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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Torvalds: "Just Use KDE"

Filed under
KDE

Without tip-toeing around the matter, Linus Torvalds made his preference in the GNOME vs. KDE matter quite clear on the GNOME-usability list: "I personally just encourage people to switch to KDE.

Open Source - Is it a Valid Direction for You?

Filed under
OSS

There is a perception that Open Source products like the Linux operating system are rapidly replacing their paid-for commercial counterparts like Microsoft Windows.

CompAmerica Announces AX5, a Free “Windows-Like” Operating System

Filed under
OS

CompAmerica (http://www.compamerica.com) announces a free operating system option for its PCs that it claims “bears a reasonable resemblance” to Microsoft Windows XP and can cohabitate with Microsoft Windows XP on the same PC.

Open-source antivirus tech may get commercial help

Filed under
Software

To plug a hole in its intrusion-prevention product, eEye Digital Security may adopt the Clam AntiVirus project and improve the open-source software.

klik wins "Linux Format Hottest Pick" award

Filed under
Software

We got notified from the Linux Format (a printed magazine sold in UK newspaper stands) that they give their Hottest Pick award to klik. -- Woooohoo!

Quake 4 patch v1.0.5, Linux client/server v1.0.6 - patch

Filed under
Gaming

Id Software has released a new beta patches for Quake 4, bringing the Linux client/server to version 1.0.6.

Also: $2,000 Quake 4 tourney proposed

Closed, Open Source Share Compatibility Problems

Filed under
Software

Software stacks, open or closed, will always be dogged by backward-compatibility issues. Deal with it.

Packetstorm in a teacup; Firefox still secure

Filed under
Moz/FF
Security

The first exploit for Mozilla Firefox 1.5 was discovered by Packetstorm last week. However initial reports that Packetstorm's hack could completely disable Firefox seem grossly exaggerated.

Linux Shortcuts and Commands

Filed under
HowTos

This is a practical selection of the commands we use most often. On my small home system, it says there are 2595 executables on my PATH. Many of these "commands" can be accessed from your favourite GUI front-end, by clicking on the right menu or button. They can all be run from the command line.

Preventing Buffer Overflow Exploits Using the Linux

Filed under
Security

Internet servers (such as Web, email, and ftp servers) have been the target for different kinds of attacks aiming to disable them from providing services to their respective users.

Dual-core desktop duel: AMD vs. Intel

Filed under
Hardware

What would the results of a dual-core desktop CPU fight look like? To answer the question once and for all, we set ourselves to a no-holds-barred dual-core desktop CPU fistfight.

Considering the Misuse of Open Source

Filed under
OSS

As open-source software spreads to personal computers, servers and Internet networking equipment around the world, so, too, is the misuse of the rules governing the software.

LinuxWorld Boston mulls "invisible Linux" pavilion

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld Boston 2006 organizers say the "Invisible Linux" pavilion, currently at the "concept" stage, could help surface the use of Linux and open source in devices and embedded applications, given sufficient exhibitor interest.

Minding your P's and Q's with Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Open source compliance continues to be difficult issue, often compounded by the large and varied range of licenses that governed the use of the software that may come with the kind of strings attached that you may not realize.

Big Vole is watching you

Filed under
Microsoft

CUDDLY SOFTWARE giant Microsoft will use its new Windows Live geolocation finder as a Big Brother location device for the police.

REVIEW SUSE Linux 10.0

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

The Holy Grail of Linux is to be so easy to install and use that the technologically illiterate can do it. The penguin community is working feverishly to this goal, which would give Microsoft's Windows a run for its money.

It's almost there.

Will Linux take the lead in server virtualization?

Filed under
Linux

For server vendors such as Dell, Linux is a good thing because it lowers acquisition costs for customers. It's easier for a customer to commit to deploying a new server when software license fees are removed from the equation.

First looks: Ark Linux 2005.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Speaking of Ark Linux 2005.2, DistroWatch has included a "first look" in their Distrowatch Weekly. Overall they liked it, but admit it's still not quite ready to be called "beginner-friendly"

Qt4 on its way into Portage

Filed under
Gentoo

In this weeks Gentoo Weekly Newsletter we find Qt4 is starting to be marked unstable on various architectures. So it begins...

CLI Magic: Daily aliases

Filed under
HowTos

If you spend any time working at the shell, you probably use many GNU utilities. One thing that distinguishes the GNU versions from the classic Unix versions is that the GNU programs are rife with additional options. Some of these options are so useful you may want to create an alias so you can use them all the time without needing to do all the extra typing.

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Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.

FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown (and Hugs)

  • FreeBSD Finally Gets Mitigated For Spectre & Meltdown
    Landing in FreeBSD today was the mitigation work for the Meltdown and Spectre CPU vulnerabilities. It's taken a few more weeks longer than most of the Linux distributions to be re-worked for Spectre/Meltdown mitigation as well as DragonFlyBSD, but with FreeBSD Revision 329462 it appears their initial fixes are in place. There is Meltdown mitigation for Intel CPUs via a KPTI implementation similar to Linux, the Kernel Page Table Isolation. There is also a PCID (Process Context Identifier) optimization for Intel Westmere CPUs and newer, just as was also done on Linux.
  • FreeBSD outlaws virtual hugs
  • AsiaBSDCon 2018 Conference Programme

Linux: To recurse or not

Linux and recursion are on very good speaking terms. In fact, a number of Linux command recurse without ever being asked while others have to be coaxed with just the right option. When is recursion most helpful and how can you use it to make your tasks easier? Let’s run through some useful examples and see. Read more