Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 22 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AMD Is Disabling DPM Support For RV770 GPUs Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2014 - 6:49am
Story Create Vector Graphics with Open Source Software Rianne Schestowitz 20/04/2014 - 6:37am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 11:19pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 11:18pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 11:16pm
Story Leveraging Cloud, Open Source To Aid Embattled IT Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 11:13pm
Story Please protest the "Windows 8 Campus Tour" Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 8:59pm
Story We still believe in Linus’ law after Heartbleed bug, says Elie Auvray of Jahia Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 7:31pm
Story New Screenshots of Ubuntu-based Distros Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 7:25pm
Story For Red Hat, it's RHEL and then…? Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2014 - 7:13pm

Ubuntu Wins Most User Friendly Linux Distribution Award

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical Ltd today announced it has scooped another two awards for Ubuntu, its leading-edge Linux distribution. At the Linux New Media Awards, on Wednesday 15th November, Ubuntu was awarded 'Most User-Friendly Linux Distribution', and Canonical the 'Best combination of Community and Commerce'.

Tips for new Gentoo users

Filed under
Gentoo

Gentoo is one of the most difficult distributions to learn, though veteran Gentoo users might point out that its friendly community and extensive documentation can help new users. Here are some tips that might make Gentoo easier for anyone who wants to give it a try.

Mark Shuttleworth: Pervasive support (2)

Filed under
Linux

I have this weird relationship with the words “it’s not supported”. Whenever I’m talking to an audience of typical computer users about Linux I’ll hear those words. So why do people say “Linux is not supported”?

Combining OpenOffice.org text documents using master files

Filed under
HowTos

One of the recurring tasks in these inescapable group projects is combining your work for the final presentation. You can choose to copy and paste, or choose Insert > File, to combine the documents. But on a grand scale and with multiple authors continuing to update their content, this can cause problems.

Creating a managed website—Part 1

Filed under
HowTos

Do you manage a website? Maybe you’re looking after the site for a small business. Maybe you’re doing it for a community group. Perhaps it’s your own personal site. You’d like it to be dynamic: to have some fresh news every week and a home page that’s always up to date. Therein lies the problem.

Also: Improving website security

Step-By-Step Configuration of NAT with iptables

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up network-address-translation (NAT) on a Linux system with iptables rules so that the system can act as a gateway and provide internet access to multiple hosts on a local network using a single public IP address. This is achieved by rewriting the source and/or destination addresses of IP packets as they pass through the NAT system.

http://www.howtoforge.com/nat_iptables

A few tips for starting KDE4 development

Filed under
KDE

If you want to start building KDE4, here are a few hints, gathered from the most frequent questions I hear.

A week with SuSE 10

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

A series of events led me to installing a copy of Novell's Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 last week. Given the hype that Novell had made around the distribution I was expecting to be impressed. And I was.

Dirk Dashing 1.02 released

Filed under
Gaming

Today a Dirk Dashing update has been released for Linux, to fix several bugs found by Linux gamers. This include fixed another problem with the game locking up on some distributions, camera movement near the edge of map, and a bug when restarting a level after dying and camera is not positioned correctly.

More Here.

TurboLinux's Wizpy: bootable Linux on a PMP

Filed under
Linux

We've all seen plenty of Linux computers on a stick before, right? But check the TurboLinux Wizpy which brings all that portable Linux PC and USB mass storage goodness wrapped inside a DivX capable MP3 player. The Wizpy features a 1.7-inch OLED display, 4GB of flash memory, an FM radio, and additional support for OGG/WMA/AAC formats. It comes pre-loaded with Turbolinux Fuji and a smattering of apps such as Firefox, Thunderbird, and Skype.

New online class teaches basic Linux for free

Filed under
Linux

LinuxBasic.org, an online community devoted to helping people learn to install and run Linux, has announced its second free Linux class. "An Introduction to Linux Basics" aims to instill a basic understanding about Linux for beginners who want to know more about how the system works, according to the site.

Fedora Core 6: Beauty or Beast?

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

After the usual new-release downloading frenzy died down a bit, I downloaded the 3.3 gigabyte DVD .iso image, stoked the boiler of my test PC, and put Fedora Core 6 through its paces. My mission: to determine if FC6 is suitable for production systems, or if it's better suited as a bleeding-edge testbed.

Ballmer on Patents: Swinging a Saber or a Salami?

Filed under
News

If MS plans to sue for intellectual property related issues, IBM is unlikely to choose an obsequious posture. Today's leaders at big blue don't cower to opposition. Moreover, even when tides turn, they demonstrate some unique strategy of their own.

Fluxbuntu - Installation & Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

Fluxbuntu is a light-weight, standards-compliant, Ubuntu-based Linux distribution featuring the Fluxbox window manager.The project’s primary goal is to develop an operating system that would run on a wide range of mobile devices and computers, both low-end and high-end.

How to bridge networks with OpenVPN

Filed under
HowTos

OpenVPN is an easy-to-use open source VPN software based on SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) that offers cross-platform interoperability. The majority of OpenVPN tutorials I've found describe how users can connect to a corporate network from their laptops over insecure networks, such as the wireless network in a hotel. By contrast, the setup I'm about to describe is better suited for permanently connecting entire networks -- for example, branch offices to the headquarters of a company.

Playing with partitions

Filed under
HowTos

If you ever partition your hard disk you will find that no matter how smart you think you have organized your partitions you will always come to a situation where you have to play around with your partitions. Fortunately with linux and indeed all *nix based systems it is not only easy but often an integral part of the system. I am going to go through a couple of scenarios.

KDE and Gnome Comparison

Filed under
Software

This is not, by any means a comprehensive look at the differences between KDE and Gnome, but it should give new users a small taste of their different strengths and weaknesses and their philosophical approaches to usability.

Fedora Core 6

Filed under
Reviews

Fedora Core is often called a test version of Red Hat, but many believe that it deserves to be recognised as a fully fledged distribution in its own right. Led by a community and sponsored by Red Hat, Fedora is probably one of the most popular GNU/Linux distributions in the world, with users including Wikipedia. It recently reached its sixth release, so let's see what's inside.

Implementing Disk Quotas on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial walks you through implementing disk quotas for both users and groups on Linux, using a virtual filesystem, which is a filesystem created from a disk file. Since quotas work on a per-filesystem basis, this is a way to implement quotas on a sub-section, or even multiple subsections of your drive, without reformatting. This tutorial also covers quotactl, or quota's C interface, by way of an example program that can store disk usage in a SQLite database for monitoring data usage over time.

Create Photo Mosaics with Metapixel

Filed under
HowTos

I've always thought that mosaics were an interesting art form, so when I ran across Metapixel a while back I noted it as an app worth checking out. Metapixel is a single purpose tool, but it does its job very well. In no time you can create an impressive photo mosaic using your existing photos and a couple commands.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

EEE, Entryism and Openwashing

  • New Linux distro specifically designed for Windows comes to the Microsoft Store [Ed: WLinux or Whitewater Foundry not the first time people exploit Microsoft to put a price tag on FOSS such as LibreOffice. Microsoft is doing a fine job sabotaging the GNU/Linux 'ecosystem'.]
    WLinux is based on Debian, and the developer, Whitewater Foundry, claims their custom distro will also allow faster patching of security and compatibility issues that appear from time to time between upstream distros and WSL. [...] In return for saving developers time Whitewater Foundry is charging $19.99 (though the app is currently 50% off and the distribution can be downloaded from Github for free).
  • Open source dev gets Win32 apps running on Xbox One [Ed: Running blobs on two DRM platforms does not make you "Open source dev"]
  • Building Blocks of Secure Development: How to Make Open Source Work for You [Ed: Veracode self-promotion in "webinar" form, badmouthing FOSS to push their proprietary things. They work with Microsoft.]
  • SD Times open source project of the week: TonY [Ed: Openwashing of a surveillance operation at Microsoft]
    Unsatisfied with the available solutions for connecting the analytics-generating power of their TensorFlow machine learning implementations with the scalable data computation and storage capabilities of their Apache Hadoop clusters, developers at LinkedIn decided that they’d take matters into their own hands with the development of this week’s highlighted project, TonY.
  • Open Source: Automating Release Notes in Github [Ed: The New York Times is still propping up Microsoft hosting]
  • Opendesk launches augmented-reality shopping for its open-source furniture [Ed: Calling furniture "open"]
    Opendesk customers can now use augmented reality to see how the furniture brand's pieces look in their homes before ordering them from local makers. The augmented-reality (AR) experience launched with the arrival of Apple's iOS 12 operating system this week. It enables customers to use their smartphones to view some of Opendesk's furniture superimposed on the room in front of them.
  • Open Source Testing Startup Cypress Leaves Beta With Thousands of Users, Launches Paid Plans [Ed: This is not Open Source; they misuse the label and even put dashes ("open-source") because they know they're faking it.]
    Cypress.io‘s CEO Drew Lanham explains that the startup’s tool is software created by developers, for developers. The company was founded in 2014 by technologist Brian Mann, after observing that while computing and application development had changed drastically over the past decade, software testing had not. Large companies now release thousands of software updates a year, often on a daily basis across their organization. Technology teams aim to move rapidly, iterating on an agile basis and working in parallel so they can sync their code together even faster. But, as Lanham explains, the testing software out there was far outdated for these agile processes.
  • Kindred Introduces SenseAct, the First Reinforcement Learning Open-Source Toolkit for Physical Robots [Ed: Kindred or SenseAct not actually FOSS; but they sure try to make it seem that way, by focusing on a toolkit.]

Top Linux Distros for Software Developers

A major factor in the choice of Linux distro is your personal preference. You may try one of the most popular Linux distros but find that you prefer one that’s less often used. Your experience with Linux will also factor into which distro is suited to you. With the benefits Linux can offer — including flexibility, stability, and support — it’s worth evaluating your options. Read more

Source Code From Deutsche Telekom

  • Edge compute platform is open source
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have partnered for the creation of an Open Source, low latency Edge compute platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster.
  • Deutsche Telekom and Aricent Create Open Source Edge Software Framework
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent today announced the creation of an Open Source, Low Latency Edge Compute Platform available to operators, to enable them to develop and launch 5G mobile applications and services faster. The cost-effective Edge platform is built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and is decentralized, to accelerate the deployment of ultra-low latency applications. The joint solution will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • DT and Aricent announce telco Open Source Edge framework for 5G
    Deutsche Telekom and Aricent have announced the creation of an Open Source Edge software framework, designed especially for developers, platform-as-a-service and cloud-native multi-access edge computing technologies and on-track to intersect with the deployment of 5G enabled network edge facilities to tackle ultra-low latency network applications. The Edge platform has been built for software-defined data centers (SDDC) and will include a software framework with key capabilities for developers, delivered as a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and will incorporate cloud-native Multi-access edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent brew up edge compute platform for 5G apps and services
    In order to speed up the rollout of 5G applications and services, Duetsche Telekom and Aricent have teamed up to build an edge compute platform. The open source, edge software framework was built for use in software-defined data centers in decentralized locations. It also uses cloud-native multiaccess edge computing (MEC) technologies.
  • Deutsche Telekom, Aricent Bridge Cloud Native, Telco MEC Gap
    German telecom giant Deutsche Telekom and Aricent threw their collective weight behind an open source edge computing platform targeted at software-defined data centers (SDDC). The initiative gamely joins a growing list of open source multi-access edge computing (MEC) initiatives. The DT-Aricent collaboration is at its core a decentralized platform designed to help telecom operators develop and launch low-latency 5G mobile applications and services. It includes a software framework with features delivered through a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) model.

Android Leftovers