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Sunday, 17 Dec 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Foolproofing Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Guess what? In the coming months, your company may very well hear from those involved in updating the GPL. The next version of the license is being drafted now under the direction of the Free Software Foundation. This may be the first time in history that customers themselves have been asked to help define the terms of a software license.

Red Hat bangs security drum

Filed under
Linux

Banging the security drum at the Linuxworld tradeshow in San Francisco Red Hat today unveiled an initiative dubbed Security in a Networked World.

U.S. cities focus on spy cameras

The striking images of London subway bombers captured by the city's extensive video surveillance system and a rising sense that similar attacks could happen in the U.S. are renewing interest in expanding police camera surveillance of America's public places.

Open-source needs more women developers

Filed under
OSS

Only about 2% of the thousands of developers working on open-source software projects are women and that issue was the topic of a panel discussion here on Friday, the last day of the seventh annual O'Reilly Open Source Convention, as they discussed ways to reverse that pattern.

Bush's EU man attacked for Microsoft links

Filed under
Misc

The Free Software Foundation Europe has criticised President Bush's decision to nominate a long-time ally of Microsoft as the US representative to the European Union.

Debian Dissension Gets Louder

Filed under
Linux

The Debian Common Core Alliance hasn't even been formally announced yet at LinuxWorld in San Francisco this week, and already one of its prospective members, VA Linux Japan, is explaining why it isn't joining.

LinuxWorld outgrows original outfit

Filed under
Linux

Now, for many, Linux isn't even on center stage at a show that's expected to attract more than 11,000 attendees and 200 exhibitors to San Francisco. Instead, the open-source operating system acts as a draw for a certain desirable audience.

Google Snubs Tech News Outlet CNET

Filed under
Web

Google Inc. is refusing to speak with reporters at CNET's online news site after it ran a story that used Google's chief executive to illustrate how easily the company's search engine finds personal information.

New pay service creates online gaming arena

GameSpot, one of the most popular Web sites for video game enthusiasts, has started a new subscription online service where hard-core gamers can battle each other in the most popular online computer games.

Google sued over claims of excess advertising fees

Filed under
Legal

Google Inc. is being sued over accusations that it overcharged advertisers who use the Web search giant's paid search advertising program.

Linux fans to flock to Moscone

Filed under
OSS

The penguin-heads are here. More than 11,000 people, fans of the Linux operating system and its penguin mascot, dive in to the annual LinuxWorld conference at Moscone West this week.

Sony claims PS 3 Linux & Tiger capable

Filed under
Gaming

The company said: "The integrated Cell processor will be able to support a variety of operating systems (such as Linux or Apple's Tiger)."

March of the Penguin

Filed under
Linux

Open-source software, once primarily associated with computer operating systems, is now being used by companies for critical functions and software applications such as storing data, managing customers and analyzing business information.

Gentoo Linux 2005.1 Released

Filed under
Gentoo

The Gentoo Foundation is both pleased and proud to announce the much anticipated release of Gentoo Linux 2005.1 (Codename: 'El Nino').

LinuxWorld Focus Turns to Security

Looking to counter Microsoft Corp.'s claims of security superiority, open-source software vendors are giving the battle against vulnerabilities top billing at this week's LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in San Francisco.

M$ slams F-Secure for Windows Vista virus report

Filed under
Microsoft

"It's a misleading title," Holmes said about F-Secure post, "as it's an issue that affects any vehicle for any executable code on any operating system."

Robotic aid arrives in rush to rescue 7 from Russian sub

Filed under
Sci/Tech

U.S. and British planes carrying robotic undersea vehicles landed in Russia's far east Saturday to help rescue seven sailors trapped in a mini-submarine 600 feet below the Pacific.

Google urged to drop images

Filed under
Web

THE head of Australia's nuclear energy agency has called on the owners of an internet satellite program to censor images of the country's only nuclear reactor.

An Honest Look At Linux

Filed under
Linux

Recently, an article appeared on CoolTechZone.com entitled: “Is It Wrong To Love Microsoft?” This type of rhetoric is rampant within the Linux and Microsoft Camps. This is not an “answer” to the above-mentioned article. It is simply a well timed release of an article written over the past few days.

Install Mac OSx on Intel... NOW?

Filed under
Mac

there is a tarred image of MacOSX which can be installed on INTEL PC right now ...

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Graphics: Texture Compression, Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL), and AMD FreeSync

  • Unity Continues Crunching More Out Of Crunch Texture Compression
    Unity is one of the big public users of the open-source Crunch DXT texture compression library. While it's no longer maintained by Rich Geldreich / Binomial, Unity has continued advancing this open-source code to further improve the compression ratio and speed. For months Unity has been talking about their promising findings with Crunch. But this is the project that Rich Geldreich, the former Valve developer, previously expressed regret having open-sourced all of it. While he is on to working on better and more advanced technologies at his Binomial startup, Unity is working to squeeze more out of this open-source library.
  • Improving EFL Graphics With Wayland Application Redraws
    Under X, application redraws are tricky to do without tearing because content can be updated at any chosen time with no clear feedback as to when the compositor will read it. EFL uses some clever tricks to this end (check out the state of the art X redraw timing for yourself), but it’s difficult to get right in all cases. For a lot of people this just works, or they’re not sensitive to the issue when it doesn’t.
  • Improved Wayland Application Redraws Coming To Enlightenment's EFL
    Samsung's Open-Source Group has been working on making their Wayland support in the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) even better. The latest Wayland work on the Enlightenment/EFL front has been improving the application redraw process. The EFL toolkit with the upcoming v1.21 release will now be hooking into Wayland's frame callbacks to better dealing with drawing, only drawing when necessary, and doing so without the possibility of tearing.
  • AMD FreeSync For Tear-Free Linux Gaming - Current State In 2017
    If you are thinking of gifting yourself (or someone else) a FreeSync-compatible monitor this holiday season, here's a look at how the AMD FreeSync support is working right now, the driver bits you need to be aware of, and how it's all playing out for those wanting to use this tear-free capability for Linux gaming.

KStars 2.8.9 is released!

Here comes the last KStars release for 2017! KStars v2.8.9 is available now for Windows, MacOS, and Linux. Robert Lancaster worked on improving PHD2 support with Ekos. This includes retrieving the guide star image, drift errors and RMS values, among other minor improvements and refactoring of the Ekos PHD2 codebase to support future extensions. Read more

Security: Mirai, Vista 10, Starbucks, and Hacking Team Investigation

  • Mirai IoT Botnet Co-Authors Plead Guilty

    The U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday unsealed the guilty pleas of two men first identified in January 2017 by KrebsOnSecurity as the likely co-authors of Mirai, a malware strain that remotely enslaves so-called “Internet of Things” devices such as security cameras, routers, and digital video recorders for use in large scale attacks designed to knock Web sites and entire networks offline (including multiple major attacks against this site).

  • Google Researcher Finds Flaw in Pre-Installed Windows 10 Password Manager
    Google security researcher Tavis Ormandy, who has previously discovered, reported, and disclosed several major bugs in Windows and its features, came across a new security vulnerability affecting Microsoft users. This time, the flaw exists in the Keeper password manager that comes pre-installed in some Windows 10 versions, with Ormandy explaining that it’s similar to a vulnerability that he discovered in August 2016. “I remember filing a bug a while ago about how they were injecting privileged UI into pages,” Ormandy explained on December 14. “I checked and, they're doing the same thing again with this version,” he continues.
  • Starbucks Wi-Fi Turned People’s Laptops into Cryptocurrency Miners
    The free Wi-Fi that the Buenos Aires Starbucks offers to its customers was being used to mine for cryptocurrency, and what’s worse, it used people’s laptops to do it. The whole thing was discovered by Stensul CEO Noah Dinkin who actually paid a visit to the store and wanted to browse the web using the free Wi-Fi, only to discover that his laptop was unknowingly converted into a cryptocurrency miner. He then turned to Twitter to ask Starbucks if they know about the what he described as bitcoin mining taking place without customers knowing about it. “Hi Starbucks, did you know that your in-store wifi provider in Buenos Aires forces a 10 second delay when you first connect to the wifi so it can mine bitcoin using a customer's laptop? Feels a little off-brand,” he said in his tweet.
  • Italian Prosecutor Makes Request to Close Hacking Team Investigation
    The damaging data breach that exposed the secrets of an infamous surveillance tech company might go unsolved forever. After more than two years, the Italian prosecutor who was investigating the attack on the Milan-based Hacking Team has asked the case to be dismissed, according to multiple sources. On Monday, the Milan prosecutor Alessandro Gobbis sent a notice to the people under investigation informing them that he had sent the judge a request to shut down the investigation, according to a copy of the document obtained by Motherboard.