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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Will New Android/Windows PCs Find Success? Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:05pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:03pm
Story Kali Linux 1.0.6 released. Cryptsetup has “nuclear option” integrated Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:00pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:00pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:55pm
Story Linux 3.14 May Bring Big VMware GPU Driver Update Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:52pm
Story Android 4.4 KitKat starts to hit Galaxy Note 3 Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:45pm
Story SteamOS updated with AMD support Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:42pm
Story Linux Drives Automotive Innovation into the New Year Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 6:37pm
Story Epic OpenShot 2.0 Update!(Part 2 of 3) Rianne Schestowitz 13/01/2014 - 7:09am

Unix or Linux commands for changing user rights

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I received the question via email — “…How do I change user rights under UNIX? I am using Red Hat Enterprise Linux and my background includes Windows network…”

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Ubuntu Linux On Thinkpad T43p: Wow!

Filed under
Ubuntu

After reading report after report of people using Ubuntu Linux on various flavors of desktop and laptop computers, I've finally decided to give it a try.

Emacs tips: Customize your Emacs experience

Filed under
HowTos

One of the principal advantages of Emacs over competing editors is how flexible and customizable it is. In fact, in several other "Emacs tips" columns, you may find references to customizing your setup. It's a big topic, so this is a quick start guide to the fundamentals: the .emacs file and basic customization techniques.

rPath Named as Finalist for LinuxWorld San Francisco 2006 Product Excellence Awards

Filed under
Linux

rPath’s solutions named as finalists in three categories – Best Open Source Solution, Best Utility Grid Computing Solution and Best Virtualization Solution

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KateOS 3.0 Released & Tested

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

KateOS 3.0 was released early this morning and happily Tuxmachines was granted a preview. This release brings lots of new changes as well as a great looking new theme. Performance and stability remain, as always, well above par. KateOS has always been one of our favorite distributions, and this release doesn't change that either. What is new this release?

The cosmonaut's crusade for free computers

Filed under
Ubuntu

What would you do if you'd made £400m in the last tech boom? Relax and take it easy?

Well, for Mark Shuttleworth, the choice was easy, writes Ben King.

Google: the Godfather of Open Source?

Filed under
Google

It's well known that Google runs its vast array of servers using a custom version of GNU/Linux. But this is only one aspect of its support for free software. Others include its Summer of Code, now well established as an incubator of both coding talent and projects, and more recently its open source code repository, which offers a useful alternative to Sourceforge.net. Similarly, in porting Picasa to GNU/Linux, Google has made contributions to Wine, while open source projects in Sri Lanka have been the beneficiaries of more direct help, to the tune of $25,000.

But Google is also operating behind the scenes to bolster free software in other ways.

The ODF debate: A real world view

Filed under
OSS

What exactly is meant by document portability? Does it mean that a document created in one application can be viewed using a different application on another operating system? Does it mean that the document can be viewed and edited within another application on the same or another OS platform? Or does it simply mean that you can be sure that the document you create today can be read in the future using proprietary products from the same software vendor?

GP2X: It's all fun and games

Filed under
Gaming

The GP2X is an open, Linux-based handheld games console manufactured by Game Park Holdings of South Korea. It has a typical handheld control layout, a good quality backlit screen, built-in stereo speakers, headphone socket, and several connectivity and expansion options. My son is completely taken with the device, and it has won me over too. At £125 (or $190), you're not going to find a less expensive handheld device that can be expanded into a full-blown computer.

SPI board drops Perens

Filed under
OSS

Open source developer and evangelist Bruce Perens says he is not overly concerned about being voted off the board of Software in the Public Interest, the non-profit open source organization he founded a decade ago.

User interfaces should teach, not hide

Filed under
Software

Today, I finally decided that my gVim editor needed a smaller font, and the process of getting it to work right has made me notice a fundamental flaw in the way we think about user interfaces. Essentially it’s just this: GUIs should teach, not obfuscate or hide the underlying mechanism.

Discovering Linux - The Experiences of a Linux Newbie

Filed under
Reviews

The concept of open-source, free software is very appealing. Many of the Linux-distros are very good, but I still haven't found one that fits my needs perfectly. Also, my needs will propably change as I become more aquainted to Linux. At this time, my favourite distro is propably Mandriva One, though it would've been Ubuntu if they had had support for restricted formats.

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior Available for download

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior is our next step up from MiniMe. As you know MiniMe comes with just a basic desktop allowing full user customization. Junior comes with a set of pre-selected programs for Web Browsing, Email, Instant Messaging, Blogging, IRC chat, Music, Graphics, Video (additional software required for encrypted DVD playback and proprietary formats), Digital Camera, Games, Ftp, Bit torrent transfer, CD/DVD burning and more.

Community: The "Linux Community"? Not From What I See

Filed under
Linux

Learning about, installing and applying desktop Linux may have saved my business. After a more than disappointing year, I was faced with some tough choices. Running a real estate business is tough, extremely tough in Austin and unbelievably tough if you are an independant.

Phil Thompson Talks About PyQt

Filed under
Interviews

High level languages are increasingly being used in preference to C and C++ in new desktop software. One of these languages best supported in KDE and Qt is Python. To find out about the history and current state of PyQt KDE Dot News talked to Phil Thompson, author and maintainer of the bindings.

Confessions From Studio Dave

Filed under
Hardware

I hate hardware. Sometimes I hate Linux too, but more often I just hate the hardware. Boxes, wires, connectors, keyboards, mice, the works. Some days I just want all of it to disappear. Hmm, did I perhaps have a bad time building my new machine ? That's putting it lightly.

Manage your time with Remind

Filed under
HowTos

One thing most people are bad at is remembering things -- anniversaries, deadlines, schedules. Computers, on the other hand, are very good at tracking things -- so long as you have a way to tell them to do so. Remind, a GPLed calendar and alarm application from Roaring Penguin, is a good way to keep track of your appointments and commitments on your computer so you don't need to worry about keeping them in your head.

Serving large files (>2 GB) with Apache

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever encountered a situation where a file larger than 2 GB (say, a DVD image) doesn't show up in a directory index served by Apache, whereas smaller files from the same directory are shown and served?

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More in Tux Machines

Best Tools to Access Remote Linux Desktop

Nowadays, you can’t carry your system or laptop everywhere. So to make the things more manageable, there is a service of remote access that gives you full access to your system from anywhere. It is made possible by the Microsoft that developed a remote desktop protocol (RDP), which offers a graphical interface to connect to a remote system over a network connection. Read more

Ubuntu: Server Installer, IoT Security, Snaps, Xubuntu

  • The improved 18.04.1 LTS Server Installer - Call for testing!
    With the release of 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver the new server installer was introduced. At the time, it still lacked certain critical features which have now been implemented.
  • Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS Introducing Revised Server Installer, Adds Missing Features
    With the April release of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on the server front was a brand new, in-house developed server installer created by Canonical to differentiate it from Debian's long-used text installer for the Ubuntu Server images. While it offered a fresh look and some new features, it shipped without many features common to Linux server installers. Fortunately, that is changing with the upcoming Ubuntu Server 18.04.1 release. As expected, Canonical is filling in the gaps with their new server installer dubbed Subiquity. With the upcoming Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS release they will be shipping a new version of this installer. This updated installer now supports LVM, RAID, VLAN, and bonds -- important features missing originally from Ubuntu Server 18.04.0. The functionality is now in place with the latest daily images although the text-based user-interface is still being refined.
  • IoT Security at Scale: Managing end-to-end security
  • Perfectly Formed Snaps Challenge
    Snaps are perfect for the smaller things in life too. Looking away from the graphical flagship apps, the snap store hosts lightweight server daemons, command line utilities, developer tools and even tiny games. Recently, a couple of petite snaps were published in the store. Sparky is a simple game played in a terminal, and a modest 32KB on disk. Bash-Shell-RPG is similarly diminutive at only 8KB. Neither contain an excess of additional libraries, just the absolute minimum needed to function everywhere.
  • What’s New in Xubuntu 18.04 LTS
    Xubuntu 18.04 LTS is the latest release of Xubuntu, it now available to download and install on your laptop and PC. This release features latest version of Xfce 4.12 as default desktop, include latest Xfce components. Xubuntu 18.04 LTS also comes with an updated Greybird GTK+ theme that includes a new dark style, better HiDPI support, greater consistency between GTK+ 2 and GTK+ 3 apps, GTK+ 3 styles for Google Chrome and Chromium web browsers, smaller switches, and improved scales. However, the GTK Theme Configuration tool was removed and it’s no longer possible to override colors in themes.

Software: Latte Dock, Emacs, Ick, REAPER

  • Latte Dock 0.8 Released with Widget Separators, Setup Sharing, More
    A new version of Latte Dock, an icon-based task bar for the KDE desktop, is available to download. Latte Dock 0.8 is the first stable release of the app switching software in almost a year and is the third stable release overall.
  • 3 Emacs modes for taking notes
    No matter what line of work you're in, it's inevitable you have to take a few notes. Often, more than a few. If you're like many people in this day and age, you take your notes digitally. Open source enthusiasts have a variety of options for jotting down their ideas, thoughts, and research in electronic format. You might use a web-based tool. You might go for a desktop application. Or, you might turn to the command line. If you use Emacs, that wonderful operating system disguised as a text editor, there are modes that can help you take notes more efficiently. Let's look at three of them.
  • Ick version 0.53 released: CI engine
    I have just made a new release of ick, my CI system. The new version number is 0.53, and a summary of the changes is below. The source code is pushed to my git server (git.liw.fi), and Debian packages to my APT repository (code.liw.fi/debian). See https://ick.liw.fi/download/ for instructions.
  • REAPER 5.93 Brings New Linux-Native Builds
    Since 2016 we have been looking forward to the REAPER digital audio workstation software for Linux while with this week's v5.93 release, the experimental Linux-native builds are now officially available.
  • Digital Audio Workstation REAPER Adds Experimental Native Linux Builds
    REAPER, a popular music production tool, added experimental native Linux builds to its download page with the latest 5.93 release. Initially released in 2005, REAPER (Rapid Environment for Audio Production, Engineering, and Recording) is a powerful digital audio workstation (DAW) and MIDI sequencer, available for Windows, macOS and Linux. Cockos, the company that develops REAPER, was founded by Justin Frankel of Winamp and Gnutella peer-to-peer network fame. The application uses a proprietary license and you can evaluate it for free for 60 days without having to provide any personal details or register. After the free trial ends, you can continue to use it but a nag screen will show up for a few seconds when the application starts. A license costs $225 for commercial use, or $60 for a discounted license (details here).

today's howtos