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Tuesday, 23 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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OSU celebrates success of Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

In order to celebrate 100 million downloads of Firefox, an open source Web browser distributed with the help of Oregon State University, a NASA weather balloon was launched from the Memorial Union Quad to about 100,000 feet at noon Saturday.

AMD is being Sued

Filed under
Legal

A CASE WAS FILED by Tessera alleging that AMD and its Spansion subsidiary have breached its patents.

Screenshots of Flock

Filed under
Software
-s

I've posted some screenshots of Flock 0.4.9 in the gallery if anyone is interested. In the short time testing Flock, I've found it to be a nice looking, stable firefox clone.

Review: Ubuntu 5.10 "Breezy Badger"

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

In the short time that I've spent using Ubuntu 5.10 (Breezy Badger), I've really come to like it. The installation was painless, all my hardware was detected and configured correctly, package management was easy, and the clean-cut GNOME desktop is terrific.

Doom Movie receives lackluster reviews

Filed under
Movies
-s

Seems the movie Doom based on the Doom series of video games is meeting with lukewarm reviews. Most state they find it tedious with too much talk and not enough action. I still want to see it, but I might wait for cable.

Opera Releases Browser Preview

Filed under
Software

The new version for Windows, Mac and Linux users includes improved e-mail and stability, support for additional Web standards, and changes to the user interface designed to make it easier to switch from Internet Explorer or Firefox.

Flock founder hopes new browser will fly with users

Filed under
Software

The Web has evolved very dramatically, but the evolution of Web browsers, however, have not been as significant. Flock hopes to change that by integrating more functionality into the browser, giving users easier access to the Web's social aspects.

More lawmakers back U.S. control of Internet

Filed under
Web

Three lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives called on Friday for the Internet's core infrastructure to remain under U.S. control, echoing similar language introduced in the Senate earlier this week.

Linux System Startup

Filed under
HowTos

If you usually run for a coffee refill while your computer is booting up, here's a look at what you're missing. For those perhaps new to Linux who want to know a bit more about their OS, this article looks inside the startup sequence of Linux on a PC.

Baseball Warns Against "Information Piracy" At World Series

Filed under
Humor

In a harshly worded statement, Major League Baseball reiterated its policy against the unlawful dissemination of game information without their express written consent. To enforce this edict, all cell phones, cameras, scorecards, abacusses, and all other devices capable of storing information will be banned from within two miles of all World Series games.

First Look at SUSE 10.0

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

SUSE has always been at the top of their game and judging by the numbers they still are. Is it worth the download? Is it worth our time? We're here to take a look....

Peru's president approves open-source bill

Filed under
OSS

The president of Peru, signed legislation this week that allows public institutions to consider adopting open-source software, another step forward for the open-software movement.

OpenOffice.org 2.0 Has Edge over Its StarOffice 8 Cousin

Filed under
OOo

When eWEEK Labs recently reviewed StarOffice 8, we were impressed by its broad platform support and low cost-two measures by which the Sun Microsystems Inc. office productivity suite edges out Microsoft Corp.'s market-leading Office 2003 but falls short compared with its open-source sibling, OpenOffice.org 2.0.

University traps infected PCs in its web

Filed under
OSS

A team of IT staffers at the University of Indianapolis last week showed off a bundle of open-source tools and scripts it uses to trap and isolate PCs infected by viruses or spyware.

LG3D-Livecd 2.3

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

A new concept is amongst us and lg3d is its name. I test drove the livecd this evening and I've never experienced anything quite like it before. I think this is an extremely bold and ambitious project. I hope they continue to improve this desktop because it is truly a one-of-a-kind. In a time when most distros follow a very similar formula, Looking Glass is going its own way.

Mandriva 2006.0

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

With the newest release, and all the hype of the merger with Conectiva and Lycoris, I felt it was time to take another look at Mandriva. Mandriva has delivered a fabulous, bleeding edge product in it's latest release. Unfortunately as has been the case with most Mandriva .0 releases the product is unstable and needing attention.

What do to when apt-get fails

Filed under
HowTos

When you install an application package in a Debian-based system, sometimes prerequisite application packages are unavailable. These missing packages are known as broken dependencies. Left unresolved, they can cripple your system's ability to install new packages.

The CUPS Printing System

Filed under
HowTos

CUPS is what its name says: a common UNIX printing system. This is a basic introduction to what CUPS is and why you might want to use it rather than LPD.

Sony awards prizes to university programming students

Filed under
Gaming

Sony Computer Entertainment has awarded prizes to three students using PlayStation2-Linux development kits donated by Sony.

Linux Kernel IPv6 Denial of Service Vulnerability

Filed under
Security

Tetsuo Handa has reported a vulnerability in the Linux Kernel, which potentially can be exploited by malicious, local users to cause a DoS.

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More in Tux Machines

Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Nautilus, a LTS and desktop icons

If you are following closely the news of various tech websites, one of the latest hot topic in the community was about Nautilus removing desktop icons. Let’s try to clarify some points to ensure the various discussions around it have enough background information and not reacting on emotions only as it could be seen lately. You will have both downstream (mine) and upstream (Carlos) perspectives here. Read more

Programming: Perl, JavaScript, Ick, PowerFake, pylint-django, nbdkit filters

  • An Open Letter to the Perl Community

    Some consider Perl 6 to be a sister language to Perl 5. Personally, I consider Perl 6 more of a genetically engineered daughter language with the best genes from many parents. A daughter with a difficult childhood, in which she alienated many, who is now getting out of puberty into early adulthood. But I digress.

  • Long Live Perl 5!

    While not mentioned in the original Letter, a frequent theme in the comments was that Perl 6 should be renamed, as the name is inaccurate or is damaging.

    This is the topic on which I wrote more than once and those who have been following closely know that, yes, many (but by no means all) in the Perl 6 community acknowledge the name is detrimental to both Perl 6 and Perl 5 projects.

    This is why with a nod of approval from Larry we're moving to create an alias to Perl 6 name during 6.d language release, to be available for marketing in areas where "Perl 6" is not a desirable name.

  • JavaScript Trends for 2018
    Trying to bet on how many new JavaScript frameworks will be released each month, is, the best software engineer’s game in the past 5 years.
  • Ick: a continuous integration system
    TL;DR: Ick is a continuous integration or CI system. See http://ick.liw.fi/ for more information.
  • Introducing PowerFake for C++
    PowerFake is a new mini-framework/tool to make it possible to fake/mock free functions and static & non-virtual member functions in C++. It requires no change to the code under test, but it might need some structural changes, like moving some parts of the code to a different .cpp file; or making inline functions non-inline when built for testing. It is useful for writing unit tests and faking/mocking functions which should not/cannot be run during a test case. Some say that such a feature is useful for existing code, but should not be needed for a code which is written testable from the beginning. But, personally I don’t agree that it is always appropriate to inject such dependencies using virtual interfaces or templates. Currently, it is not supposed to become a mocking framework on its own. I hope that I can integrate PowerFake into at least one existing C++ mocking framework. Therefore, currently it doesn’t provide anything beyond faking existing functions.
  • Introducing pylint-django 0.8.0
    Since my previous post was about writing pylint plugins I figured I'd let you know that I've released pylint-django version 0.8.0 over the weekend. This release merges all pull requests which were pending till now so make sure to read the change log.
  • nbdkit filters
    nbdkit is our toolkit for creating Network Block Device (NBD) servers from “unusual” data sources. nbdkit was already configurable by writing simple plugins in several programming languages. Last week Eric Blake and I added a nice new feature: You can now modify existing plugins by placing “filters” in front of them.

Moving to Linux from dated Windows machines

Every day, while working in the marketing department at ONLYOFFICE, I see Linux users discussing our office productivity software on the internet. Our products are popular among Linux users, which made me curious about using Linux as an everyday work tool. My old Windows XP-powered computer was an obstacle to performance, so I started reading about Linux systems (particularly Ubuntu) and decided to try it out as an experiment. Two of my colleagues joined me. Read more

Security: TPM, Yubikey, Holes, Bricking and Uber

  • Trusted Computing
    The Trusted Platform Module on your computer's motherboard could lead to better security for your Linux system. The security of any operating system (OS) layer depends on the security of every layer below it. If the CPU can't be trusted to execute code correctly, there's no way to run secure software on that CPU. If the bootloader has been tampered with, you cannot trust the kernel that the bootloader boots. Secure Boot allows the firmware to validate a bootloader before executing it, but if the firmware itself has been backdoored, you have no way to verify that Secure Boot functioned correctly.
  • Locking the screen when removing a Yubikey

    I have my Yubikey on my key ring, so whenever I leave my computer, I have to remove the Yubikey. So why not lock the screen automatically?

  • Corporate cultural issues hold back secure software development

    The study of over 1,200 IT leaders, conducted by analysts Freeform Dynamics for software company CA Technologies, finds 58 percent of respondents cite existing culture and lack of skills as hurdles to being able to embed security within processes.

  • Stop installing our buggy Spectre CPU firmware fixes, Intel says
  • Uber shrugs off flaw that lets hackers bypass two-factor authentication

    Security researcher Karan Saini found the bug in Uber's two-factor authentication process, which has yet to be rolled out widely to Uber users. The flaw relates to the way an account is authenticated when users log in, meaning hackers [sic] with someone's username and password can drift pass the 2FA with ease.