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Friday, 21 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Linux ... Maybe It's Time You Thought About It

Filed under
Linux

There is an alternative to MS Windows as an operating System for your computer, and it's not a Macintosh. In the last few years, Linux has blossomed into a full fledged Desktop system and is comparable to Windows in every respect except the installed user base.

Book Review: Fedora Linux

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Reviews

This book will get you up to speed quickly on Fedora Linux, a securely-designed Linux distribution that includes a massive selection of free software packages. Fedora is hardened out-of-the-box, it’s easy to install, and extensively customizable - and this book shows you how to make Fedora work for you.

Euro firms cool on Vista and Linux

Filed under
OS

European businesses are only considering migrating to Linux when they decide to deploy new applications, but most currently have no intention of moving to Windows Vista either, according to a survey released this week.

Microsoft admits open source patent pledge misses the target

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft Corp has admitted execution flaws with its promise not to sue open source software developers and invited the wider community to tell the software firm how it can get it right.

Has Microsoft conceded the desktop OS market to Linux?

Filed under
OS

Microsoft has long dominated the home desktop Operating System market while Unix and Unix-like systems have dominated the server and datacenter world. Have Microsoft's continuous product delays, removal of highly touted new features, addition of more intrusive DRM and the introduction of a highly restrictive EULA sealed Microsoft's fate?

For Funambol, open source software makes business sense

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Software

Funambol, an open source Java-based SyncML application, reached a milestone in September with the release of v3.0. The software provides calendar and address book linkage for groupware and mobile devices. Funambol started out more than three years ago as Sync4j, with a project on SourceForge.net. From humble beginnings, Funambol has today become a company that sells commercial support contracts, but still makes its software available under the GPL.

Icedove Mail Client For Debian Etch

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HowTos

free/unbranded thunderbird mail client.Icedove is a unbranded Thunderbird mail client suitable for free distribution. The goal of Thunderbird is to produce a cross platform stand alone mail application using the XUL user interface language. Icedove/Thunderbird leaves a somewhat smaller memory footprint than the Mozilla/Seamonkey suite.

More on the Novell-Microsoft agrement: Interview with Justin Steinman (Novell)

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Interviews
SUSE

The Internet was buzzing these days about the recent Novell-Microsoft agreement. Under an unprecedented deal, Microsoft has agreed to offer sales support for SUSE Linux and start working on interoperability. Let's see what Novell has to say about this agreement as Justin Steinman, Director of Marketing for Linux & Open Platform Solutions for Novell, answers some questions on LinuxInterviews.com.

Also: Novell Sends a Letter to Judge Kimball

Thunderbird beyond the Basics

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HowTos

Thunderbird is so straightforward in use that most users never touch its more-advanced features. But, even if you don't consider yourself a Thunderbird power user, you might want to take a closer look at the tools it has to offer. Chances are you can dramatically improve your e-mailing habits.

Ubuntu's Missing Link

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Ubuntu

Ubuntu has a program installation problem. To be fair, nearly all Linux distributions have the same issue, but I'll pick on Ubuntu because its popular and is the choice for many users switching from Windows. The problem I am referring to is the missing menu link after many graphical apps are installed.

Linux takes the supercomputer hill

Filed under
Linux

Linux powers more than 75 percent of the world's most powerful computers, according to data released yesterday in the annual "Top 500" report. Intel's Pentium 4 Xeon proved the most popular processor, followed by dual-core Opteron and EM64T (Itanium) Xeons in a dead heat for second. A PowerPC-based machine once again took top honors, however.

Tips and Tricks for the Linux Admin: Roll Your Own

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HowTos

This month's tasty installment explores the world of Roll-Your-Own Linuxes. Why would you want to assemble your own customized Linux image? Well, why not? For one thing, it's just plain fun.

NFSv4: A Unix Mainstay Learns New Tricks

NFS has traditionally been a semi-robust method of sharing files between Unix-based computers. The IETF has been working on NFSv4 since early 2000, and implementations have finally started springing up everywhere. The Linux kernel team has focused its efforts in NFSv4, providing its least buggy NFS implementation yet. If that alone isn't reason enough to start using v4, read on.

Rant for PC-BSD 1.2

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Reviews
BSD

PC-BSD has intrigued me in the past. In the past I have been very impressed at how well it worked, and more impressed by how it doesn't sacrifice the power of FreeBSD in order to do it. Let's see how this version pans out.

My operating system is my religion

Filed under
Misc

I am truly amazed at some of the fanatical responses to any indication that a particular operating system is below par. It seems that when someone is confronted with a statement like your operating system is no good because..... the rest just doesn't get heard.

Telepathy and kopete

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Software

The development of KDE 4 keeps going these days. One milestone achieved these days was a working telepathy plugin in kopete. Michaël Larouche showed that it can already be used for text conversation.

Mozilla Claims Early Win in Browser Phishfight

Filed under
Moz/FF

A new study sanctioned by Mozilla declares Firefox 2 as a big winner over Microsoft's IE 7 in the battle to block ID theft scam sites, but weaknesses in both browsers confirm that the battle against phishing has only just begun.

What really happened to Ubuntu's Edgy artwork

Filed under
Ubuntu

Casual Ubuntu users may have registered surprise when they first booted the distribution's Edgy Eft release this past October. Back at the beginning of the Edgy development cycle, much was made of the formation of a new, dedicated Art Team to develop a fresh look for the backgrounds and splash screens of the startup process. But when Edgy hit the shelves, the artwork was scarcely different from that of its predecessor, Dapper Drake.

Red Hat Stock Climbing Back

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat shares have come scratching back from their worst levels following the twin announcements that Oracle plans to offer maintenance service to Red Hat Linux users while Microsoft has teamed up with Novell to offer ways for companies to run both Windows and Novell’s Suse Linux on the same boxes.

Finity Flight II Episode III: Beast's Will Released

Filed under
Gaming

Finity Flight II is a multiplatform high flying adventure tale in the form of a top-down shooter. In each weekly episode you will find new challenges to hone your skills on and a new portion of the on-going story:

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.