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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Let’s see some ID, please

As the joke goes, on the Internet nobody knows you’re a dog. But although anonymity has been part of Internet culture since the first browser, it’s also a major obstacle to making the Web a safe place to conduct business:

No More Linux on the WRT54G?

Filed under
Linux

There has been a lot of confusion lately as to what's going on with the end of Linux support on the WRT54G and WRT54GS line of routers. Hopefully I'll be able to describe what's going on, what's changing, what's coming, and what you can do about it.

Linus on source code, developer craziness, and the makings of successful projects

Filed under
Linux

This is a more in-depth look at the fascinating interchange between Linus Torvalds and Chris Blizzard on the Desktop Linux (public) mailing list concerning user-interfaces.

Should Apple switch Mac OS X from Mach to Linux kernel?

Filed under
Mac

In many ways, OS X is what Linux would be with a great GUI. Likewise, Linux is in some ways what OS X could be. For all its strengths, OS X does allow tasks to so dominate the OS that everything else stops while the beach ball spins.

What Would You Do With A Supercomputer?

Filed under
Hardware

Searching for a massively powerful digital system to help researchers grapple with complex tasks like forecasting weather and simulating particle interactions? Look to an enormous, well-funded organization. Or on a desktop.

A year in the life of open source in South Africa

Filed under
OSS

It's been a long, bad year for politicians, petrol prices and proprietary software. But 2005 was an exceptional year for open source software. It really found its feet this year, and I think it also started to cement a new façade that will serve it well for years to come.

Rendering HTML In Your Head? Bad Idea!

Filed under
Humor

If you thought the security holes in Internet Explorer were large enough to push a G-class star through, then you haven't seen anything yet.

China's Red Flag Sees Desktop as Linux Battlefield

Filed under
Linux

The vice president of the dominant Linux supplier in China says government support is creating opportunities for desktop Linux to grow. Zheng shared some of his views on Linux, open source and China's IT future in a rare, candid interview with eWEEK senior editor Darryl K. Taft last week in Beijing.

Torvalds wades into desktop debate

Filed under
Linux

Linux creator Linus Torvalds has stepped into a desktop war, expressing a preference for the K Desktop Environment over GNOME, and accusing the developers of the latter project of being "interface nazis".

Quanta Announces $100 Laptops

Filed under
OLPC

The One Laptop per Child (OLPC) board of directors today announced that Quanta Computer Inc. of Taiwan was chosen as the original design manufacturer (ODM) for the $100 laptop project.

The decision was made after the board reviewed bids from several possible manufacturing companies.

Korea finds Another Reason to Switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Some observers contend that all the kinks are triggered by Korea’s heavy reliance on the proprietary Windows software. Instead, they argue the country should promote the use of open-source programs like Linux.

The penguin's not really coming

Filed under
Linux

The use of Linux and other open source software in Australia and New Zealand is miles behind North America, according to tech research company Forrester.

Linux Quick Fix Notebook

Filed under
Reviews

So we have to admit that we didn't have high hopes for Linux Quick Fix Notebook; the title is uninspiring and makes it sound like another book promising expertise without effort. But this is far from the truth and, contrary to what we expected, this is a book that can easily be recommended.

A Concise apt-get / dpkg primer for new Debian users

Filed under
HowTos

When many other linux distributions were bogged down in dependency hell, Debian users were shielded from these problems owing to Debian's superior package handling capablities using apt-get.

Here I will explain how to go about using this package handling utility to get the results that you desire.

More on Linus, KDE, and GNOME

Filed under
Linux

It all started, like most family fights, with a little incident that was blown out of proportion.

How Much RAM Do You Really Need?

Filed under
Hardware

How much RAM does your PC have? If you run Windows XP, it is probably in the range of 512 MB to 1 GB. Older Windows versions will do the job with less than that, but as soon as you execute demanding applications or more than one application at a time, anything below 512 MB will likely translate into performance bottlenecks.

Opportunity and discrimination

Filed under
OSS

The government is planning to outlaw age discrimination in employment. Should I expect a rush of recruiters seeking my services as a result? Somehow I doubt it but there are some interesting opportunities around. Open source is one of the most interesting.

Swiss government switches 3,000 systems to Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Novell Inc. Tuesday announced an agreement with the government of Switzerland to replace the software in 3,000 of its servers with the company's SUSE Linux operating system.

Installation Face Off: Linux or Windows

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Lately, I have been hearing that Ubuntu is an easy Linux distribution to install and it is easier to install than Windows XP. I have even heard remarks that "My grandmother could install Ubuntu." With that being said, I did virtual installs of both Ubuntu Linux and Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 to see which one I felt was easier.

KDE Quality Assurance Meeting Report

Filed under
KDE

On the weekend of December 10th & 11th, a small group of nine KDE contributors met in Hamburg to work on quality assurance checks for KDE's code base.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.