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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Flashback: The Future of the Web 1995-Style srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 5:21pm
Story Jokosher: A Completely Kosher Audio Multitool srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:44pm
Story Space Exploration Gets Open Sourced srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:42pm
Story Web browsers safer than you think srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:41pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 7:48am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 7:37am
Story Mageia 1 Review srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:59am
Story The Subverted GPL srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:58am
Story LibreOffice Developer Glimpse Proves Balance srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:56am
Story Matt Asay FUDs Google srlinuxx 03/08/2011 - 4:55am

Microsoft Acquires Linux

Filed under
Humor

REDMOND, Wash. - Mar. 31, 2005 -- Linus Torvalds, on behalf of all Linux users, has entered into a sales agreement with Microsoft valued at 1.4 billion US Dollars.

Gentoo on the NT kernel

Filed under
Gentoo
Humor

If we allow ourselves to think out of the box, we will realize that the Microsoft NT kernel is an alternative to Linux, that is both proven and commercial-grade. It has support from nearly all hardware vendors in the world, and practically every PC comes with an license for the NT kernel. This means: the monetary cost of a copy of the NT kernel is close to non-existent for the average end-user.

Open source to draw up ethical standards

Filed under
OSS

The Open Source Consortium has established a professional and ethical standards taskforce examining areas traditionally associated with professional standards, such as quality control and project management.

Fill Out Survey - Win an IPod

Filed under
Misc

ZDNet UK is launching the IT Priorities reader research programme for 2005 and needs your help - in return you could win an iPod.

Forty years of Moore's Law

Filed under
Hardware
Misc

Forty years ago, Electronics Magazine asked Intel co-founder Gordon Moore to write an article summarizing the state of the electronics industry. The article outlined what became known as Moore's Law.

The Well celebrates 20th birthday

Filed under
Web

One of the oldest and most celebrated online communities is celebrating its 20th birthday on Friday.

NVIDIA Version: 1.0-7174 released

Filed under
Software

Due to wide spread issues with 1.0-7167, NVIDIA has quickly released 1.0-7174. According to the changelog some highlights include:

Living will software sales surge

Filed under
Software

Sales of computer software to create living wills are surging amid the high-profile debate over Terri Schiavo, the severely brain-damaged Florida woman who died Thursday.

More Google Goodies

Filed under
Web

Starting today, we're beginning the roll-out of our new and top secret Infinity+1 storage plan. The key features are:

Quench your thirst for knowledge

Filed under
Humor

At Google our mission is to organize the world's information and make it useful and accessible to our users. But any piece of information's usefulness derives, to a depressing degree, from the cognitive ability of the user who's using it. That's why we're pleased to announce Google Gulp (BETA)™ with Auto-Drink™ (LIMITED RELEASE), a line of "smart drinks" designed to maximize your surfing efficiency by making you more intelligent, and less thirsty.

Origins of April Fools Day

Filed under
Misc

Do you know the origin of April Fools Day? It is believed to have started in France, but the British are credited with bringing it to the US.

Microsoft Issues Warning Against April Fool's Day Jokes

Filed under
Humor

REDMOND, WASHINGTON -- In a harshly worded statement, Microsoft today warned that the company would "aggressively defend its trademarks against any unauthorized April Fool's Day jokes, parodies, satires, hoaxes, lampoons, gags, japes, capers, pranks, larks, farces, wisecracks, frolics, mockeries, takeoffs, send ups, humor items, or fake news stories."

No Comdex this year?

Filed under
Hardware
Sci/Tech

No Comdex 2005 IT trade show this November in Las Vegas? No problem, according to IT users interviewed after yesterday's announcement that this year's event is off. It's the second year in a row Comdex has been canceled. One past attendee said Comdex had become a 'flea market'

WordPress Under Fire for Search-Engine Spamming

Filed under
Software
Web

One of the most popular Weblog-publishing tools, WordPress, is stirring a controversy over search-engine gaming because it included thousands of articles related to popular search terms on its Web site while largely hiding them from site visitors.

Shame on them!

Brain chip reads man's thoughts

Filed under
Sci/Tech
Misc

A paralysed man in the US has become the first person to benefit from a brain chip that reads his mind.

Google plans to double Gmail capacity

Filed under
Web

Google plans to offer a bottomless cup of storage with its Gmail Web-based e-mail service, dramatically raising the bar for rivals in the sharply competitive business for the second time in a year.

Internet Music Theft Likely To Survive

Filed under
Web
Legal

Justices appeared divided, both worried that new lawsuits could stunt the next iPod, and also deeply troubled by what they see as Grokster's efforts to encourage rampant Internet piracy and profit from it. However they rule, it's unlikely to solve once and for all, internet copyright issues, say observers.

Naomi Campbell 'beat assistant with PDA'

Filed under
Hardware

Supermodel Naomi Campbell has angrily rejected US reports that she assaulted a personal assistant with a PDA. The 34-year-old catwalk babe and author is alleged to have set about her PA with a Blackberry during a jaunt to Rio de Janeiro.

'Game theft' led to fatal attack

Filed under
Gaming
Legal

Shanghai gamer Qiu Chengwei killed player Zhu Caoyuan when he discovered he had sold a "dragon sabre" he had been loaned, said the china Daily.

Mr Chengwei only got the powerful virtual weapon shortly before it was sold for 7,200 yuan (£460) or about $800US.

Before the attack Mr Chengwei told police about the theft who said the weapon was not real property.

Hollywood seeks iTunes for film

Filed under
Movies
Sci/Tech

In other movie news, Sony Pictures Digital Entertainment is trying to develop and own the next iTunes--but for films.

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: DockerCon Coverage, MongoDB IPO

  • DockerCon EU 17 Panel Debates Docker Container Security
    There are many different security capabilities that are part of the Docker container platform, and there are a number of vendors providing container security offerings. At the DockerCon EU 17 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, eWEEK moderated a panel of leading vendors—Docker, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Aqua Security, Twistlock and StackRox—to discuss the state of the market. To date, there have been no publicly disclosed data breaches attributed to container usage or flaws. However, that doesn't mean that organizations using containers have not been attacked. In fact, Wei Lien Dang, product manager at StackRox, said one of his firm's financial services customers did have a container-related security incident.
  • DockerCon EU: Tips and Tools for Running Container Workloads on AWS
    Amazon Web Services wants to be a welcome home for developers and organizations looking to deploy containers. At the DockerCon EU conference here, a pair of AWS technical evangelists shared their wisdom on the best ways to benefit from container deployments. The terms microservices and containers are often used interchangeably by people. Abby Fuller, technical evangelist at AWS, provided the definition of microservices coined by Adrian Crockford, VP of Cloud Architecture at AWS and formerly the cloud architect at Netflix.
  • Docker CEO: Embracing Kubernetes Removes Conflict
    Steve Singh has ambitious plans for Docker Inc. that are nothing less than transforming the world of legacy applications into a modern cloud-native approach. Singh was named CEO of Docker on May 2 and hosted his first DockerCon event here Oct. 16-19. The highlight of DockerCon EU was the surprise announcement that Docker is going to support the rival open-source Kubernetes container orchestration system. In a video interview with eWEEK, Singh explained the rationale behind the Kubernetes support and provided insight into his vision for the company he now leads.
  • MongoDB's IPO Beats the Market Out of the Gate
    The folks at MongoDB raised a whole lot of money today in their debut on NASDAQ. Yesterday the open source company announced it was going to be asking $24 a share for the 8 million Class A shares it was letting loose in its IPO, which had some Wall Street investors scratching their heads and wondering if the brains at Mongo were suffering from some kind of undiagnosed damage. Analysts had been estimating an opening price of between $20-22 per share, and on October 6 the company had estimated an opening price in the range of $18-20.

LWN on Linux: LTS, API, Pointer Leaks and Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC)

  • Cramming features into LTS kernel releases
    While the 4.14 development cycle has not been the busiest ever (12,500 changesets merged as of this writing, slightly more than 4.13 at this stage of the cycle), it has been seen as a rougher experience than its predecessors. There are all kinds of reasons why one cycle might be smoother than another, but it is not unreasonable to wonder whether the fact that 4.14 is a long-term support (LTS) release has affected how this cycle has gone. Indeed, when he released 4.14-rc3, Linus Torvalds complained that this cycle was more painful than most, and suggested that the long-term support status may be a part of the problem. A couple of recent pulls into the mainline highlight the pressures that, increasingly, apply to LTS releases. As was discussed in this article, the 4.14 kernel will include some changes to the kernel timer API aimed at making it more efficient, more like contemporary in-kernel APIs, and easier to harden. While API changes are normally confined to the merge window, this change was pulled into the mainline for the 4.14-rc3 release. The late merge has led to a small amount of grumbling in the community.
  • Improving the kernel timers API
    The kernel's timer interface has been around for a long time, and its API shows it. Beyond a lack of conformance with current in-kernel interface patterns, the timer API is not as efficient as it could be and stands in the way of ongoing kernel-hardening efforts. A late addition to the 4.14 kernel paves the way toward a wholesale change of this API to address these problems.
  • What's the best way to prevent kernel pointer leaks?
    An attacker who seeks to compromise a running kernel by overwriting kernel data structures or forcing a jump to specific kernel code must, in either case, have some idea of where the target objects are in memory. Techniques like kernel address-space layout randomization have been created in the hope of denying that knowledge, but that effort is wasted if the kernel leaks information about where it has been placed in memory. Developers have been plugging pointer leaks for years but, as a recent discussion shows, there is still some disagreement over the best way to prevent attackers from learning about the kernel's address-space layout. There are a number of ways for a kernel pointer value to find its way out to user space, but the most common path by far is the printk() function. There are on the order of 50,000 printk() calls in the kernel, any of which might include the value of a kernel pointer. Other places in the kernel use the underlying vsprintf() mechanism to format data for virtual files; they, too, often leak pointer values. A blanket ban on printing pointer values could solve this problem — if it could be properly enforced — but it would also prevent printing such values when they are really needed. Debugging kernel problems is one obvious use case for printing pointers, but there are others.
  • Continuous-integration testing for Intel graphics
    Two separate talks, at two different venues, give us a look into the kinds of testing that the Intel graphics team is doing. Daniel Vetter had a short presentation as part of the Testing and Fuzzing microconference at the Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC). His colleague, Martin Peres, gave a somewhat longer talk, complete with demos, at the X.Org Developers Conference (XDC). The picture they paint is a pleasing one: there is lots of testing going on there. But there are problems as well; that amount of testing runs afoul of bugs elsewhere in the kernel, which makes the job harder. Developing for upstream requires good testing, Peres said. If the development team is not doing that, features that land in the upstream kernel will be broken, which is not desirable. Using continuous-integration (CI) along with pre-merge testing allows the person making a change to make sure they did not break anything else in the process of landing their feature. That scales better as the number of developers grows and it allows developers to concentrate on feature development, rather than bug fixing when someone else finds the problem. It also promotes a better understanding of the code base; developers learn more "by breaking stuff", which lets them see the connections and dependencies between different parts of the code.

An update on GnuPG

The GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG) is one of the fundamental tools that allows a distributed group to have trust in its communications. Werner Koch, lead developer of GnuPG, spoke about it at Kernel Recipes: what's in the new 2.2 version, when older versions will reach their end of life, and how development will proceed going forward. He also spoke at some length on the issue of best-practice key management and how GnuPG is evolving to assist. It is less than three years since attention was focused on the perilous position of GnuPG; because of systematic failure of the community to fund its development, Koch was considering packing it all in. The Snowden revelations persuaded him to keep going a little longer, then in the wake of Heartbleed there was a resurgent interest in funding the things we all rely on. Heartbleed led to the founding of the Core Infrastructure Initiative (CII). A grant from CII joined commitments from several companies and other organizations and an upsurge in community funding has put GnuPG on a more secure footing going forward. Read more

Ubuntu: GNOME, New Video, Ubuntu Podcast, Refreshing the Xubuntu Logo

  • Ubuntu 17.10: We're coming GNOME! Plenty that's Artful in Aardvark, with a few Wayland wails
    Ubuntu has done a good job of integrating a few plugins that improve GNOME's user experience compared to stock GNOME – most notably a modified version of the Dash-to-Dock and the App Indicator extensions, which go a long way toward making GNOME a bit more like Unity. It's worth noting that Ubuntu's fork of Dash-to-Dock lacks some features of the original, but you can uninstall the Ubuntu version in favour of the original if you prefer. In fact you can really revert to a pretty stock GNOME desktop with just a few tweaks. Canonical said it wasn't going to heavily modify GNOME and indeed it hasn't.
  • What’s New in Ubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark
  • Ubuntu Podcast: S10E33 – Aggressive Judicious Frame
    This week we’ve been protecting our privacy with LineageOS and playing Rust. Telegram get fined, your cloud is being used to mine BitCoin, Google announces a new privacy focused product tier, North Korea hacks a UK TV studio, a new fully branded attack vector is unveiled and Purism reach their funding goal for the Librem 5.
  • Refreshing the Xubuntu logo
    Earlier this year I worked a bit with our logo to propose a small change to it – first change to the logo in 5 years. The team approved, but for various reasons the new logo did not make it to 17.10. Now we’re ready to push it out to the world.