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Thursday, 19 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical posts a $21 million loss – is Ubuntu’s future doomed? Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2014 - 12:15am
Story What I Saw on the CES Show Floor: Your Work on Display Roy Schestowitz 15/01/2014 - 12:13am
Story Make: Article on Novena Roy Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:35pm
Story Non-Linux FOSS: Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray) Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:18pm
Story Red Hat Academy Expands Training, Includes OpenStack Coursework Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:09pm
Story Valve Updates SteamOS With CPU/GPU Optimizations Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:03pm
Story Linux.conf.au, Linux Darling, and More Linux List Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:58pm
Story CyanogenMod launches new Gallery App Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:44pm
Story Linux Mint 16: No Surprises, but Plenty of Solid Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:39pm
Story AMD's Updated Catalyst Linux Driver Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:28pm

PrBoom Version 2.4.5 is released.

Filed under
Gaming

Fixed crash when saving the game in levels with lots of monsters, Unified software and opengl engine into one binary, Added video mode selection to menu, fix demo desyncs on E1M5 on x86_64 systems...

Instant Linux for Windows admins means no installation

Filed under
Linux

Many Windows administrators want to try out Linux without having to install an entirely new operating system alongside XP, or reformatting their hard disk. Now there's a way to get "instant Linux" – with the free software called Knoppix.

Web site disasters made easy

Filed under
Software

I built a LAMP (Linux, Apache, Perl/Python/PHP) sales portal that handled online ordering and a corporate Web site. It generated revenue from the outset. Then our parent company in Japan was flying in to help rescue our LAMP system. We didn't know it needed rescuing.

A revolution in a laptop

Filed under
Hardware

While software applications and the companies that develop them have become the main drivers in today’s information society, the CM1, more commonly known as the $100 laptop, could take over where the venerable 5150 left off - becoming one of the enduring pieces of techno hardware in the next 25 years.

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GNU/Linux? But you don't LOOK like a geek...

Filed under
Linux

I was sitting on an uncomfortably high plastic chair waiting... waiting... waiting... and that was just for the office suite to load on MS2000. One of my fellow post grad students was sitting at the terminal next to me. We had exchanged pleasantries and I knew he had an IT background, and the wait time was getting ridiculous, and so I said, as a way of passing the time, “I forgot how slow this whole windows business is”. He looked at me, in a puzzled, suspicious way. “Why?”, he enquired. “What do you use?” I replied “Ubuntu”, his eyebrows shot up and he looked at me like I had just grown a third head.

Texstar Does it Again!

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

Recently, Texstar released a Junior version. Known as PCLINUXOS 0.93A JUNIOR, this version comes with a set of pre-selected programs for Web Browsing, E-mail, IM, Blogging, DVDS/CD burning and a whole lot more. It is a GREAT way for someone migrating from Windows to Linux to get started. While the single CD might seem somewhat minimalistic, once installed some 5,000 programs await the user from the Synaptic repositories.

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior Review

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

In 2003, a new distribution forked from Mandrake Linux 9.2. Its creator was a packager called Texstar who was also maintaining a website called "PCLinuxOnline". He named his distribution "PCLinuxOS" and worked closely with "The Live CD Project" to make a Live CD distribution based on Mandrake but which would use its own packages and the APT package manager.

GNU Gnash Screenshots and Review

Filed under
Software

GNU Gnash is an open source implementation of Adobe's Flash Player and its rendering technology. Although its source code originated from other open source projects, the entire code base is a clean-room implementation of Flash.

Take a closer look at OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD

OpenBSD is quite possibly the most secure operating system on the planet. Every step of the development process focuses on building a secure, open, and free platform. UNIX® and Linux® administrators take note: Without realizing it, you probably use tools ported from OpenBSD every day. Maybe it's time to give the whole operating system a closer look.

openSUSE 10.2 Alpha 3 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

Well, openSUSE 10.2 Alpha 3 is in our midst and Tuxmachines is here to keep you posted. This release we tested both an upgrade and a fresh install. We found this to be a very interesting release to say the least. It's an alpha to be sure to say the most.

Micro-Evolution: Dates and Contacts

Filed under
Software

The developers at Opened Hand have released a pair of lightweight, low-resource applications for calendaring and address book management. They were designed to run on small embedded systems such as Nokia's 770 Internet Tablet and the Sharp Zaurus -- but that doesn't mean you can't use them on your desktop Linux box just as easily.

Simple Emerge/Portage Tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

Emerge is Gentoo Linux's frontend for Portage. Portage is a collection of programs that you can install from a list on your system. Emerge is what you use to install packages from Portage.

Oracle User Survey Finds Open Source Making Inroads

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is making inroads into Oracle database installations with some 60 percent of IT installations using some form of open source software, according to a new survey of Oracle sites.

Time to Get Serious

Filed under
Linux

It is often touted by many Linux users (including myself) that one of its greatest strengths lies in its diversity. Recently, however, I have seen evidence that points to a new shift in the FUD wind coming from Microsoft--a shift that tries to place that self-same diversity as a Linux fault.

And from all appearances, this tactic is working.

Linux powers unusual multicore machine

Filed under
Linux

A start-up called Movidis believes a 16-core chip originally designed for networking gear will be a ticket to success in the Linux server market.

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Ubuntu's new conquest: California freeways

Filed under
Ubuntu

Living in California's Silicon Valley has many benefits, not least of which is exposure to the "next big thing" on a near-daily basis. Yesterday, we discovered that Ubuntu Linux, not content to target first desktops and then servers, is now getting installed on billboards!

DejaVu font wins its way into Fedora Linux

Filed under
Linux

A proposal has prevailed to make the open-source DejaVu font project the default used in Red Hat's upcoming Fedora Core 6 version of Linux. The font replaces Vera, a previous font released by Bistream, on which DejaVu is based. Fedora Core 6 is due Oct. 9.

LinuxWorld: Get Ready For Some Surprises

Filed under
Linux

It's that time of year again when the Linux world converges on San Francisco to talk about all things Linux.

And of course all the major players in the Linux world will be there; many have news, and others just have things they want to say about the news to come.

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Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Released nine months ago on October 19, 2017, Ubuntu 17.10 was dubbed "Artful Aardvark" by Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth because it was the first release of the Ubuntu Linux operating system to ship with the GNOME desktop environment instead of Unity on the Desktop edition. To due to the sudden move from Unity to GNOME, Ubuntu 17.10 brought several substantial changes, such as the switch to the next-generation Wayland display server by default instead of X.Org Server, a decision that was reverted with the release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), and the discontinuation of the Ubuntu GNOME flavor. Read more

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Linux File Server Guide

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