Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Gentoo Portage secrets

Filed under
Gentoo
HowTos

Gentoo Linux is perhaps the most-used source-based Linux distribution. One secret to its success is the powerful and handy Portage package management system. While Gentoo comes with extensive documentation covering most aspects of using Portage, the techniques described in Gentoo's handbook and other documentation are not always the most effective ones. Here are some insider tips that can greatly increase your productivity.

Frugalware 0.5pre2: promising a good 0.5 release

Filed under
Linux

Since some people feel that «Frugalware = Slackware + Archlinux», I thought I must give it a try. Oh, the Archlinux part of it is the Pacman package manager, and the fact that Frugalware has a lot more (official) packages than Slackware was a big attraction to me.

Red Hat ramps up JBoss support

Filed under
Misc

Red Hat is on an engineer recruitment spree to boost the support operation for JBoss and drive measured growth for its open source applications business.

Stable Kernel v2.4.33 released

Filed under
Linux

Files added: Added 3, Changed 149, Deleted 0. Lines added: Added 6345, Changed 3817, Deleted 2734.

Download patch here or Full Source here.

Chapter 16: Pluggin' In the Penguin

Filed under
HowTos

This article is from Chapter 16 of a new book published by No Starch Press: Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks: A Pain-Free, Project-Based, Get-Things-Done Guidebook by Rickford Grant and covers using your iPod with Ubuntu.

Nagios 2.5 and Oreon 1.3 (Nagios web front end) installation with screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Oreon© is an Open Source monitoring solution based on Nagios. It offers to this monitoring standard a new front end and brings it a panel of new functionalities.

Read Full article here

n/a

Happy Birthday openSUSE!

Filed under
SUSE

Exactly one year ago Novell announced the openSUSE project to develop its Linux distribution, which is also the base for the Linux enterprise products, in an open way. I was one of the first to download Beta 1 of SUSE Linux 10.0.

Everything you always wanted to know about Linux distros

Filed under
Linux

Well, maybe not everything, but I will give the authors of the Wikipedia article, Comparison of Linux Distributions, credit for a good try. In this article, you'll find multiple tables of more than 50 different Linux distributions.

Best Open Source Content Management System, 2006

A new award scheme was launched today by Packt Publishing offering a first prize of $5,000 and the title of best Open Source Content Management System, 2006. Voted for by a panel of independent judges and visitors to Packt, the award is designed to recognize and reward outstanding achievement in a high quality and highly competitive marketplace.

Novell CTO defends 'unstable' Xen claims

Filed under
SUSE

Novell chief technology officer (CTO) Markus Rex has hit back at criticism the company included an "unstable" Xen virtualisation environment in its new Linux server, pointing to support from hardware partners.

KDE-Edu Birds of a Feather Session at aKademy 2006

Filed under
KDE

This year in Dublin will host the annual meeting of the KDE community, and it will be a great occasion for developers to meet, code, hold bug-fixing sessions, discussions and much more.

Sabayon Linux RC2: First Look

Filed under
Linux

The distro formally known as RR4 is soon to be released, and we have taken a hard first look at what's being offered. Based on Gentoo, Sabayon already has a solid base. Add superb Live DVD functionality and a complete installer, this is one distro worth watching.

Ubuntu update fixes Dapper bugs

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu team today released Ubuntu 6.06.1 LTS, the first maintenance release of Dapper Drake. This release includes over 300 updates that have been applied to the OS since its original release on June 1.

Why i love Drupal so much

Filed under
Drupal

I'm still very new to Drupal and at the start of the rocky learning curve i had to confess to questioning my journey with this CMS.

n/a

Freespire 1.0: first impressions

Filed under
Reviews

Freespire 1.0, the community edition of the Linspire distro, was released to the world a few days ago. Sporting out-the-box support for various codecs and features not normally included in free-to-download Linux distros, it could have a big impact in the Linux world. But how does it stack up?

Also: Freespire's Early Delivery

Linux OS "just as bloated as Windows"

Filed under
Linux

A WEB SITE has launched into an attack on the 15 year old Linux in a tirade which puts the attack on James I in the shade.

Bringing a Linux box to Work - Part 2

Filed under
PCLOS

Part 2 in the series of articles that details my experiences in using a Linux box in a Microsoft enviroment. Day 1:

On Monday morning, I packed up my spare PC with a freshly installed copy of PCLinuxOS MiniMe 0.93, put it in the car, and took it to work with me.

Novell Renames Community Linux Distribution 'openSUSE'

Filed under
SUSE

Novell today announced simplified branding to make it even easier for customers to identify the right Linux* product for their needs. SUSE® Linux, Novell's award- winning community Linux distribution, will now be known as "openSUSE(TM)," echoing the name of the Novell-sponsored open source Linux project, openSUSE.org. Novell's enterprise Linux products will continue to be designated "SUSE Linux Enterprise."

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

FUD, EEE, and Openwashing

Kubernetes News

  • When Does Kubernetes Become Invisible And Ubiquitous?
    The sign of a mature technology is not just how pervasive it is, but in how invisible and easy to use it is. No one thinks about wall sockets any more – unless you happen to need one to charge your phone and can’t find one – and that is but one example of a slew of technologies that are part of every day life. Since Google first open sourced the Kubernetes container controller, inspired by its Borg and Omega internal cluster and container management systems, more than four years ago, we have been betting that it would become the dominant way of managing containers on clouds both public and private. The irony is that the people in charge of Google’s infrastructure were not initially all that enthusiastic in giving away such intellectual property, but the Kubernetes and open source enthusiasts correctly predicted that Google would get tremendous cred with the open source community and help create a Google-alike containerized private cloud environment and also possibly spread Google’s approach to rival clouds as well as helping its own Cloud Platform expansion by giving Kubernetes to the world.
  • Crictl Vs Podman
    As people continue to adopt CRI-O as a new container runtime for Kubernetes I am hearing questions from administrators who are confused whether they should use Crictl or Podman to diagnose and understand what is going on in a Kubernetes node. This is not one or the other — these tools are complementary, and this article attempts to explain the tools and examine when it is best to use each of these tools. If you take away one thing from this post, remember that Crictl checks the front entrance, while Podman examines the foundation. First things first. For those people who aren’t familiar with it, CRI-O is a lightweight, Open Container Initiative (OCI) compliant, container runtime for Kubernetes. It is designed to run any OCI-based container, it is optimized for Kubernetes and committed to being stable and conformant with the Kubernetes container runtime interface with each Kubernetes release. CRI-O is also now fully supported in OpenShift, Red Hat’s enterprise Kubernetes container platform. For more information on CRI-O check out the CRI-O community web site and blog.
  • BlueData Announces BlueK8s Open Source Kubernetes Initiative
    Kubernetes (aka K8s) is now the de facto standard for container orchestration. Kubernetes adoption is accelerating for stateless applications and microservices, and the community is beginning to evolve and mature the capabilities required for stateful applications. But large-scale distributed stateful applications – including analytics, data science, machine learning (ML), and deep learning (DL) applications for AI and Big Data use cases – are still complex and challenging to deploy with Kubernetes.

RPM And Yum Are A Big Deal For IBM i. Here’s Why

By now you’ve probably heard about Yum and RPM, the new processes that IBM will use to deliver open source software to IBM i customers. But you may have questions about how the process works, and what the benefits will be. IT Jungle talked with IBM’s open source guru Jesse Gorzinski to get the low down on why the new tech is so important to the platform. RPM, which stands for Red Hat Package Manager, is a piece of software created more than 20 years that allows customers in that Linux community to more easily distribute and install the various pieces of software required to create a working Linux environment. Over the years, RPM use has migrated beyond the Red Hat community to other Linux and Unix environments (including AIX), and has essentially become a de facto standard for distributing software in the open source world. Read more Also: Red Hat Announces Ansible Engine 2.6 with Simplified Connections to Network APIs and Automation across Windows & Cloud

New Facilities for System76

  • System76 Linux computer maker offers a sneak peek into its new manufacturing facility
    System76 has long been a Linux computer seller, but recently, it has transitioned into a Linux computer maker. What's the difference, you ask? Well, currently, the company doesn't really make its own computers. System76's laptops, for instance, are made by other manufacturers, which it re-brands as its own. No, System76 doesn't just slap its name on other company's laptops and ship them out the door. Actually, it works closely with the manufacturers, tweaks firmware, and verifies that both Ubuntu and its Ubuntu-based Pop!_OS will work well on the hardware. System76 then offers top-notch support too. In other words, the company isn't just selling a computer, but an experience too.
  • System76 New Manufacturing Facility
  • System76 Moves Ahead With Preparing To Manufacture Their Own Desktop Linux PCs
    Back in April 2017 was the announcement that System76 would begin designing and manufacturing their own systems beginning with desktops and to be followed at a later date by their own laptops, rather than relying upon whitebox designs that they currently retail with their Ubuntu/Pop!_OS-loaded PCs. The Colorado-based company is inching closer to fully realizing their goal. For a while now the System76 folks have been posting various pictures of their in-progress manufacturing facility while today they have shared more images on their blog.