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Thursday, 19 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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IBM Unveils Linux IM, HP Unveils Debian

Filed under
Linux

IBM is taking instant messaging to Linux—on both the desktop and server. The company will use the LinuxWorld Conference & Expo to announce that it will support Linux. Hewlett-Packard, of Palo Alto, Calif., will use LinuxWorld to announce global support for the Debian Linux distribution.

Linux Phrasebook Reviewed

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Reviews

One of the greatest strengths of the Linux operating system is the power of the command line. Scott Granneman has compiled a collection of Linux commands that will allow you to do almost anything you need to do from a terminal.

Class Assignment: Implement a Open Source Solution for Non-Profits

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OSS

The undergraduate students in the George Fox University management and business information systems program will be asked to solve an organization's information system problems. Students will rely on open-source software.

Java on Linux vs MS-Win XP

Filed under
Just talk

The computer lab we were using at Western Oregon University had Windows XP on all the machines. The first day of class, I used Win-XP for a few minutes--but I just couldn't stand it anymore . . . I whipped-out my PCLinuxOS CD I'd brought along with me, and proceeded to install Linux on the machine . . .

Elive 0.5 Beta-3.1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

As announced on Distrowatch, "The new generation of Elive has started and the beta-3.1 for the future version 0.5 is officially released. Version 0.5 is based on Dsslive with kernel 2.6.15 and X.Org 7.0. Other new features include SATA support, better compatibility with amd64 processors, new drivers for wireless networking, and several improvements to the hard disk installer. Enlightenment 17 now comes with a beautiful Lucax theme, while Firefox also has an exciting, never-seen-before look." It was time for Tuxmachines to take another look.

Abit KN9 Ultra w/ Fedora Core 5

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Hardware

The Abit KN9 Ultra is backed by the NVIDIA MCP55 Ultra and supports IEEE-1394a, Dual Gigabit LAN, and all of the other Abit extras we are delighted to see back. The KN9 Ultra certainly looks like it may stack up well on paper, but let's see if Abit has truly returned to their famed past set by such motherboards as the NF7-S and IC7-MAX3.

Aurox 12.0 RC1, The Polish Lady

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

What is Aurox 12.0-RC1 DVD? First of all, it's a LiveDVD, and an installable one (à la MEPIS, Ubuntu 6.06, and so on). Based on kernel 2.6.17-1.2139_FC5 (i686), its FC5 origin is pretty obvious, no matter the welcome page after the install will still mention FC3 and FC4. And what is that Aurora has and Fedora Core has not?

PrBoom Version 2.4.5 is released.

Filed under
Gaming

Fixed crash when saving the game in levels with lots of monsters, Unified software and opengl engine into one binary, Added video mode selection to menu, fix demo desyncs on E1M5 on x86_64 systems...

Instant Linux for Windows admins means no installation

Filed under
Linux

Many Windows administrators want to try out Linux without having to install an entirely new operating system alongside XP, or reformatting their hard disk. Now there's a way to get "instant Linux" – with the free software called Knoppix.

Web site disasters made easy

Filed under
Software

I built a LAMP (Linux, Apache, Perl/Python/PHP) sales portal that handled online ordering and a corporate Web site. It generated revenue from the outset. Then our parent company in Japan was flying in to help rescue our LAMP system. We didn't know it needed rescuing.

A revolution in a laptop

Filed under
Hardware

While software applications and the companies that develop them have become the main drivers in today’s information society, the CM1, more commonly known as the $100 laptop, could take over where the venerable 5150 left off - becoming one of the enduring pieces of techno hardware in the next 25 years.

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GNU/Linux? But you don't LOOK like a geek...

Filed under
Linux

I was sitting on an uncomfortably high plastic chair waiting... waiting... waiting... and that was just for the office suite to load on MS2000. One of my fellow post grad students was sitting at the terminal next to me. We had exchanged pleasantries and I knew he had an IT background, and the wait time was getting ridiculous, and so I said, as a way of passing the time, “I forgot how slow this whole windows business is”. He looked at me, in a puzzled, suspicious way. “Why?”, he enquired. “What do you use?” I replied “Ubuntu”, his eyebrows shot up and he looked at me like I had just grown a third head.

Texstar Does it Again!

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

Recently, Texstar released a Junior version. Known as PCLINUXOS 0.93A JUNIOR, this version comes with a set of pre-selected programs for Web Browsing, E-mail, IM, Blogging, DVDS/CD burning and a whole lot more. It is a GREAT way for someone migrating from Windows to Linux to get started. While the single CD might seem somewhat minimalistic, once installed some 5,000 programs await the user from the Synaptic repositories.

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior Review

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PCLOS
Reviews

In 2003, a new distribution forked from Mandrake Linux 9.2. Its creator was a packager called Texstar who was also maintaining a website called "PCLinuxOnline". He named his distribution "PCLinuxOS" and worked closely with "The Live CD Project" to make a Live CD distribution based on Mandrake but which would use its own packages and the APT package manager.

GNU Gnash Screenshots and Review

Filed under
Software

GNU Gnash is an open source implementation of Adobe's Flash Player and its rendering technology. Although its source code originated from other open source projects, the entire code base is a clean-room implementation of Flash.

Take a closer look at OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD

OpenBSD is quite possibly the most secure operating system on the planet. Every step of the development process focuses on building a secure, open, and free platform. UNIX® and Linux® administrators take note: Without realizing it, you probably use tools ported from OpenBSD every day. Maybe it's time to give the whole operating system a closer look.

openSUSE 10.2 Alpha 3 Report

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Reviews
SUSE
-s

Well, openSUSE 10.2 Alpha 3 is in our midst and Tuxmachines is here to keep you posted. This release we tested both an upgrade and a fresh install. We found this to be a very interesting release to say the least. It's an alpha to be sure to say the most.

Micro-Evolution: Dates and Contacts

Filed under
Software

The developers at Opened Hand have released a pair of lightweight, low-resource applications for calendaring and address book management. They were designed to run on small embedded systems such as Nokia's 770 Internet Tablet and the Sharp Zaurus -- but that doesn't mean you can't use them on your desktop Linux box just as easily.

Simple Emerge/Portage Tutorial

Filed under
HowTos

Emerge is Gentoo Linux's frontend for Portage. Portage is a collection of programs that you can install from a list on your system. Emerge is what you use to install packages from Portage.

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Ubuntu 17.10 Reaches End of Life, Existing Users Must Upgrade to 18.04

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3 big steps toward building authentic developer communities

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Amid the 20th anniversary of open source, Tim O’Reilly warns that platform companies built on open-source software have lost their way

It’s rare to hear Chinese philosophy quoted on stage at a software-development conference. But O’Reilly Media founder and CEO Tim O’Reilly invoked the words of Lao Tzu Wednesday morning during the opening keynotes at OSCON 2018 in hopes of convincing those in attendance — many of whom work for the big internet platform companies of our time — that the tech industry needs to return to the spirit of openness and collaboration that drove the early days of the open-source community before it is too late. “We have an opportunity with these next generation of systems, to rebuild, to rethink the future, to discover what does it mean to get these systems right,” O’Reilly said. If the first era of the internet was dominated by open protocols, and the second era was dominated by the rise of huge platform companies like Amazon, Google, and Facebook, the third era we’re about to enter presents a chance to get it right again. Read more