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Thursday, 18 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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October 2005 of TUX, Issue 07

Filed under
OSS

The October issue of TUX is now available for download. In this issue:

*Who Let the GNOME Dogs Out?
*Inkscape: the Elements of Design
*GnuCash
*Playing Windows Games on Linux with Cedega
*much more

Microsoft 'must support OpenDocument'

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft will be forced to adopt the open file format or risk 'sliding into irrelevance', according to industry observers.

Mandriva Linux 2006 has been released

Filed under
MDV

Right on the heels of the SuSE Linux 10.0 announcement comes Mandriva Linux 2006. Of course it's only available for club members at this time.

Linux pioneer wins lifetime achievement award

Filed under
Linux

Alan Cox's efforts maintaining the Linux kernel have been recognised at the LinuxWorld awards.

Making an OpenOffice.org 2.0 presentation

Filed under
HowTos

In this tip, follow OpenOffice.org instructor and author Solveig Haugland as she describes the step-by-step process for creating a presentation in the new 2.0 release of OpenOffice.

Check Point to Acquire Makers of Snort

Filed under
Software

Check Point Software Technologies Ltd. and Sourcefire, Inc., developers of Snort, today announced that they have signed an agreement for Check Point to acquire Sourcefire. What does this mean for Snort?

It's Official - SuSE Linux 10.0 is Released!

Filed under
SUSE

Oct 6th: SUSE Linux 10.0 OSS GM has been released. The OpenSuSE site is slowing down already under a slashdot effect as the masses flock to get directions to download mirrors.

Gentoo User's Response to Slacker who tried Gentoo

This is a gentoo user's answer to Mr. Slacker Tries His Hand at Gentoo. If you missed the story on OSNews on the Slacker Tries His Hand at Gentoo, you really must read it. It's a hilarios account of an experienced linux user's first try at gettting a Gentoo system all set up for work or play. At first I was gonna make a cute witty comment to the story and be on my way, but instead it turned into an article. I guess as I read his story I found I had something to say at about every experience he shared.

a penguinista's review of Serenity

Filed under
Movies
Reviews

Penguinistas tend to love Star Trek and Star Wars. Maybe it's the love of the idea of endless possibilities that runs as a common theme through both free open source software and those movies. I'm not here to do a traditional movie review, instead I'm going to try to figure out why penguinstas and GNUsters are going to see this film in droves, and if the film is really worth the hype.

Ad-free Opera browser up to 3 million downloads -- and counting

Filed under
Software

Opera's browser seems to be music to the ears of Internet surfers. After the Oslo-based company served up about 1 million browser downloads in the first two days following its launch of the ad- and license-free Opera v8.5, some 3 million additional copies were downloaded in next two weeks.

Howto: Mail Server with Virtual Users And Domains

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a mail server based on Postfix that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database with Courier on Debian Sarge 3.1.

Monitoring network traffic with Ruby and Pcap

Filed under
HowTos

There are many situations where the ability to monitor network traffic can save a lot of time and effort. If you want to reverse engineer a network protocol, keep an eye on junior's browsing habits, or blackmail your evil boss, Ruby and libpcap can make it easy!

How Dell repels attempts to buy its 'open source' PC

Filed under
Hardware

Dell this week received much praise for releasing a new version of its "open source" PC. While Dell garners glowing reviews for shipping such an open source OS-friendly product, the company's new E510n actually stands as yet another example of how hard Dell tries not to sell non-Microsoft gear.

Japanese state aims to boost state use of Linux software

Filed under
Linux

he government here aims to switch some of its computers to the free Linux operating system and reduce its dependence on Microsoft Corp's Windows, officials indicated.

SuSE Goes Gold?

Filed under
SUSE

Yet to be officially announced, SuSE Linux 10.0 iso torrents, cd isos and delta isos are making their way to ftp mirrors around the world.

Socialtext to open-source bulk of its software

Filed under
OSS

Socialtext Inc. plans to open-source more than 80% of its software, the company announced Wednesday. The U.S. start-up specializes in software and support for enterprises looking to set up their own internal wikis and Web logs.

Microsoft: No Office software for Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp. is not going to release a version of its Office suite software for open-source rival Linux, although the company is actively studying how Linux works and how it can integrate with the platform, a Microsoft representative said Wednesday.

Linux on desktop is a diverse market - really

Filed under
Linux

Don't expect hegemony from a single Linux vendor on the desktop comparable with Microsoft's Office, as rival frameworks and implementations tackle different markets.

Downloading Source Trees 101

Filed under
HowTos

If you’ve been using open source for a good length of time, you’ve probably needed a feature or bug fix that’s only available in the development tree of a open source project. Here, let's see how to use CVS and SVN to access the development tree of a few notable projects.

Linux and the Desktop: Will it Jump the Hump?

Filed under
Linux

"Novell sees a lot of excitement and interest from companies that are looking at segments of their populations where these specialized desktops are in play," said Greg Mancusi-Ungaro, Novell's director of marketing for Linux and open-source products. "Linux is seeing a lot of action there."

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

More on Librem 5 Phone Update

  • Purism Post First Librem 5 Phone Update
    Purism has delivered its first progress report on development of the Librem 5 Phone, which it successfully crowdfunded last year.
  • Purism Says Its Privacy-Focused Linux Phone Will Use Wayland and i.MX8 ARM CPU
    Two and a half months after it successfully crowdfunded its Librem 5 privacy-focused, end-to-end encrypted Linux smartphone, Purism released today the first update on the development progress. Librem 5's crowdfunding campaign ended with more than $2 million funds raised from thousands of backers. Then, Purism promised to put all that money to good use in the manufacturing process of the Linux-powered smartphone, which should have started as soon as they find a company willing to build it.

Fedora: Updated F27 Live ISOs, Synergy 2.0, Bodhi 3.2.0, Announcing Flapjack

  • F27-20180112 Updated Live Isos Released
    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.13-300 kernel.
  • synergy-2.0.0 is in Fedora updates-testing
    I have packed the latest stable version, 2.0.0, for Fedora 27, 26 and EPEL 7. No EPEL 6 update this time as it requires CXX14, which EL6 does not provide.
  • Bodhi 3.2.0 released
  • Announcing Flapjack
    Here’s a post about a tool that I’ve developed at work. You might find it useful if you contribute to any desktop platform libraries that are packaged as a Flatpak runtime, such as GNOME or KDE. Flatpak is a system for delivering desktop applications that was pioneered by the GNOME community. At Endless, we have jumped aboard the Flatpak train. Our product Endless OS is a Linux distribution, but not a traditional one in the sense of being a collection of packages that you install with a package manager; it’s an immmutable OS image, with atomic updates delivered through OSTree. Applications are sandboxed-only and Flatpak-only.
  • Flapjack Helps Developers Work On Components Inside Flatpak

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Latvia's e-health system hit by cyberattack from abroad
    Latvia said its new e-health system was on Tuesday hit by a large-scale cyberattack that saw thousands of requests for medical prescriptions pour in per second from more than 20 countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the European Union. No data was compromised, according to health officials, who immediately took down the site, which was launched earlier this month to streamline the writing of prescriptions in the Baltic state. "It is clear that it was a planned attack, a widespread attack—we might say a specialised one—as it emanated from computers located in various different countries, both inside the European Union and outside Europe," state secretary Aivars Lapins told reporters. "We received thousands of requests in a very short space of time. That's not the normal way the system works," he said, adding that an investigation is under way.
  • Linux Lite Developer Creates Automated Spectre/Meltdown Checker for Linux OSes
    The developer of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distribution has created a script that makes it easier for Linux users to check if their systems are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws. As we reported last week, developer Stéphane Lesimple created an excellent script that would check if your Linux distribution's kernel is patched against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that have been publicly disclosed earlier this month and put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Purism Releases Meltdown and Spectre Patches for Its Librem Linux Laptops
    Purism, the computer technology company behind the privacy-focused, Linux-based Librem laptops and the upcoming smartphone, released patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities. The company was one of the first Linux OEMs and OS vendor to announce that it's working on addressing both the Meltdown and Spectre security exploits on his Linux laptops. Meltdown and Spectre have been unearthed in early January and they are two severe hardware bugs that put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Facebook Awards Security Researchers $880,000 in 2017 Bug Bounties
    Facebook is hardly a small organization, with large teams of engineers and security professionals on staff. Yet even Facebook has found that it can profit from expertise outside of the company, which is why the social networking giant has continued to benefit from its bug bounty program. In 2017, Facebook paid out $880,000 to security researchers as part of its bug bounty program. The average reward payout in 2017 was $1,900, up from $1,675 in 2016.
  • Multicloud Deployments Create Security Challenges, F5 Report Finds