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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 16 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 10:10am
Story AMD Press Talks Up Major Open-Source Linux Driver Features Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 8:21am
Story Linux-based platform aims to speed M2M development Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 8:10am
Story Reven meets Kickstarter Goal, headed for Linux Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 8:07am
Story Hello, MS-Android. Good-bye, Windows Phone Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 8:04am
Story Rikomagic MK902 LE is an ARM-based Linux PC Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 8:03am
Story Linux snapshot: Pay rates and employers with the most job ads Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 8:01am
Story Storage on a budget: GlusterFS shines in open source storage test Roy Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 7:58am
Story LXC 1.0.0 release announcement Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 7:53am
Story My Comments as Posted to the UK Cabinet Office Standards Hub (now it's your turn) Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2014 - 7:41am

Songs in the Key of Tux: KGuitar

Filed under
Software

As well as palm muting, KGuitar has a number of great features. It's able to import Guitar Pro files, up to version 4; it has a visual fretboard, so you can see how a chord would look on the guitar neck; a chord analyser (like Guitar Pro's) that gives you a choice of fingerings based on a chord name, or provides you with chord names for a chord you input; and, a feature that seems to be unique to KGuitar: the ability to tap the rhythm of a bar using the mouse or keyboard.

Ohio Linuxfest A Success!

Filed under
Linux

If you didn't make it to the Ohio Linuxfest this past weekend you missed a great time. With speakers like John "Maddog" Hall, Jeff Waugh and Chris DiBona not to mention vendors like Novell, IBM, RedHat, and Sun, there was a something for everyone at Ohio Linuxfest this year.

XFCE to have Transparent future

Filed under
Software

Not being able to set my mind to doing anything useful, I played a little with rgba windows. For a future version of Xfce that can depend on cairo-based versions of Gtk, it should be possible to only make the panel background transparent, while keeping text and icons fully opaque.

UHU-Linux 2.0: The Bilingual Owl, Smart & Savvy

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Like I said last Friday, UHU-Linux 2.0 was released as the first version (the fourth in its history, after 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2) to support the English language as an extra to Hungarian. Some people liked even Test 2 — let's see now what we got in the final release.

Mandriva Linux Whiffs on Virtualization Integration

Filed under
MDV

With its Corporate Server 4, Mandriva is challenging the Linux data center operating systems from Red Hat and Novell by offering broader support for virtualization technologies. It's a solid-sounding plan, but eWEEK Labs' tests of CS 4 show that it's longer on ambition than execution.

First Look: Kubuntu Edgy Eft Beta

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I'm breaking with tradition at Tectonic. We usually review Ubuntu, the Gnome desktop version from the Canonical/Ubuntu team that brought us winning operating systems like Warty Warthog, Hoary Hedgehog, and Breezy Badger. And, according to my last review, a loser like Dapper Drake. This time I'm reviewing Kubuntu Edgy Eft, the KDE version of the latest Ubuntu release.

Developers Gather for ODF Day at the KDE Community aKademy 2006 Conference

Filed under
KDE

Open source software developers, joined by Intel and IBM technical staff, exchange knowledge and plan ODF supporting projects; OpenDocument Developer Kit proposed.

Yahoo Opens Yahoo Mail to Open Source Developers

Filed under
Software

The largest Internet media company in the world, Yahoo, announced recently that it will open its e-mail program for outside developers, a move that marks the beginning of a new era for the Sunnyvale-based giant.

lightweight load, memory and network monitoring Using loadavg

Filed under
HowTos

loadavg is a simple and lightweight method of monitoring load, memory usage and transfer throughput on a Linux server. Every method of monitoring has an impact on the system being monitored — loadavg is designed to keep that impact as low as possible.

RPLinux: China's Answer to the $100 PC

Filed under
Linux

A while back, I stumbled upon something called the Municator PC from YellowSheepRiver Municator, Inc. At first, I thought this had to be yet another hoax, but as I looked deeper into it, I found out that China has done a fairly nice job of taking the distribution, known as RPLinux, and integrating it with Chinese made hardware.

CLI Magic: Customize your comics with dailystrips

Filed under
HowTos

Here's a handy Perl script to automate a critical part of your daily routine. dailystrips can help fetch your favorite Internet comic strips in time for you to enjoy them with your first cup of coffee, without your having to surf for them.

Steps to get Audio to work in Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Etch is a very good Linux distribution. It has all the latest versions of software - even more recent than those found in Ubuntu Dapper. Recently when I downloaded and installed the latest version of Debian Etch Beta 3, every thing went quite smoothly. But... I ran into a problem.

Upgrade to Banshee 0.11.0 on SLED10

Filed under
HowTos

A few weeks before releasing iTunes 7, Apple rolled out a firmware update for iPod devices. The update rendered obsolete a key library for using Banshee with your iPod. ) So here is where we will step in and try to make ourselves useful by explaining how to update a SLED10 system (and probably an openSUSE system, as well) to the latest version of Banshee.

One Laptop Update

Filed under
OLPC

I wrote up a long update on where we are in the software and hardware for the One Laptop per Child project. We’ve gotten a lot done, but I don’t think that’s been communicated to the outside world very well. So, for the first time, here’s an update of where we are. Hopefully I’ll be able to do this on a regular basis.

Kernel

TUX Issue #18 Now Available

Filed under
Linux

Issue number 18, October 2006, of TUX now is available. Some highlights include: Installing Enigmail in Thunderbird, Migrating from Microsoft Outlook to KMail, Thunderbird beyond the Basics, and SuperKaramba.

Internet guru relishes NZ connections

Filed under
Web

Internet architect Roy Fielding gets back to New Zealand less often than he would like, but his Kiwi connection lives on in his latest project.

How can I watch videos in Firefox on Linux?

Filed under
HowTos

One of the things I like to do is watching videos on the Internet inside my browser. Doing so on Unix systems is not complicated and only requires a plugin. In this tutorial we will learn how to do it on CentOS with Gnome and Firefox.

What to tune in MySQL Server after installation

Filed under
HowTos

My favorite question during Interview for people to work as MySQL DBAs or be involved with MySQL Performance in some way is to ask them what should be tuned in MySQL Server straight after installation, assuming it was installed with default settings. I’m surprised how many people fail to provide any reasonable answer to this question.

Java install on Linux is pants

Filed under
Software

SUN MICROSYSTEMS says it's serious about Java on Linux. But the process of installing the Java runtime leaves a lot to be desired, and here is why.

Also: Java: Money, Freedom and Open Source

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • 8 hurdles IT must overcome if they want open source success
    Open source software has the potential to drive innovation and collaboration across an enterprise, and can transform the way developers work together. "Open source is now part of the evaluation criteria when deciding on a software platform, so much so that it is expected," said Matt Ingenthron, senior director of engineering at Couchbase. "In this way, open source has somewhat faded into the background in a positive way. Just like no consumer would inquire if a mobile phone had internet access or text messaging, choosing an open source solution is almost always an option."
  • Sprint calls on open source analytics to prevent cyberfraud
    Mobile phone-related fraud is big business. Fraudsters, hackers, and other bad actors employ creative techniques to compromise networks, hijack user information, and piece together customer identities that are then sold for big bucks on the dark web. To protect its customers, Sprint needed to transform the way it detected and blocked fraudulent activity. “In the mobile phone business, there’s no markup on selling devices — our bread and butter is the network and the services that are delivered on that network, through the devices,” says Scott Rice, CIO of Sprint. “Identity theft is a huge problem and the ability for nefarious actors to use that theft of information to impersonate our customers means we were eating the costs of the devices and the costs of services delivery.”
  • Open Source Platform Delivers LDAP Integration
    The latest release of InfluxData, an open source platform for metrics, events, and other time series data, adds LDAP integration, new advanced analytics, and self-healing capabilities in the time series database platform. According to the company, time series data, collected and stored with InfluxData’s Time Series database platform is integral to observability and is becoming mission critical for organizations. Enhancements to InfluxEnterprise make it easier for administrators to keep this mission critical data available and secure by checking and verifying every requested action. This includes creating databases, storing data and running queries – against a user’s stored authorizations and role.
  • YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition Release: Free and Open Source
    The YOYOW-WeCenter Special Edition, customized and developed by YOYOW and based on WeCenter Q&A community framework, has been released on GitHub. Compared to regular WeCenter frameworks, YOYOW is providing free open source services and will be continually iterating products and will be introducing an incentive mechanism. Each Q&A community can directly integrate into YOYOW's bottom layer network and enjoy the network services provided by YOYOW.
  • Add-on Recommended By Mozilla Caught Logging Users’ Browsing History
    According to the reports by Mike Kuketz, an independent security blogger from Germany and uBlock Origin, an add-on named “Web Security” has been caught collecting users’ browsing history. [...] Soon after this discovery by Hill, Kuketz added a post on his blog about the same extension pointing to the same strange behavior of the add-on. A user on Kuketz’s blog decoded the garbled data and found that the add-on was collecting users’ browsing history and sending it to a German server.
  • Zombies: Top 5 Open Source Vulnerabilities That Refuse To Die [Ed: Microsoft partner WhiteSource continues to stigmatise FOSS as a security nightmare, using bugs branded by other Microsoft partner for extra panic]
  • How a civic hacker used open data to halve tickets at Chicago's most confusing parking spot
    Matt Chapman used the Freedom of Information Act to get the City of Chicago's very mess parking ticket data; after enormous and heroic data normalization, Chapman was able to pinpoint one of the city's most confusing parking spots, between 1100-1166 N State St, which cycled between duty as a taxi-stand and a parking spot with a confusingly placed and semi-busted parking meter. After surveying the site and deducing the problem, Chapman contacted the alderman responsible for that stretch of North State Street, and, eight months later, the signage was cleaned up and made more intuitive. Followup data analysis showed that Chapman's work had halved the number of parking tickets issued on the spot, with 600-odd fewer tickets in the past 20 months, for a savings of $60,000 to Chicago motorists.
  • Bluespec, Inc. Releases a New Family of Open-Source RISC-V Processors
    Bluespec Inc. has released Piccolo, its first in a family of RISC-V open-source processors provided as a vehicle for open innovation in embedded systems. Piccolo is a 3-stage RV32IM processor whose small “footprint” is ideal for many IoT applications. The repository (https://github.com/bluespec/Piccolo) contains a royalty-free synthesizable Verilog core that can be easily integrated and deployed into an ASIC or FPGA. Bluespec, Inc. will actively maintain Piccolo. It also offers commercial-grade tools for the customization and verification of RISC-V cores. Configurations will be continually added to provide the full spectrum of embedded controller features. Companies or universities interested in contributing to the Piccolo project should contact Bluespec, Inc. (add contact – RISC-V open source support).

KDE Applications 18.08 Open-Source Software Suite Released, Here's What's New

Being in development for the past several months, KDE Applications 18.08 goes stable today and will hit the software repositories of various popular GNU/Linux distributions during the next few days. This is a major release and brings numerous new features and improvements across multiple apps, including Dolphin, Konsole, Gwenview, KMail, Akonadi, Cantor, Spectacle, and others. "We continuously work on improving the software included in our KDE Application series, and we hope you will find all the new enhancements and bug fixes useful," reads today's announcement. "More than 120 bugs have been resolved in applications including the Kontact Suite, Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, Kate, Konsole, Okular, Spectacle, Umbrello and more!" Read more

Security Leftovers

  • How to Protect Your PC From the Intel Foreshadow Flaws
  • AT&T Sued After SIM Hijacker Steals $24 Million in Customer's Cryptocurrency
    It has only taken a few years, but the press, public and law enforcement appear to finally be waking up to the problem of SIM hijacking. SIM hijacking (aka SIM swapping or a "port out scam") involves a hacker hijacking your phone number, porting it over to their own device (often with a wireless carrier employee's help), then taking control of your personal accounts. As we've been noting, the practice has heated up over the last few years, with countless wireless customers saying their entire identities were stolen after thieves ported their phone number to another carrier, then took over their private data. Sometimes this involves selling valuable Instagram account names for bitcoin; other times it involves clearing out the target's banking or cryptocurrency accounts. Case in point: California authorities recently brought the hammer down on one 20-year-old hacker, who had covertly ported more than 40 wireless user accounts, in the process stealing nearly $5 million in bitcoin. One of the problems at the core of this phenomenon is that hackers have either tricked or paid wireless carrier employees to aid in the hijacking, or in some instances appear to have direct access to (apparently) poorly-secured internal carrier systems. That has resulted in lawsuits against carriers like T-Mobile for not doing enough to police their own employees, the unauthorized access of their systems, or the protocols utilized to protect consumer accounts from this happening in the first place.
  • Voting Machine Vendors, Election Officials Continue To Look Ridiculous, As Kids Hack Voting Machines In Minutes
  • Security updates for Thursday