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Monday, 16 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Managing Linux servers in a Windows world

Filed under
Interviews

As Linux servers continue to pervade data centers at increasing rates, one of the biggest challenges to strike IT managers is getting those servers to work well with their existing Windows systems. Recently, Centeris CEO Barry Crist sat down with SearchOpenSource.com to talk about why the landscape for cross-platform server management is improving .

Should I Really Care About Linux?

Filed under
Linux

I'm not writing this to totally bash Linux. It's not that I'm against it, but I just have to examine what my real motivation is. I literally have everything that I need and more with Windows and OS X, so why throw something else into the mix?

Processing RAW image files on Linux

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HowTos

The easiest way to sound like a professional when you talk about photography these days is to grumble about the deficiencies of RAW file converters. The ability to save pictures in RAW format rather than JPEG or TIFF is what distinguishes a "pro level" camera from a consumer device. But rather than mentioning your camera's specs outright, the shrewd move is the heavy sigh followed by lamentations about your tireless search for the perfect software to properly manipulate your beautiful work. Let's take a look at how to do it using Linux and open source.

Easing kids into free software

Filed under
OSS

A few months ago I went in search of educational software written for Linux. I built her a machine from old spares and wanted to introduce her to the world of open source software. I was astonished at the amount of open source software for kids out there.

Fedora Core 6 Test 2 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Fedora Core 6 Test 2 is now out after a Xen delay late last month. Among the notable highlights in F6t2 include all packages are recompiled (built using Mock, packages also now have proper BuildRequires), ability to install from additional yum repositories during the Anaconda/KickStart installation, Java web applet from gcjwebplugin, new default font, package updates and upgrades, and Fedora Core 6 Extras. Phoronix has some nice screenshots.

Novell Says SLES 10 Has Impressive First Ten Days

Filed under
SUSE

If the first ten days in the aftermath of the launch of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, the brand-spanking-new server operating system from Novell Inc, is any indication, then perhaps there is finally some hope that Novell's plummeting NetWare business will not take the company down with it.

Linux-ize Your Notebook

Filed under
Linux

Notebook PCs and Linux are learning to get along better than ever before. Linux has come a long way since its initial inception as an academic development project undertaken by Linus Torvalds during his college years. It's no longer the sole province of the enthusiast crowd or just a hobby horse for academia. In fact, this progressive platform has become the poster child for the Open Source movement.

Why I Love Debian

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Linux

There’s a lot of great distros out there, but Debian just meets my taste. I’ve been using Debian over a year now and this is why I love it: Freedom.

AMD to drop ATi brand

Filed under
Hardware

Chip guru AMD has announced that it's going to drop the ATi brand name following its takeover of the Canadian graphics underdog. Gareth Cater from AMD told Custom PC that 'the new company will be called AMD,' meaning that we could shortly be seeing AMD-branded Radeon graphics chips.

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An open source security triple play

Filed under
HowTos

Want to protect your SOHO machine or LAN from rootkits and malware, but want something a little more real-time than simply running Chkrootkit or another rootkit detector after the fact? Consider OSSEC-HIDS, an open source host intrusion detection system.

Ubuntu Linux view the status of my network Interfaces/card

Filed under
HowTos

You can verify connectivity or status of your network Interfaces/card using standard Linux command. Open your terminal and use following commands:

OLPC Sugar: The Best Of All the Project?

Filed under
OLPC

I do not believe in the OLPC (One Laptop Per Child) project, a.k.a. the "$100 laptop". I couldn't possibly believe in a "handmill laptop", and I don't believe this is the solution for the 3rd world countries. I very much liked (given the intended audience) the proposed design and some mockups.

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Stable kernel 2.6.17.8 released

Filed under
Linux

The 2.6.17.8 stable kernel is available. There is a fairly long list of important fixes this time around, but none with CVE (vulnerability) numbers attached. More Info.

Book Review: Linux Server Security

Filed under
Reviews

Linux system vulnerabilities have amplified in monstrous proportion, with perfunctory probes and break-in attempts occurring at regular frequencies. In times where patching itself needs to make good progress, this title from O’Reilly offers some insightful tools and techniques to prevent your Linux server from being compromised.

Amarok Live Calling for Artwork

Filed under
Software

The Amarok project has announced an artwork contest for their upcoming live CD, Amarok Live, for fancy new version 1.4. The contest includes among other things bootsplash screens, wallpapers and Amarok splash screens.

Buying a preinstalled Linux desktop or laptop

Filed under
Hardware

For my money, I'd first look to see if the company is an official partner of its Linux distributor. If I'm going to buy a SUSE Linux-powered computer, for example, I'd rather get it from someone who's a Novell partner rather than someone whose only connection to Novell is that they downloaded a copy of openSUSE 10.1.

Fedora Core 6 - First Impressions

Filed under
Linux

Fedora Core 6 Test 2 is out. I’ve been running Rawhide (the development version of Fedora Core), updating it daily and installing it periodically from a local network server, but the test releases provide a welcome opportunity to install from optical disc.
The step from FC5 to FC6 is smaller and more evolutionary than FC4 to FC5. Highlights:

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Containers, Tron, Back Doors, GandCrab, Bastille Day

  • A New Method of Containment: IBM Nabla Containers
    In the previous post about Containers and Cloud Security, I noted that most of the tenants of a Cloud Service Provider (CSP) could safely not worry about the Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP) and leave the CSP to manage the risk.  However, there is a small category of jobs (mostly in the financial and allied industries) where the damage done by a Horizontal Breach of the container cannot be adequately compensated by contractual remedies.  For these cases, a team at IBM research has been looking at ways of reducing the HAP with a view to making containers more secure than hypervisors.  For the impatient, the full open source release of the Nabla Containers technology is here and here, but for the more patient, let me explain what we did and why.  We’ll have a follow on post about the measurement methodology for the HAP and how we proved better containment than even hypervisor solutions. [...] Like most sandbox models, the Nabla containers approach is an alternative to namespacing for containment, but it still requires cgroups for resource management.  The figures show that the containment HAP is actually better than that achieved with a hypervisor and the performance, while being marginally less than a namespaced container, is greater than that obtained by running a container inside a hypervisor.  Thus we conclude that for tenants who have a real need for HAP reduction, this is a viable technology.
  • Measuring the Horizontal Attack Profile of Nabla Containers
  • Tron (TRX) Gives $25,000 to 5 Developers Who Spotted Bugs in Open-Source Code
    Just a couple of days ago, Binance – a very popular digital currency trading platform – credited the Binance account of thirty-one selected Tron (TRX) traders with five million TRX tokens. Recently, the Tron Foundation has also announced it gave away $25k to five developers that are actively working to redefine the community of Tron.
  • Open Source Security Podcast: Episode 105 - More backdoors in open source
  • GandCrab v4.1 Ransomware and the Speculated SMB Exploit Spreader [Ed: Microsoft's collaboration with the NSA on back doors is a gift to keeps giving.... to crackers.]
  • Rewritten GandCrab Ransomware Targets SMB Vulnerabilities To Attack Faster
    GandCrab ransomware, which has created a hullabaloo in the cybersecurity industry by constantly evolving, has yet again caused a commotion. The latest version of the ransomware attacks system using SMB exploit spreader via compromised websites. The ransomware is adding new features every day to target different countries. The attackers behind the ransomware are scanning the whole internet to find the vulnerable websites to unleash the attack. The latest version features a long hard-coded list of websites that were compromised and were used to connect with it.
  • France’s cyber command marched in Paris’s Bastille Day Parade for the first time
     

    For the first time, France’s military cyber command marched in this year’s Bastille Day parade on the Champs Elysees in Paris, alongside other units in the nation’s armed forces. The military noted that it’s a recognition of the advances that the unit has made since its formation last year, and reinforces that “cyber defense remains a national priority.”  

    French defense minister Jean-Yves Le Drian announced the formation of COMCYBER in December 2016, noting that the emergence of state actors operating in cyberspace was a new way to approach warfare. The command brought all of the nation’s soldiers focused on cyber defense under one command, with three main tasks: cyber intelligence, protection, and offense.  

  • Should I let my staff choose their own kit and, if so, how?

Review: Hyperbola GNU/Linux-libre 0.2.4

Hyperbola GNU/Linux-libre is a curious project that takes a number of interesting approaches which set it apart from other distributions. The Hyperbola distribution is based on snapshots of Arch Linux. While Arch Linux is a rolling release distribution, Hyperbola maintains fixed releases taken from Arch snapshots and then, according to the project's website, the Hyperbola developers mix in security updates from Debian. The idea is to create an Arch-like operating system with a fixed base and minor patch updates. The distribution is dedicated to free software ideals and ships only libre software as defined by the Free Software Foundation. Finally, Hyperbola makes a special edition called Hypertalking which is based on TalkingArch and provides accessibility software for visually impaired users. I downloaded the distribution's main edition which is available as a 672MB ISO. The distribution media will boot on both 32-bit and 64-bit systems with the option to select which architecture we want from the ISO's boot menu. When the disc boots we are presented with a text console where we are advised we can see documentation for getting on-line using the Lynx web browser by typing "lynx network.html". The default, text-based interface on the disc is quite minimal, but it's enough to partition our hard drive and set up a local copy of the operating system. I don't think it's intended to do much more than that. Read more

Ubuntu’s Snap Apps Website Gets Much Needed Improvements

Ubuntu has updated its Snap Store website making it more useful for the users by adding developer verification, categories, improved search. Read more

Android Leftovers