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Sunday, 15 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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CLI Magic: Make instant Web banners from the command line

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes you might have a need to make an image file consisting mostly of text -- to use as a banner on a Web page, for instance. You can always make the banner in an image editor, but there's a much quicker way -- one that lends itself to automatic generation from scripts using arbitrary text.

Survey Indicates Better Grades for Open Source in UK Universities

Filed under
OSS

A new survey hosted by the University of Oxford indicates that the use of open source software is on the increase at further and higher educational establishments in the UK.

LinuxWorld shows move to mainstream - minus Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Fifteen years after the introduction of the Linux kernel, next week's LinuxWorld conference will focus not on whether to use open source software - the market has answered that question - but on how to deploy, secure and manage the technology as part of a business IT operation.

Microsoft says Open source is too complex

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Microsoft

Although open-source software can be customized to meet a company's specific needs, its inherent complexity could dent the profitability of independent software vendors (ISVs), says Microsoft.

TransGaming’s Cider Brings PC Games to the Mac (and Linux?)

Filed under
Gaming

linux-gamers.net reported that faithful Transgaming subscribers are up-in-arms over the announcement of Transgaming Cider engine for intel Macs and if their subscription fees were spent for this. However, realtechnews reports this development will benefit Linux users as well.

Systemsettings usability work for Kubuntu's Eft

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Ubuntu

One of the more unique features of Kubuntu is that it ships with a replacement for the standard KDE Control Center program, called systemsettings. For the coming Edgy Eft release, Ellen of OpenUsability.org fame has done a card sorting experiment with real users and in the last week I've taken Ellen's changes and implemented them.

KBFX Becomes a Utility Menu ::Preview for 0.4.9.5

Filed under
KDE

in the new version of kbfx "Code named kbfxPlasma-kde3," Kbfx now supports a data interface where it loads it's data from plugins..separating GUI from Data, water effect with some coloring, and now the Aritist has the FULL controll over where each widget should be placed and it's geometry.

AM2 and MythTV war stories, a continuing saga

Filed under
Linux

Warning to Linux users who want to upgrade to socket AM2 motherboards: You will almost definitely run into problems with Linux. I have an ASUS M2N32-SLI Deluxe motherboard.

Linux Technology Leadership and the Forking Issue

Filed under
Linux

Linux is the fastest-growing embedded operating environment in the world today. It's quickly becoming the single largest operating system platform for embedded computing. As a result, many technology managers must come to grips with the complexity and the dynamics of Open Source software in general and Linux evolution in particular.

Six steps to secure sensitive data in MySQL

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HowTos

If you're using MySQL, there are some easy things you can do to secure your systems and significantly reduce the risk of unauthorized access to your sensitive data.

Setting up a DNS zone with Bind9

Filed under
HowTos

Bind is a well known Unix name server, it is a powerfull piece of software which is used by the majority of nameservers. This article will go though setting up a local area network that can be used at home or inside a small company.

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Novell turns its focus toward growth

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Interviews
SUSE

When Ron Hovsepian was named chief operating officer of Waltham's Novell Inc. in November, investors were already calling for the ouster of then-chief executive Jack Messman. In June, Messman's critics got their wish, and Hovsepian got one of the toughest jobs in the software industry. Hovsepian recently spoke with Globe reporter Hiawatha Bray on how he expects to meet the challenge that defeated his former boss.

$100 laptop shrinks tech gap

Filed under
OLPC

Some pretty stunning video of the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project's distinctive orange clam-shelled case with a fat antenna sticking up on each side of the color screen came out of the Red Hat Linux meeting in San Francisco on Friday.

Is free software “communist”? Maybe yes...

Filed under
OSS

Some prominent people have called free software “communist” in an attempt to bring Cold War bugaboos to bear against the movement—a kind of “nuclear option” of FUD. I remember the paranoia of the Cold War personally, and I thought then (and I still do now) that it was “just stupid”.

Virtualization Breaks Out

Filed under
Software

What's all the fuss about virtual machines? From AMD to Intel, Microsoft to Novell to Red Hat, every major OS and hardware platform vendor today has a stake in the virtualization game. However, the truth is that running multiple virtual systems on a single physical workstation or server is simply passe.

Closing lid and screen blank on Dell Latitude 110L

Filed under
HowTos

My Dell Latitude 110L test box has a really annoying issue: closing the lid and reopening it makes the screen stay blank (without freezing the system). A wiki about DellLatitude110L and a Dell Latitude 110L & Gentoo Linux article pointed me to a workaround.

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More in Tux Machines

Today in Techrights

today's leftovers

Linux Kernel/Foundation

  • Linux Foundation Brings Power of Open Source to Energy Sector
    The Linux Foundation launched on July 12 its latest effort—LF Energy, an open-source coalition for the energy and power management sector. The LF Energy coalition is being backed by French transmission system operation RTE, Vanderbilt University and the European Network of Transmission System Operators (ENTSO-E). With LF Energy, the Linux Foundation is aiming to replicate the success it has seen in other sectors, including networking, automotive, financial services and cloud computing.
  • Marek Squeezes More Performance Out Of RadeonSI In CPU-Bound Scenarios
    AMD's leading open-source RadeonSI Gallium3D developer, Marek Olšák, sent out a new patch series this week aiming to benefit this Radeon OpenGL driver's performance in CPU-bound scenarios. The patch series is a set of command submission optimizations aimed to help trivial CPU-bound benchmarks to varying extents. In the very trivial glxgears, the patch series is able to improve the maximum frame-rates by around 10%.
  • Intel Sends In A Final Batch Of DRM Feature Updates Targeting Linux 4.19
    After several big feature pull requests of new "i915" Intel DRM driver features landing in DRM-Next for Linux 4.19, the Intel open-source developers have sent in what they believe to be their last batch of feature changes for queuing this next kernel cycle.

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source governance accelerates innovation [Ed: Evolution of the tactics by which anti-FOSS proprietary software firms, Sonatype in this case, try to sell their 'wares']
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 brings unified search of cloud and local
  • GitHub Enterprise 2.14 is ‘open goodness’ behind an enterprise firewall
  • DragonFly BSD Lead Developer Preaches The Blessing Of SSDs
    DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has provided an update on the open-source operating system project's infrastructure and acknowledging the SSD upgrades that are noticeably beneficial over HDDs. DragonFlyBSD has recently been replacing various HDDs with SSDs in their build machines and other systems having an important presence in their infrastructure. Following these storage upgrades, things have been running great and ultimately should deliver a snappier experience for users and developers.
  • Binutils 2.31 Offers Faster DLL Linking For Cygwin/Mingw, Freescale S12Z Support
    A new release of the Binutils collection of important tools is now available with a number of new features and improvements. Binutils 2.31 contains work like direct linking with DLLs for Cygwin/Mingw targets now being faster, AArch64 disassembler improvements, MIPS GINV and CRC extension support, Freescale S12Z architecture support, the x86 assembler now supports new command line options to enable alternative shorter instruction encodings, and the Gold linker now supports Intel Indirect Branch Tracking and Shadow Stack instructions.
  • GCC 8/9 Land Fix For "-march=native" Tuning On Modern Intel CPUs
    The other day we reported on a GCC 8 regression where Skylake and newer CPUs with "-march=native" haven't been performance as optimally as they should be. Fortunately, that patch was quickly landed into the GCC SVN/Git code for GCC 9 as well as back-ported to GCC 8. In the GCC 8.1 release and mainline code since April, as the previous article outlined, when using "-march=native" as part of the compiler flags with GCC the full capabilities of the CPU haven't been leveraged. This affects Intel Skylake CPUs and newer generations, including yet to be released hardware like Cannonlake and Icelake.
  • ARM Kills Its RISC-V FUD Website After Staff Revolt
    ARM is under fire for the way it attempted to kneecap a fledgling open-source hardware project, and has retreated from its own line of attack after several days. ARM had launched a website, riscv-basics.com, which purported to offer “real” information on the rival ISA. As one might expect, the “information” on display was a bit less neutral than a visitor might hope for. Taking this kind of shot against an open-source hardware project also struck many in the OSS community as being in exceptionally poor taste, given how critical open source software has been to ARM’s overall success and visibility. First, a bit of background: RISC-V is an open-source ISA based on RISC principles and is intended to eventually provide flexible CPU cores for a wide variety of use-cases. By using the BSD license, the RISC-V teams hope to allow for a greater range of projects that support both open and proprietary CPU designs. RISC-V CPUs are already available today in a range of roles and capabilities. Despite some modest initial success, RISC-V, today, isn’t even a rounding error in CPU marketshare measurements. It’s certainly no threat to ARM, which enjoys the mother of all vendor lock-ins measured in per-device terms.
  • Python boss Guido van Rossum steps down after 30 years
     

    He lays out a list of things that the users will need to consider going forwards like who has banning rights and who inducts noobs to the core developer team, but its laid out in a context of ‘do what you want but keep me out of it'.  

    "I'll still be here, but I'm trying to let you all figure something out for yourselves. I'm tired, and need a very long break."