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Tuesday, 23 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story All-in-One Internet Application Suite SeaMonkey 2.26 Is Based on Firefox 29 Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 8:15pm
Story Android KitKat Sees its Market Share Surge Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 8:10pm
Story Hewlett-Packard's Radical New Laptop Doesn't Run Microsoft's Windows Roy Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 8:06pm
Story Manjaro 0.8.9 Gets Its Fourth Update Pack with Fix for the Heartbleed Bug Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 7:45pm
Story Open-Source ATI Rage 128 Driver Gets Revived Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 7:36pm
Story 40% Italian public administrations uses open source Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 7:30pm
Story Mozilla Issues Proposal for Protecting Net Neutrality Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 7:18pm
Story No, Android doesn’t stink Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 7:15pm
Story gEdit shows that GNOME wants to drive users away Rianne Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 7:07pm
Story CyanogenMod 11.0 M6 Release Roy Schestowitz 05/05/2014 - 5:59pm

PCLinuxOS - perfect halfway house

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

It's been quite the dilemma over recent months as to which Linux distro is the best choice for users moving away from XP (or "windoze" as it's affectionately labelled by some in the community). Instinctively the majority of users looked to Ubuntu and the user-friendliness of the gnome environment but it was brought to my attention that there's another major player in this exchange, a plucky little distro called PCLinuxOS, and here are my thoughts on it.

Mandriva Free 2007 - the FOSSwire review

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MDV
Reviews

I’m going to take a look at the popular Linux distribution Mandriva; more specifically, their latest free-of-charge desktop outing Mandriva Free 2007.

Using Unbuntu Christian Edition - a Review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The last time I saw this distribution discussed it degenerated quickly into a flame war that had nothing to do with the merits of the distribution. Recently I saw that there was an update to the distribution. I had a bit of time so I thought I would take it for a spin and see what it was actually like. While this review is brief I hope to cover the major features that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu its parent distribution and rate its overall usefulness.

Means and ends in open source

Filed under
OSS

One thing that makes analysis of business strategies in open source difficult (even for professionals) is a confusion of means and ends.

Get Crontab Output in Ubuntu via E-mail

Filed under
HowTos

Having troubles getting your crontab’s output in Ubuntu? Constantly checking your email for a non-existent email? Turns out you might just be missing a message.

Windows vs GNU/Linux vs MacOSX - the showdown

Filed under
OS

I’ve been a Windows user since Windows 3.1, a Desktop GNU/Linux user since August and a MacOSX user for some weeks. I will share with you what I was able to learn from my experience with these operative systems.

Kill Process with Care

Filed under
HowTos

A lots of people likes to do kill -9, which means kill a process by force. By specified -9, process will be terminated by force, which is very fast and confirm kill but it leaves hidden side effects. Refers to Useless use of kill -9, kill a process by specified -9 may leave child processes of a parent orphaned, temporary files open, shared memory segments active, and sockets busy. This leaves the system in a messy state, and could lead to unanticipated and hard to debug problems.

Ubuntu to add proprietary drivers

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Ubuntu

Analysis -- Reluctantly, the Ubuntu developer community has decided that with the next version of Ubuntu, Feisty Fawn, it will be including some proprietary drivers. Feisty Fawn's emphasis on "multimedia enablement" appears to be the culprit.

Also: Linux desktop domination "just a matter of time"

The 451 Group: Calculating Open Source Software Costs and Savings

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OSS

Raven Zachary, open source senior analyst and practice lead at The 451, expects costs savings to continue driving commercial open source adoption for a long time. He described the 'calculator' included in his lataest report as a practical and vendor-neutral tool.

Microsoft the enemy to Red Hat and Linux community

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Microsoft

Microsoft's deal with Novell has been followed by Ballmer seemingly extending the olive branch to Linux leader Red Hat. However, Red Hat, like others in the Linux community, see Microsoft's moves as containing a veiled threat and just a means to get revenue for nothing.

Open Source - it isn't just about being nice

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OSS

Michael Tiemann objects to the distinction between "open" and "free" software we suggested in the article entitled 'Take your covenant and shove it', Samba tells Novell. Here's Michael's reply in full:

LinuxToday: IBM--Orca or Penguin?

Filed under
Linux

Along this same vein, doesn't anyone else find it interesting that it's Sun jumping up and defending Free Software rather than IBM, which I believe has a much bigger stake in Linux? Where is IBM, anyway? I have three theories.

OpenOffice.org Calc adds support for Excel VBA

Filed under
OOo

As an Excel user, you may have looked at OpenOffice.org and found that it doesn't support Visual Basic for Applications (VBA), the Microsoft Office macro language. If you've spent years building hundreds of Excel macros, the fear of losing them all could keep you locked in to Office.

Red Hat Plans to List Shares on the New York Stock Exchange

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat, Inc. today announced that it has filed an application to list its common stock on the New York Stock Exchange. Upon approval of its application, the Company anticipates that its shares of common stock will begin trading on the NYSE on December 12, 2006, under the symbol "RHT". Until that time Red Hat will continue to trade on the NASDAQ Stock Market under the symbol "RHAT".

Also: Feeling New Heat, Red Hat Rolls on

Interview: Microsoft’s open-source peacemaker

Filed under
Microsoft
Interviews

Bridging the disparate worlds of Microsoft and the open-source community might seem an impossible task but Bill Hilf seems to be having some success in spanning the divide. He is trying to convince open-source developers that they can work with and not just against the software giant.

Criticism mounts over Birmingham's Linux project

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Linux

As reported earlier this week, Birmingham City Council pulled the plug on its £535,000 open-source pilot after its analysis concluded that it was cheaper to upgrade to a Microsoft-based platform than proceed with open source.

Is Microsoft infringing upon Xerox, Apple and Unix intellectual property?

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Microsoft

Intellectual Property is a term widely abused in the software industry by firms such as Microsoft and SCO using it to scare people into not using certain products in favor of their own. This disparaging tactic has even been given a name: Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD).

Making manpages work for you

Filed under
HowTos

Once upon a time, Linux was a hacker's operating system, in the sense that only the most dedicated and enthusiastic computer geeks had the motivation and skill to make sense of it and make it work for them. That has been changing for several years, but to really understand Linux, to be more than a mere end user, you should still learn to navigate the command line interface. One of the most important skills to have for navigating the command line in Linux is the ability to use manpages.

Seven tips for leading FOSS programmers

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HowTos

Books about management techniques rarely mention how to lead computer programmers. The few that do sooner or later reach for a cliché and compare the effort to herding cats -- J. Hank Rainwater, for instance, uses the phrase as his title. Partly, the comparison reflects how much the topic is outside the corporate mainstream. However, the comparison also reflects the conflicting nature of the job. The typical IT department represents a separate culture within a company, and a successful manager must both understand that culture and act as a bridge between it and the rest of the company, trying to explain each to the other.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: Simplenote, GNU Parallel, Eye Care

  • Simplenote Adds a Distraction-Free Focus Mode
    A distraction-free focus mode has been added to the nifty note taking app Simplenote. The feature is one of several improvements the desktop client picks up in its latest update, and is freely available for Windows, macOS, and Linux users. Mobile apps for iOS and Android are also available. Famed for its markdown support in particular, Simplenote is a frill-free note taking app dedicated to the taking and organising of text notes.
  • GNU Parallel 20181022 ('Khashoggi') released
    GNU Parallel 20181022 ('Khashoggi') has been released.
  • Eye Care: Best Free Linux Software to Look after your Eyes
    Many people who regularly use computers suffer from eye strain and fatigue. Looking at a monitor for a long time can strain your eyes or can make any other problems you are having with your eyes seem more apparent. There is also research to show that late-night exposure to bright lights can affect sleep quality. This can be mitigated by reducing blue-light exposure. There are lots of simple steps you can take to reduce eye strain and fatigue. These include adjusting the brightness, contrast settings, and text size displayed, as well as minimizing glare, and ensuring your room has proper lighting. Taking regular breaks is also very important. Some monitors go further offering various eye care technologies including flicker-free technology, and an ultra-low blue light filter with different filter settings. But even if your display offers eye care technology and it’s well designed e.g. offering hotkeys that let you easily adjust filter settings. there’s still a good case to use a software solution as well. This is because the software typically offers more flexibility, such as the ability to automatically adjust the backlight and screen temperature based on the ambient brightness in your surroundings, or on a time schedule.

Mozilla: Firefox 63, TenFourFox FPR10, Servo Progress

  • Firefox 63 Released with Tab Switcher Changes, More Robust Web Extensions
    Firefox 63 is the first version of the web browser to run web extensions (previously known as add-ons) in their own processes on Linux systems. Firefox already runs “out-of-process extensions” in its Windows and Mac builds. Although largely a technical change it should lead to some tangible performance benefits, and help improve the overall security and stability of Firefox. Should an add-on crash or have a memory leak it can no longer take the rest of the browser (or its tabs) with it.
  • Cameron Kaiser: TenFourFox FPR10 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 10 final is now available (downloads, hashes, release notes). This version is live now. Other than outstanding security updates, in this version I also retracted the change (by flipping the pref) for unique data URL origins in issue 525 because of some reported add-on incompatibility. I'm looking at a way add-ons can get around this with their existing code for FPR11, but you're warned: many sites rely on this behaviour to reduce their cross-site scriping surface, and we will have to turn it back on sooner or later. The changes for FPR11 (December) and FPR12 will be smaller in scope mostly because of the holidays and my parallel work on the POWER9 JIT for Firefox on the Talos II. For the next couple FPRs I'm planning to do more ES6 work (mostly Symbol and whatever else I can shoehorn in) and to enable unique data URI origins, and possibly get requestIdleCallback into a releaseable state. Despite the slower pace, however, we will still be tracking the Firefox release schedule as usual.
  • RGSoC wrap-up - Supporting Responsive Images in Servo
    Hey everyone, this is Nupur Baghel and Paavini Nanda, from the team “101 Days of Summer”. Both of us are computer engineering undergraduate students from New Delhi, India. We were involved with Servo this summer under the Rails Girls Summer of Code program and spent an amazing 3 months implementing functionalities to support responsive images in Servo <3
  • This Week In Servo 116
    In the past weeks, we merged 61 PRs in the Servo organization’s repositories.

RISC OS Liberated

  • Acorn Computer's RISC OS operating system finally goes fully open source
    RISC OS, the operating system that powered Acorn Computer's Archimedes computers in the 1980s and 1990s, has been fully released to open source. The move was welcomed by Raspberry Pi CEO Eben Upton: "RISC OS is a great demonstration of how much performance a well-tuned operating system and user interface can wring out of a platform. Moving to a free open source licence should bring a renewed interest to RISC OS." The shift to open source will enable the operating system to be used in new environments and markets, according to RISC OS Developments director Andrew Rawnsley. "This move unlocks a lot of opportunities for RISC OS that were previously inaccessible due to former licence restrictions. We look forward to seeing the exciting projects that this makes possible," said Rawnsley.
  • Roughly 30 years after its birth at UK's Acorn Computers, RISC OS 5 is going open source
    RISC OS was designed and developed by Acorn Computers, once dubbed the Apple of Britain, in the 1980s to run on the fledgling 32-bit Arm processor family, also designed by Acorn. Yes, the Arm that now powers the world's smartphones, embedded electronics, Internet-of-Things, and more, although it's come a long way since its mid-1980s genesis. The operating system, meanwhile, began life as the rough-around-the-edges Arthur 1.20 in 1987 for the ARM2-powered Archimedes A305 and A310, and by 1989, had morphed into the more slick RISC OS 2, written mostly in handcrafted assembly language for performance and memory-footprint reasons.

Android Leftovers