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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Best FTP App for Linux srlinuxx 1 07/04/2012 - 1:32am
Story SUSE Linux: 20 Years and Going Strong srlinuxx 06/04/2012 - 9:27pm
Story Meet the Linux Tycoon tycoon srlinuxx 06/04/2012 - 9:26pm
Story Wild Visionary Wants To Turn His Linux Company Into The Next Apple srlinuxx 06/04/2012 - 9:24pm
Blog entry XBMCbuntu Eden on the ASRock 330 fieldyweb 06/04/2012 - 9:01pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 06/04/2012 - 6:45am
Story The Open Source Commandments: 2012 Edition srlinuxx 06/04/2012 - 12:58am
Story The State of Linux Wireless. Is it better yet? srlinuxx 05/04/2012 - 10:28pm
Story Linux Mint Update Pack 4 is out srlinuxx 05/04/2012 - 10:15pm
Story Should you be worried about Ubuntu Desktop’s privacy settings? srlinuxx 05/04/2012 - 10:13pm

A Cluster by Any Other Name Is Not a Grid

Filed under
Linux

Have you noticed how lately, when the conversation turns to distributed computing, grid and cluster are used as synonyms? These two words do have different meanings, Donald Becker reminds us.

The Road to Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat will be hosting monthly events at its Centennial Campus headquarters to familiarize folks with open source and maybe find a few new recruits as well. Free Pizza!!!

In related news: Red Hat Could Show More Operating-Margin Leverage

Linux well-represented at DARPA robot vehicle challenge

Filed under
Linux

In its first-hand, preliminary coverage of the qualification rounds leading up to the event, TG Daily reports that "most of the teams are using Linux/Unix variants."

New openSUSE project: Better Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Better Desktop is a project dedicated to sharing usability data with Linux developers. Over the past year, we have conducted many usability tests on different parts of the KDE and GNOME desktops.

March of the Penguins in Portland

Filed under
Linux

Penguin Day Portland will "bring together nonprofit staff, tech providers, geeks, consultants, and open source software developers for a day of learning and conversation."

GNOME to fish in embedded Linux pond

Filed under
Software

The team developing the open source desktop environment claims to have made 'very significant improvements' in performance and memory usage, as they target the embedded market with future versions.

Pity poor Microsoft's midlife crisis

Filed under
Microsoft

As the champagne flowed in Seattle, things didn't seem quite right. The share price is flat - and has been for quite a while. It's getting harder and harder to persuade customers to upgrade and the threat of open-source software grows by the hour. Not to mention Google.

Opening Windows

Filed under
Microsoft

Since its very inception, Microsoft has held that cash for code is king. But the company is slowly, grudgingly, and cautiously treading into Open Source.

Interview: IBM's top Linux expert

Filed under
Linux

Irving Wladawsky-Berger, vice president, Technical Strategy and Innovation, IBM, attributes the success of the OS to this growing community of Linux contributors and speak out about the past, present and future of Linux.

In related news: IBM: Workers' genetic data off limits

Open Source Agreed by UN WSIS

Filed under
OSS

Encouragement for the use of free and open source software and open standards for science and technology has quietly worked its way into the draft texts being prepared for the November second phase of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS).

Red Hat CEO unmoved by Linux consolidation

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat's CEO has rejected the idea that a reduction in the number of Linux distributions would be good for the industry, and described Novell's acquisition of SUSE Linux as "theatre".

CeBIT Australia 2006

Filed under
OSS

CeBIT Australia, the largest Information and Communications Technology (ICT) event for business in the region, has announced cooperation with a number of associations and organisations, in setting up targeted exhibition programs for CeBIT Australia 2006.

NSW government Linux plan close to fruition

Filed under
Linux

A protracted NSW government project to give its agencies cheaper and quicker access to Linux and open source software is reaching fruition with several vendors preparing to sign contracts as pre-approved suppliers.

Linux stars in MS movie

Filed under
Linux

In a stroke of irony, Microsoft's Halo movie will be produced in Wellington by servers running the open-source Linux operating system.

Nintendo sets Revolution launch price at $99?

Filed under
Gaming

The latest Nintendo Revolution rumor to hit the web is a doozie… “Nintendo may be aiming for a $99 launch price.” Can we expect the system to be only a fraction as powerful as the PlayStation 3 or Xbox 360?

MySQL wants to be Ikea of the database market

Filed under
Software

MySQL AB's imminent release of its MySQL 5.0 database will introduce new enterprise features making it more competitive with Oracle, IBM, and Microsoft, but the company's CEO has maintained that it is more interested in mimicking the run-away success of Swedish retailer Ikea than any of the established database vendors.

The 2005 Ig Nobel Prize Winners

Filed under
Misc

Winners include a team who watched a glob of tar drip from a funnel for 80 years, a veterinarian for dog testicle replacement, and a team for their article on "Pressures Produced When Penguins Pooh."

Is Google taking over the universe?

Filed under
Web

Seemingly every week brings a new announcement from the Mountain View Googleplex, each one bigger than the last and each provoking wide-eyed speculation -- and confusion -- about the 7-year-old company's ambitions.

n/a

OSS in the enterprise? Show me the money

Filed under
OSS

Eric Raymond's recent attack on a Microsoft recruiter has sharply divided the Linux community, with some applauding his bluntness and honesty, while others accused him of exaggerating his own achievements.

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More in Tux Machines

Honor 9 Lite review: Leader of the affordable Android pack

As Huawei's budget brand, Honor handsets are well known for offering good value for money. With the Honor 9 Lite the 'good value' theme is raised a notch, thanks to an 18:9 aspect ratio 5.65-inch screen and no fewer than four cameras. Judging by its name, you might expect the Honor 9 Lite to be a trimmed-down version of the Honor 9, but there are some significant variances that suggest the new handset is a step sideways rather than a step down. The Honor 9's 5.15-inch 1,080-by-1,920 (16:9) screen is trumped here by a bigger, taller 5.65-inch 1,080-by-2,160 (18:9) display. There are also dual cameras front and back, whereas the Honor 9 only has dual rear cameras. At the time of writing the Honor 9 is selling for £349 (inc. VAT) direct from Honor, so the Honor 9 Lite's £199.99 looks very appealing. Read more

Linux command history: Choosing what to remember and how

Linux history – the record of commands that you’ve used on the command line – can simplify repeating commands and provide some very useful information when you’re trying to track down how recent system or account changes might have come about. Two things you need to understand before you begin your sleuthing, however, are that the shell’s command memory can be selective and that dates and times for when commands were run are optional. Read more

Security: Voting Machines With Windows and Back Doors in Windows Help Crypto-jacking

  • Election Security a High Priority — Until It Comes to Paying for New Voting Machines [Ed: Sadly, the US has outsourced its voting machines to a private company whose systems are managed by Microsoft]
    When poll workers arrived at 6 a.m. to open the voting location in Allentown, New Jersey, for last November’s gubernatorial election, they found that none of the borough’s four voting machines were working. Their replacements, which were delivered about four hours later, also failed. Voters had to cast their ballots on paper, which then were counted by hand. Machine malfunctions are a regular feature of American elections. Even as worries over cybersecurity and election interference loom, many local jurisdictions depend on aging voting equipment based on frequently obsolete and sometimes insecure technology. And the counties and states that fund elections have dragged their heels on providing the money to buy new equipment.
  • Congress Can Act Right Now to Prevent Interference in the 2018 Elections [Ed: "confidence" is not security]

    To create that confidence the SAFE Act would: [...]

  • America’s Election Meddling Would Indeed Justify Other Countries Retaliating In Kind
    There is still no clear proof that the Russian government interfered with the 2016 U.S. election in any meaningful way. Which is weird, because Russia and every other country on earth would be perfectly justified in doing so.
  • NSA Exploit Now Powering Cryptocurrency Mining Malware [Ed: Microsoft Windows back door]
    You may have been asked if you'd like to try your hand at mining cryptocurrency. You may have demurred, citing the shortage in graphics cards or perhaps wary you were being coaxed into an elaborate Ponzi scheme. So much for opting out. Thanks to the NSA, you may be involved in mining cryptocurrency, but you're likely not seeing any of the benefits.
  • Cryptocurrency-mining criminals that netted $3 million gear up for more
    Separately, researchers from security firm FireEye said attackers, presumably with no relation to the one reported by Check Point, are exploiting unpatched systems running Oracle's WebLogic Server to install cryptocurrency-mining malware. Oracle patched the vulnerability, indexed as CVE-2017-10271, in October.

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