of them are because of hardware failures,you accidentally delete or overwrite a file. Some data loss occurs as a result of natural disasters and other circumstances beyond your control. Now we will see a easy backup and restore tool called “sbackup”

Howto Bypass Ubuntu Login Screen

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Ubuntu
HowTos

I think many of you who has installed Ubuntu, must hava encountered a login screen before you actually can use the Ubuntu desktop. However there’s a way to enable automatic login to your desktop and completely bypass the login screen.

Open source start-ups speak out

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OSS

Entrepreneurs attending a recent forum in Germany showed how they plan to use clever open source products — commercially — to compete with proprietary software companies.

Vim Tips & Tricks

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HowTos

You can execute the vim command, while opening files with vim with option -c. While I wanna replace a string from a huge file, first I need to check whether I can do it with sed or not. That means my replace string must be unique, so that it won’t affect others line thatI might not want to replace.

Racoon Roadwarrior Configuration

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Racoon Roadwarrior is a client that uses unknown, dynamically assigned IP addresses to connect to a VPN gateway (in this case also firewall). This is one of the most interesting and today most needed scenarios in business environment. This tutorial shows how to configure Racoon Roadwarrior.

http://www.howtoforge.com/racoon_roadwarrior_vpn

Authenticating on the network

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HowTos

Usually, I get annoyed at having to authenticate myself to each and every service I set up; after all, my passwords are the same everywhere, since I make sure of that myself. On Windows, I wouldn’t have to do that; once I log in, Windows is able to communicate credentials to each and every service that asks for them. But something similar is impossible on GNU/Linux, right? Wrong.

GNOME Interface for YUM: 0.1.5

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Software

This is the first time for me to hear about gnome-yum, the GNOME interface for YUM, by András Tóth. Version 0.1.5 was just released on Nov. 16, and it doesn't bring much of a change over the older 0.1.2.

Thieves steal thousands from Portland non-profit

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Misc

Thieves broke into a non-profit that builds computers for people who can't afford them, stealing about $4,500 worth of hardware early Saturday. "Keep an eye out for laptops for sale in Portland loaded with Ubuntu Linux: if you see one of these, please call us! "

how to check the CPU and mem usage of current running process?

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HowTos

We may curious some times why our computer running so slow, and we suspect that must be some programs (process) is running and uses a lots of CPU. We wanna know which process is it, and we have top. But some how top is not so interactive, where there is another program call htop.

Adventures in a New Ubuntu 6.10 Install: Day 5

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Ubuntu

Since my last post in this series, I’ve been busy customizing the look and feel of Ubuntu, which I find is the funnest part of using Ubuntu! There are so many options and themes and icons and window borders and wallpapers…

PCLinuxOS - perfect halfway house

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PCLOS
Reviews

It's been quite the dilemma over recent months as to which Linux distro is the best choice for users moving away from XP (or "windoze" as it's affectionately labelled by some in the community). Instinctively the majority of users looked to Ubuntu and the user-friendliness of the gnome environment but it was brought to my attention that there's another major player in this exchange, a plucky little distro called PCLinuxOS, and here are my thoughts on it.

Mandriva Free 2007 - the FOSSwire review

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MDV
Reviews

I’m going to take a look at the popular Linux distribution Mandriva; more specifically, their latest free-of-charge desktop outing Mandriva Free 2007.

Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Means and ends in open source

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OSS

One thing that makes analysis of business strategies in open source difficult (even for professionals) is a confusion of means and ends.

Get Crontab Output in Ubuntu via E-mail

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HowTos

Having troubles getting your crontab’s output in Ubuntu? Constantly checking your email for a non-existent email? Turns out you might just be missing a message.

Windows vs GNU/Linux vs MacOSX - the showdown

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OS

I’ve been a Windows user since Windows 3.1, a Desktop GNU/Linux user since August and a MacOSX user for some weeks. I will share with you what I was able to learn from my experience with these operative systems.

Kill Process with Care

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HowTos

A lots of people likes to do kill -9, which means kill a process by force. By specified -9, process will be terminated by force, which is very fast and confirm kill but it leaves hidden side effects. Refers to Useless use of kill -9, kill a process by specified -9 may leave child processes of a parent orphaned, temporary files open, shared memory segments active, and sockets busy. This leaves the system in a messy state, and could lead to unanticipated and hard to debug problems.

Ubuntu to add proprietary drivers

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Ubuntu

Analysis -- Reluctantly, the Ubuntu developer community has decided that with the next version of Ubuntu, Feisty Fawn, it will be including some proprietary drivers. Feisty Fawn's emphasis on "multimedia enablement" appears to be the culprit.

Also: Linux desktop domination "just a matter of time"

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: PodCTL, Security Embargos at Red Hat and Energy Sector

  • [Podcast] PodCTL #50 – Listener Mailbag Questions
    As the community around PodCTL has grown (~8000 weekly listeners) we’ve constantly asked them to give us feedback on topics to discuss and areas where they want to learn. This week we discussed and answered a number of questions about big data and analytics, application deployments, routing security, and storage deployment models.
  • Security Embargos at Red Hat
    The software security industry uses the term Embargo to describe the period of time that a security flaw is known privately, prior to a deadline, after which time the details become known to the public. There are no concrete rules for handling embargoed security flaws, but Red Hat uses some industry standard guidelines on how we handle them. When an issue is under embargo, Red Hat cannot share information about that issue prior to it becoming public after an agreed upon deadline. It is likely that any software project will have to deal with an embargoed security flaw at some point, and this is often the case for Red Hat.
  • Transforming oil & gas: Exploration and production will reap the rewards
    Through advanced technologies based on open standards, Red Hat deliver solutions that can support oil and gas companies as they modernize their IT infrastructures and build a framework to meet market and technology challenges. Taking advantage of modern, open architectures can help oil and gas providers attract new customers and provide entry into markets where these kinds of services were technologically impossible a decade ago.

BlackArch Linux Ethical Hacking OS Now Has More Than 2000 Hacking Tools

The BlackArch Linux penetration testing and ethical hacking computer operating system now has more than 2000 tools in its repositories, announced the project's developers recently. Used by thousands of hundreds of hackers and security researchers all over the world, BlackArch Linux is one of the most acclaimed Linux-based operating systems for hacking and other security-related tasks. It has its own software repositories that contain thousands of tools. The OS is based on the famous Arch Linux operating system and follows a rolling release model, where users install once and receive updates forever, or at least until they do something that can't be repaired and need to reinstall. Read more

Debian Patches for Intel's Defects, Canonical to Fix Ubuntu Security Flaws for a Fee

  • Debian Outs Updated Intel Microcode to Mitigate Spectre V4 and V3a on More CPUs
    The Debian Project released an updated Intel microcode firmware for users of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system series to mitigate two of the latest Spectre vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs. Last month, on August 16, Debian's Moritz Muehlenhoff announced the availability of an Intel microcode update that provided Speculative Store Bypass Disable (SSBD) support needed to address both the Spectre Variant 4 and Spectre Variant 3a security vulnerabilities. However, the Intel microcode update released last month was available only for some types of Intel CPUs, so now the Debian Project released an updated version that implements SSBD support for additional Intel CPU models to mitigate both Spectre V4 and V3a on Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" systems.
  • Announcing Extended Security Maintenance for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – “Trusty Tahr” [Ed: Canonical looking to profit from security flaws in Ubuntu like Microsoft does in Windows.]
    Ubuntu is the basis for the majority of cloud-based workloads today. With over 450 million public cloud instances launched since the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, a number that keeps accelerating on a day-per-day basis since, many of the largest web-scale deployments are using Ubuntu. This includes financial, big data, media, and many other workloads and use cases, which rely on the stability and continuity of the underlying operating system to provide the mission-critical service their customers rely on. Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) was introduced for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS as a way to extend the availability of critical and important security patches beyond the nominal End of Life date of Ubuntu 12.04. Organisations use ESM to address security compliance concerns while they manage the upgrade process to newer versions of Ubuntu under full support. The ability to plan application upgrades in a failsafe environment continues to be cited as the main value for adoption of ESM. With the End of Life of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS in April 2019, and to support the planning efforts of developers worldwide, Canonical is announcing the availability of ESM for Ubuntu 14.04.
  • Canonical Announces Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Extended Security Maintenance
    Canonical announced today that it would extend its commercial Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) offering to the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series starting May 2019. Last year on April 28, 2017, when the Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) operating system series reached end of life, Canonical announced a new way for corporate users and enterprises to receive security updates if they wanted to keep their current Ubuntu 12.04 LTS installations and had no plans to upgrade to a newer LTS (Long Term Support) release. The offering was called Extended Security Maintenance (ESM) and had a great success among businesses.

Graphics: NVIDIA and AMD

  • Initial NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Linux Benchmarks
    This article is going to be short and sweet as just receiving the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti yesterday and then not receiving the Linux driver build until earlier today... The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti has been busy now for a few hours with the Phoronix Test Suite on the Core i7 8086K system running Ubuntu 18.04 LTS with the latest drivers.
  • NVIDIA Introduces A Number Of New OpenGL Extensions For Turing
    As part of the GeForce RTX 2080 series launching with the new GPU architecture, NVIDIA has published a number of new OpenGL extensions for making use of some of Turing's new capabilities.
  • Vulkan 1.1.85 Released With Raytracing, Mesh Shaders & Other New NVIDIA Extensions
    Leading up to the Turing launch we weren't sure if NVIDIA was going to deliver same-day Vulkan support for RTX/ray-tracing with the GeForce RTX graphics cards or if it was going to be left up to Direct3D 12 on Windows for a while... Fortunately, as already reported, their new driver has Vulkan RTX support. Additionally, the NVX_raytracing extension and other NVIDIA updates made it into today's Vulkan 1.1.85 release.
  • Radeon/GPUOpen OCAT 1.2 Released But No Linux Support Yet
    A new feature release is out for the Radeon/GPUOpen "OCAT" open-source capture and analytics tool. OCAT 1.2 is their first release of the year and includes VR head-mounted display (HMD) support, new visualization tools, system information detection, new settings, and other enhancements.