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Wednesday, 20 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more

OpenOffice.org 2.0.3: Ready For Download!

Filed under
Software

OpenOffice.org 2.0.3 is recommended for all. Enhancements include:
performance improvements, improvements to file format compatibility with Microsoft Office, and built-in check for updated versions.

Using the Fluxbox Window Manager

Filed under
Fluxbox
HowTos

I started using Linux in the pre-KDE and pre-GNOME days. These have become pretty much the de-facto graphic user interface for Linux and with good reason. I have tried them for perhaps 3 weeks to a month at a time. I had always stuck with my trusted FVWM. That was, until, out of curiosity, I tried Fluxbox.

Killing That Spam With Postgrey And Postfix

Filed under
HowTos

There are numerous ways to prevent spam from reaching your inbox, the most popular is probably SpamAssassin. Greylisting will not replace spam filtering software like SA but it will serve as a powerful first hurdle for spam. It should rather be seen as an addition to all the other anti spam features of Postfix.

Make PDFs talk

Filed under
HowTos

Many magazines and book publishers make available a free online version of their products, often as PDF files. Chances are you scroll through multiple pages of PDFs every day. To reduce the number of miles you put on the mouse wheel, you can use free software to read out the documents to you.

India Stays Cool To Open Source

Filed under
OSS

India, once seen as fertile ground for open-source software, has yet to embrace the development model in the way many hoped it would.

Linux: ext4 Filesystem

Filed under
Linux

Theodore Ts'o offered an insightful summary of issues affecting future development on the ext3 filesystem. He listed the three main concerns for future development as stability, compatibility confusion, and code complexity.

Tip of the Trade: Drupal

Filed under
Software

Deploying and using it may not be completely painless, but Drupal is a great content management system (CMS) framework that is lightweight, modular, and not too difficult to navigate. There is nothing exotic or excessively "creative" in its construction — it's just a nice sensible implementation of PHP and either PostgreSQL or MySQL on the back end. What can you do with Drupal?

Book Review: Code Quality

Filed under
Reviews

With his first book, Code Reading, Diomidis Spinellis broke new ground. Here was a major book on the oft-neglected but important skill of reading source code. Now, with this follow-up study, Spinellis continues to champion the skills required to understand and maintain large bodies of code.

FBI Nabs Movie Pirates

Filed under
Misc

Counterfeiters sometimes bribe their way into advance screenings, so their work can hit the black market before the movies are released in theaters. This is part of a broader scheme the movie industry says robbed it of an estimated US$18 billion in global revenue in 2005.

Why Linux Has Failed Beginners

Filed under
Linux

Over the years, I've had a number of people asking me what I believe the problem was with further migration over to Linux by the public at large. To be frank, I don't believe that there is a simple answer to this. To me, there are a number of factors that play a role in keeping Linux out of the mainstream limelight.

Linux site gets other Ideas

Filed under
Linux

Linux distributor Interactive Ideas has thrown its weight behind the relaunch of a web site that aims to increase the use of open source software across Europe.

Is It Time For Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Many in the Linux world believe that Linux desktops can easily replace Microsoft Windows for certain uses. They also admit that the Linux desktop may not be a solution for all Windows users, but they firmly believe that they are making progress toward that goal.

Bono Asked to Aid Copy-Protection Fight

Filed under
OSS

He's bent the ear of world leaders on social causes. He's a Nobel Peace Prize nominee. He's a rock star. But could the lead singer of U2 also become a front man for a grass-roots campaign seeking to change how the music industry does business?

The Free Software Foundation hopes so.

Forget the apple; surprise teacher with open-source software

Filed under
OSS

Few things are quite so technically cutting edge as open-source software, which is why you expect to see it used by really cutting-edge folks.

Like . . . kindergarten teachers?

Learn Perl in 10 easy lessons - Lesson 3

Filed under
HowTos

In the previous lesson we learnt what variables were and how to use command line arguments in Perl. We also wrote our second Perl script: the Calculator. In this lesson we will learn how to use If statements and loops and how to open files to read and write into them.

Open Source Smack-Down

Filed under
OSS

Fans of the free Linux operating system should be popping champagne tonight. A judge has tossed out most of the claims in a case claiming Linux contained stolen code.

Building a Linux Network Appliance, Part 3

You probably already know that a firewall is an essential component in your network border security. But you may not know that a Linux-based iptables firewall is especially robust and configurable. Today we'll set up system administration using Webmin, and in our next installment we'll create a good stout Internet-connection sharing firewall.

Xgl in action

Filed under
SUSE

My buddies over at ExtremeTech have a little online TV show, Digital Life TV. In a recent episode, they have a heck of a good time playing with xgl on OpenSUSE. You'll be amazed! You'll be dazed! Xgl really is incredibly neat, and now you can finally see it for yourself.

Novell takes Microsoft fight to desktop

Filed under
SUSE

If Novell can capitalize on its solid reputation with the IT department and get office workers hooked on its desktop operating system, SUSE and the open-source programs that run on it will put a dent in Microsoft's armour.

Book review: Nagios: System and Network Monitoring

Filed under
Reviews

While Nagios cannot prevent outages, it can actively monitor conditions and alert the appropriate people to ensure functionality can be restored quickly. Nagios: System and Network Monitoring by Wolfgang Barth is an excellent book well written from front to back.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Desktop: Flatpak and Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension

  • Flatpak in detail, part 2
    The first post in this series looked at runtimes and extensions. Here, we’ll look at how flatpak keeps the applications and runtimes on your system organized, with installations, repositories, branches, commits and deployments.
  • Flatpak – a history
    I’ve been working on Flatpak for almost 4 years now, and 1.0 is getting closer. I think it might be interesting at this point to take a retrospective look at the history of Flatpak.
  • Random Wallpaper Gnome Extension Changes Your Desktop Background With Images From Various Online Sources
    Random Wallpaper is an extension for Gnome Shell that can automatically fetch wallpapers from a multitude of online sources and set it as your desktop background. The automatic wallpaper changer comes with built-in support for downloading wallpapers from unsplash.com, desktopper.co, wallhaven.cc, as well as support for basic JSON APIs or files. The JSON support is in fact my favorite feature in Random Wallpaper. That's because thanks to it and the examples available on the Random Wallpaper GitHub Wiki, one can easily add Chromecast Images, NASA Picture of the day, Bing Picture of the day, and Google Earth View (Google Earth photos from a selection of around 1500 curated locations) as image sources.

today's howtos

KDE: QtPad, Celebrating 10 Years with KDE, GSoC 2018

  • QtPad - Modern Customizable Sticky Note App for Linux
    In this article, we'll focus on how to install and use QtPad on Ubuntu 18.04. Qtpad is a unique and highly customizable sticky note application written in Qt5 and Python3 tailored for Unix systems.
  • Celebrating 10 Years with KDE
    Of course I am using KDE software much longer. My first Linux distribution, SuSE 6.2 (the precursor to openSUSE), came with KDE 1.1.1 and was already released 19 years ago. But this post is not celebrating the years I am using KDE software. Exactly ten years ago, dear Albert committed my first contribution to KDE. A simple patch for a problem that looked obvious to fix, but waiting for someone to actually do the work. Not really understanding the consequences, it marks the start of my journey within the amazing KDE community.
  • GSoC 2018 – Coding Period (May 28th to June 18th): First Evaluation and Progress with LVM VG
    I got some problems during the last weeks of Google Summer of Code which made me deal with some challenges. One of these challenges was caused by a HD physical problem. I haven’t made a backup of some work and had to rework again in some parts of my code. As I already knew how to proceed, it was faster than the first time. I had to understand how the device loading process is made in Calamares to load a preview of the new LVM VG during its creation in Partition Page. I need to list it as a new storage device in this page and deal with the revert process. I’ve implemented some basic fixes and tried to improve it.

Open Hardware: Good for Your Brand, Good for Your Bottom Line

Chip makers are starting to catch on to the advantages of open, however. SiFive has released an entirely open RISC-V development board. Its campaign on the Crowd Supply crowd-funding website very quickly raised more than $140,000 USD. The board itself is hailed as a game-changer in the world of hardware. Developments like these will ensure that it won't be long before the hardware equivalent of LEGO's bricks will soon be as open as the designs built using them. Read more