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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 11 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Open source to help Wales protect environment Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 9:58pm
Story NVIDIA Releases 331.89 Long-Lived Linux Driver Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 9:44pm
Story After Ubuntu, Windows will also follow KDE’s convergence story Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 9:36pm
Story [Fedora] Simple Patch Policy Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 9:31pm
Story How Card.com Is Securing Itself and Its Users With Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 9:20pm
Story Why Android One was Google’s most important announcement at I/O Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 9:16pm
Story Qualcomm DMCA Notice Takes Down 100+ Git Repositories Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 8:58pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 8:56pm
Story PCManFM 1.2.1 File Manager Released with Numerous Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 8:56pm
Story Cinnamon 2.2 in Mint 17 ‘Qiana’ [Overview & Screenshots] Rianne Schestowitz 04/07/2014 - 8:08pm

Savage: The Battle for Newerth

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Savage: The Battle for Newerth, created and released by S2Games in the Summer of 2003, is a unique FPS/RTS online game. It combines first and third person combat with RTS elements such as structures, AI workers, and a team commander. On a good online server up to 64 players can easily play without any lag.

OpenXML sneaks up behind ODF - lets make it stop

Filed under
OSS

It seems that Microsoft are working to “fast track” their OpenXML format to become a new European ISO/IEC standard. So what do we do? Well, we have until 5th Feb 2007 to make complaints.

Red Hat's Volley on Linux Management Offering

Filed under
Linux

Call it Red Hat's forward spin velocity regarding Linux management tools. With competition such as Oracle offering full Red Hat support on their own products, Red Hat is now expanding and improving its Linux management footprint.

A Vista vs. Linux matchup

Filed under
OS

In this multi-part series, DesktopLinux.com columnist and operating system curmudgeon Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols pits Microsoft's latest wares -- Vista -- against Linux's fair haired boy -- Ubuntu -- to see how the pinnacle of commercial desktop operating systems stacks up against the free, community-developed Linux upstart.

Also: Desktop Linux 2006: The Year in Review

Penguin Prophecies

Filed under
Linux

It’s that time of year — the time when every IT pundit worth his or her salt is required to publish a New Year’s list of predictions or resolutions. So, being Linux Magazine’s equivalent of Professor Marvel (from the 1939 film classic The Wizard of Oz), who has a talent for seeing the patently obvious, I’m here to take my shot.

PCLinuxOS, Distros, and 10 reasons to try PCLinuxOS.

Filed under
Linux

I wonder if there is a survey that has information on how many different distros a typical Linux user has used over that last 5 years? Of course, I mean more than just an install trial where you experiment with a distro for a few days, then wipe or replace that distro.

For me, that number is a fairly conservative two. And one of those two distros is the (grown up) child of another.

Lesser known "mini" Linux runs from RAM

Filed under
Linux

Mustang Linux, a fork of Buffalo Linux and a newcomer to the "mini" Linux distribution field, achieved a v2.3.1 release earlier this month. The lightweight distro, which can run entirely from RAM, is based on a 2.6.16 kernel and offers a choice of desktops, the project team said.

UbuCon NYC: Ubuntu Conference at Google/NYC Offices Feb 16

Filed under
Ubuntu

I am happy to tell you about the 2nd UbuCon, an Ubuntu user and
developer event, to take place at Google’s New York City offices on
February 16.

Closed source use of the open source model

Filed under
OSS

One big trend of this decade that has not been remarked-upon enough is how many closed source or proprietary products have adopted elements of the open source business model.

Linux sees big growth in China, despite problems

Filed under
Linux

China's Linux industry is slated for a 28% increase in growth through the years 2006-2010. Despite its success, there are many hurdles to overcome - mainly improving compatibility issues.

Read more

GNOME 2.17.90 Released!

Filed under
Software

Yet another GNOME release is now available. This is our sixth
development release on our road towards GNOME 2.18.0, which will be
released in March 2007. This release marks the start of the UI Freeze.

PC-BSD Day 5: Gaming

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

For Day 5, I reinstalled, and set out to answer the following question: how is PC-BSD as a gaming platform? Since fun trumps work every time, Day 5 was dedicated to installing games.

Also: PC-BSD Conclusion

BT still 'not fulfilling' GPL

Filed under
OSS

BT has still not done enough to fulfill the requirements of the General Public License, according to the Freedom Taskforce.

kubuntu vs MS ISA Proxy ft apt-get

Getting adept at updates behind enemy lines, a quick guide to get your updates running through MS ISA Proxy. Also known as NTLMAPS to the rescue!

Pardus gives Linux a custom lift

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Apart from a KDE desktop and applications, the developers of the Pardus 2007 Linux distribution have built an entire distribution from scratch. Pardus, released last month, has its own multilingual installer, custom dependency-resolving package manager, and an INIT system that slashes boot times by several seconds. The distribution has come a long way since its first release in 2005, when it was based on Gentoo and lacked a package manager. Thanks to its custom tools, it's one of the easiest Linux distribution to run and manage.

Back Up Linux And Windows Systems With BackupPC

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can back up Linux and Windows systems with BackupPC. BackupPC acts as a server and is installed on a Linux system, and from there it can connect to all Linux and Windows systems in your local network to back them up and restore them without interfering with the user's work on that system.

Linux For The Desktop - Is It Really Time?

Filed under
Linux

Linux for the Desktop is still way to geeky for the average user. I guess my best analogy is to compare Linux to DOS. Linux still seems that way to me and this needs to be modified, changed, simplified, redone, uncomplex, uncomplicated, plain, clear, ………that’s enough.

Also: 2007, the Year of the Penguin

Dunc-Tank: Success or failure?

Filed under
Interviews

The Dunc-Tank project has been the topic of much debate in the Debian community since it was launched in September last year. It has now been more than a month since the scheduled release of Debian 4.0, codenamed etch. However, even with Dunc-Tank's funding, etch is yet to be seen.

Red Hat is under siege

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat is under siege. When Oracle launched a direct attack on Red Hat's business model last October, Red Hat's share price sank by 24 per cent. And this week it added management tools to its Linux support service. Now, it's not alone: Sun has thrown Solaris into the mix.

What is this vigr program thingy?

Filed under
HowTos

Here you are spending a few pleasant moments running a critical eye over your directory system when you are suddenly quite alarmed. Staring you accusingly in the face is a program thingy called "vigr". Oh No! You think.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE4 and Plasma 5 for Slackware

  • KDE4 and Qt4 deprecation in FreeBSD
    This is a reminder — for those who don’t read all of the FreeBSD mailing lists — that KDE4 is marked deprecated in the official ports tree for FreeBSD, and will be removed at the end of this year (in about 20 days). Then Qt4 will be removed from the official ports tree in mid-march. Since both pieces of software are end-of-life and unmaintained upstream already for several years, the kde@ team at FreeBSD no longer can maintain them. Recent time-sinks were dealing with OpenSSL 1.1.1, libressl, C++17, .. the code is old, and there’s newer, nicer, better-maintained code available generally by replacing 4 with 5.
  • KDE Plasma 5 for Slackware – end of the year edition
    I just uploaded a whole new batch of packages containing KDE Plasma5 for Slackware. The previous batch, KDE 5_18.10 is already two months old and has some library compatibility issues. The new KDE 5_18.12 for Slackware consists of KDE Frameworks 5.53.0, Plasma 5.14.4 and Applications 18.08.3. All this on top of Qt 5.11.3. Compiled on the latest Slackware -current, it’s running smoothly here on my laptop. I decided against upgrading to QT 5.12.0. This is a new LTS release, but I will wait for the other distros to find bugs in this new software. Next week, KDE will release KDE Applications 18.12.0 and that too is something I want to check a bit before releasing Slackware packages. Therefore it’s likely that a new batch of packages containing Qt 5.12 and KDE Applications 18.12 will see the light shortly after the New Year.

Programming: GCC, LLVM, Rust, Ruby and Python

  • GCC 9 Guts Out The PowerPC SPE Support
    It should come as no surprise since it was deprecated in this year's GCC 8 release, but the PowerPC SPE code has been removed. This isn't to be confused with conventional POWER/PowerPC but rather PowerPC SPE that is for the "Signal Processing Engine" on older FreeScale/IBM cores like the e500. It's not all that important these days and doesn't affect newer versions of the 64-bit Power support.
  • LLVM's OpenMP Runtime Picks Up DragonFlyBSD & OpenBSD Support
    Good news for those using the LLVM Clang compiler on OpenBSD or DragonFlyBSD: the OpenMP run-time should now be supported with the latest development code.
  • Nick Cameron: Rust in 2022
    In case you missed it, we released our second edition of Rust this year! An edition is an opportunity to make backwards incompatible changes, but more than that it's an opportunity to bring attention to how programming in Rust has changed. With the 2018 edition out of the door, now is the time to think about the next edition: how do we want programming in Rust in 2022 to be different to programming in Rust today? Once we've worked that out, lets work backwards to what should be done in 2019. Without thinking about the details, lets think about the timescale and cadence it gives us. It was three years from Rust 1.0 to Rust 2018 and I expect it will be three years until the next edition. Although I think the edition process went quite well, I think that if we'd planned in advance then it could have gone better. In particular, it felt like there were a lot of late changes which could have happened earlier so that we could get more experience with them. In order to avoid that I propose that we aim to avoid breaking changes and large new features landing after the end of 2020. That gives 2021 for finishing, polishing, and marketing with a release late that year. Working backwards, 2020 should be an 'impl year' - focussing on designing and implementing the things we know we want in place for the 2021 edition. 2019 should be a year to invest while we don't have any release pressure. To me, investing means paying down technical debt, looking at our processes, infrastructure, tooling, governance, and overheads to see where we can be more efficient in the long run, and working on 'quality of life' improvements for users, the kind that don't make headlines but will make using Rust a better experience. It's also the time to investigate some high-risk, high-reward ideas that will need years of iteration to be user-ready; 2019 should be an exciting year!
  • A Java Developer Walks Into A Ruby Conference: Charles Nutter’s Open Source Journey
    As a Java developer, Nutter began looking for an existing way to run Ruby within a Java runtime environment, specifically a Java virtual machine (JVM). This would let Ruby programs run on any hardware or software platform supported by a JVM, and would facilitate writing polyglot applications that used some Java and some Ruby, with developers free to choose whichever language was best for a particular task.
  • Good ciphers in OpenJDK
  • Don’t delete the same file in its own directory
  • Create a home button on the pause scene

Audiocasts/Shows: Going Linux, Linux Thursday and More

  • Going Linux #358 · Listener Feedback
    This month we have voice feedback from Paul, suggestions on alternatives for G+, a question on OpenVPN, feedback and problems moving to Linux. Troy provides a Going Linux story on software for Linux users.
  • Linux Thursday - Dec 6, 2018
  • Gnocchi: A Scalable Time Series Database For Your Metrics with Julien Danjou - Episode 189
    Do you know what your servers are doing? If you have a metrics system in place then the answer should be “yes”. One critical aspect of that platform is the timeseries database that allows you to store, aggregate, analyze, and query the various signals generated by your software and hardware. As the size and complexity of your systems scale, so does the volume of data that you need to manage which can put a strain on your metrics stack. Julien Danjou built Gnocchi during his time on the OpenStack project to provide a time oriented data store that would scale horizontally and still provide fast queries. In this episode he explains how the project got started, how it works, how it compares to the other options on the market, and how you can start using it today to get better visibility into your operations.

Best Lightweight Linux Distros for Older Computers

Don’t throw away that old Pentium III tower and CRT monitor just yet! While that old laptop in the closet may not be able to run Windows 10 or macOS Mojave, it doesn’t mean it’s destined for the dump. Many Linux distributions are made specifically for utilizing the ancient, underpowered hardware found in older machines. By installing these lightweight distros, you can breathe new life into an old PC thought to be long past its prime. Here are the best lightweight Linux distros that we’ve picked out from the pile. Read more