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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Debian Delay: Is Sarge MIA?

Filed under
Linux

"The latest release of Debian Linux, code named "Sarge" was supposed to report for duty at the end of last year. That didn't happen. Why has Sarge been delayed and ultimately does it matter? Debian developers and Debian's founding father talked to LinuxPlanet about Sarge's delay and its ultimate deployment."

New License for Snort Rules Announced

Filed under
Software

"Yesterday Snort developer Marty Roesch announced that the license governing Snort rule usage will be changing. Marty said, 'Recently, we have become increasing aware of companies who are commercially redistributing rules written by the Sourcefire VRT without contributing to the considerable resources required to develop high quality rules in such a timely fashion.'"

Hacker taps into business school files"

Filed under
Security

"A computer hacker gained access to internal admissions records at Harvard, Stanford and other top business schools, then helped applicants log on and learn their fate weeks ahead of schedule, officials said Thursday."

Gentoo Linux 2005.0 Security Rebuild

Filed under
Gentoo

Due to a set of remotely exploitable bugs in Gaim and Mozilla-Firefox and locally exploitable bugs in QT and Kdelibs found in the last few hours before a final 2005.0 release was completed, it was decided by all of the members of Release Engineering to rebuild the release media to resolve these bugs, prior to release.

amoroK LiveCD

Filed under
Linux

"there's a party in the CD"

"amaroK Live is a stripped down LiveCD (based on PCLinuxOS) with a fully functional amaroK music player bundled with the tracks commissioned last year by Wired Magazine, which are distributed under the Creative Commons Sampling Licenses. It includes - among other major artists - tracks by the Beastie Boys and David Byrne."

ChoicePoint was victim of ID theft in '02

Filed under
Security

Despite recent denials, it has been revealed that ChoicePoint was indeed victim to identity thieves earlier than had been previously reported.

Intel PR Department Hard at Work

Filed under
Hardware

Seems the news is chocked full of Intel everyday. Today they seem to be planning on upping production/shipping of their embedded memory products used in cell phones and pda. "Intel said it is also adopting a new computer memory technology, called Fully-Buffered Dual In-Line Memory Module (FB-DIMM) for its first multi-core server platform for Xeon chips, code-named Bensley."

CA confirms plans for open source patent pledge

Filed under
OSS

"Systems management vendor Computer Associates International has confirmed that it intends to pledge a number of its patents to the open source community to remove any perceived threat against the Linux operating system."

Court Overturns Eolas Browser Judgment Against Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Legal

"The U.S District Court of Appeals on Wednesday called for a new trial on a key aspect of the $520 million jury verdict that found that Microsoft had infringed on Web browser technology patents held by Eolas Technologies."

AMD's Latest Stunt

Filed under
Hardware

"CHIP FIRM AMD often attempts to pull off a stunt at the time of the Intel Developer Forum. And this time it took to the sky in a bid to remind Intel that it has a dual core Turion 64 notebook processor on the way."

KDE's FOSDEM report

Filed under
Software
OSS

Jonathan Riddell has posted news and pictures of Europe's biggest meeting of Free Software developers last weekend. He briefs us on the discussions and drops some big names. It sounds like it was great. Wish I could have been there. Big Grin

HP's ex-CEO Fiorina may end up at World Bank

Filed under
Misc

"Ousted Hewlett-Packard chief executive Carly Fiorina is under consideration to be World Bank president, a Bush administration official said, adding that no decision has been made."

Illicit drug sales booming online

Filed under
Web

"The worldwide trade in illegal drugs sold over the internet has surged, according to the UN's drug watchdog. Dangerous drugs are being sold without prescription in a virtual marketplace that is difficult to control, says the International Narcotics Control Board."

Half-Life 2 sweeps Bafta awards

Filed under
Gaming

"PC first person shooter Half-Life 2 has won six Bafta Awards, including best game and best online game."

"The title, developed by Valve, was released last year to universal acclaim - receiving special praise for its immersive plot and physics engine."

Invisibility Shields Planned

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"In popular science fiction, the power of invisibility is readily apparent. Star Trek fans, for example, know that the devious Romulans could make their spaceships suddenly disappear. But is the idea really so implausible? Not according to new findings by scientists who say they have come up with a way to create cloaking device."

Showing the Newbie's Side in Linux

Filed under
Linux

When I first started reading the article "Current Problems with Linux" I expected something of a Linux bashing. However as I read thru it, I kinda remembering feeling the way he describes five years ago when I first started using Linux. It took me about 3 or 4 tries to finally get away from windows due to some of the issues Aditya Nag discusses. I don't entirely agree with all his assessments, but some merit further thought.

Media Player Flaw Speaks Volumes on M$ Security

Filed under
Microsoft
Security

I'm sure everyone's read of M$ latest security blunder relating to it's media player, but I particularly like David Coursey's stance. He says, "By focusing not on the largest number of potential victims but on patching its most current software, Microsoft reveals its tendency to "encourage" customers to buy new software by letting them sway in the breeze for a while."

Displays on Your Car's Windshield?

Filed under
Sci/Tech

"Ever wish you could be Michael J. Fox in Back to the Future II and travel to a future where city windows display pastoral scenes and the newspaper is a disposable piece of constantly updating, foldable plastic? Well, that movie magic may soon come to life, thanks to a new class of materials recently developed by researchers at Oregon State University and Hewlett Packard."

Hollywood Studios File New Round of Web Lawsuits

Filed under
Movies
Legal

"Hollywood's major movie studios filed a new round of lawsuits across the United States on Thursday against people who trade illegally copied films and TV shows on the Internet."

Concerns About Open Source "Zealots"

Filed under
OSS

"Speaking live on SYS-CON.TV, Linux Business Week editor-in-chief Maureen O'Gara talked with SYS-CON Media West Coast bureau chief Roger Strukhoff about a variety of issues, including zealotry and what she interprets as the "anti-capitalist" overtones of the open source movement."

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more