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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New Goodies Coming in LibreOffice 4.2 Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 7:59am
Story KDevelop 4.6 Improves Its UI, GDB Support, PHP Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 7:52am
Story Fedora Memory Comparison Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 7:47am
Story Linux-based TOR gadget protects IP identity Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 7:37am
Story A Plexible Pi Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2013 - 6:42am
Story Budapest district debunks misgivings over open source Roy Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 10:19pm
Story Out in the Open: How to Resurrect a Dead Open Source Project Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 10:09pm
Story NVIDIA Helping Nouveau With Video Decoding Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 10:00pm
Story HP Launches Portal to Sell Its Software Online Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:54pm
Story Moto G Goes Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 09/12/2013 - 9:47pm

Opera v9.0 Browser Screenshots

Filed under
Software

Coming out of Norway this morning is the long awaited Opera 9, after previous Beta/preview releases. Opera 9 is focused on being efficient, productive, secure, stylish, and innovative. Some of the new items in Opera 9.0 include Bit Torrent, content blocker, Widgets, site preferences, and more. Here at Phoronix we have a few shots up of Opera v9.0 under Linux.

Gentoo Store Updates

Filed under
Gentoo

The Gentoo Store has updated its selection of clothing and schwag. The main addition is the new line-up of women's clothing sporting the Gentoo logo. This was done after requests were made from a few forums users, as well as to help with the proposed Gentoo Women project. Also, some new stickers and other items have been added to the Schwag section of the store, including a nice Gentoo wall clock. Updated CD media will be available after 2006.1 is released.

Dock any application to the system tray

Filed under
Software

Wouldn't it be nice if you could dock any application, and not just those that support the docking feature, into the system tray? A simple point-and-click operation is all it takes, thanks to a couple of helpful applications called KDocker and Alltray.

Stable Kernel release: 2.6.17.1

Filed under
Linux

Chris Wright and the -stable team have already put out a 2.6.17.1 Linux kernel just a few days after the final .17 release. This one contains a small fix for a loop in sctp.

Also: Kernel release: 2.6.16.21

Run Windows On Linux: Win4Lin Revisited

Filed under
Software

If you are a Windows user who interacts with Linux on a regular or occasional basis, you will eventually feel disenfranchised. For those brave souls who migrate away from Windows and into the Linux realm there will always be a void left where Windows functionality is unmatched on the Linux platform, or where Linux lacks a suitable replacement. Win4Lin provides a happy middle ground.

Keep Tabs on Network Services with Nagios, Pt. 2

Filed under
HowTos

Last week we provided a brief overview of Nagios, and explained how it can make your infrastructure monitoring fun and easy. As promised, we'd like to talk a bit more about the configuration files. Nagios does more than just monitor services, so after some configuration clarifications we'll shift focus to explore the more creative uses of Nagios.

How the net was lost

Filed under
Web

Those who currently struggle to maintain what is called “Net Neutrality” on the internet I think have taken too limited an approach to their struggle. What they ask is to maintain an existing status quo that had already been eroded from the original promise and potential of the internet against those who wish to change it even further. It would be far better to challenge it by fighting to actively restore the rights of all internet users.

Also: Whose Net Is It, Anyway?

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Opera 9 Final released, includes BitTorrent support

Filed under
Software

Opera 9 is Here!

Opera 9 is now available for download! Take a look at the future of Web browsing with the new stuff in Opera 9, including: widgets, BitTorrent support, content blocking, tab preview, source viewer and much more.

Can VMware's open standards moves halt Microsoft?

Filed under
Misc

Microsoft is coming -- this much virtualisation market leader VMware knows. But the company, led by Diane Greene, seems to know exactly how to stave off the software giant. But is it enough?

My desktop OS: Microsoft Windows XP Professional

Filed under
Microsoft

Though I dabble with GNU/Linux through the Kubuntu 6.06 installation on an older, less powerful machine, the system I use most often is running Microsoft Windows XP. Despite my choice of operating systems, I use open source software whenever possible.

Tutorial: Triple-boot Win XP, Linux and OS X on an Intel Mac

Filed under
Mac
HowTos

Apple is, after all, a hardware company, and if Linux and Windows users can now buy Macs safe in the knowledge that they can use both their favourite OS and Mac OS X, or perhaps even all three, on their new machine, they may well see greater adoption in the marketplace.

Linux Peanut Gallery Razzes Microsoft Transition

Filed under
Linux

Last week's Microsoft succession news sparked an array of definitely NOT-for-attribution-comments from those who've watched the company forever. One IM buddy with Linux proclivities rejoiced when it became clear that Gates was stepping back.

Also: Will Gates' Exit Turn Out To Be A Lie?

New generation of browers emerges

Filed under
Software

The major Web browsers are getting facelifts as they increasingly become the place for handling business transactions and running programs over the Internet rather than simply displaying sites.

10 Things a new Linux user needs to unlearn

Filed under
Humor

OK, you have Linux on your computer. Maybe you had some trouble getting it installed and everything working, but you are past all that, everything is working, and you are ready to start using the computer. Old habits die hard, so hopefully this list helps you get over them.

Novell delays SUSE 10 release

Filed under
SUSE

According to a Novell Inc. confidential memo dated June 14, Novell will be slightly delaying its next release of both the server and desktop versions of SUSE Linux Enterprise 10 "to address final issues with our new package management, registration, and update system and also fix the remaining blocker defects."

Hacao linux 2.0 released !

Filed under
Others

Hacao linux, Vietnamese Puppy Linux version 2.0 released. The live-CD iso file is 92M. The big items in this release is Full Vietnamese localization.

The $100 laptop Cranks Up

Filed under
Hardware

The hand-cranked, $100 notebook computer aimed at helping poor children globally will make its debut in about two weeks, its developer said Monday.

MySQL Mistakenly Shares Customer E-mail Addresses

Filed under
Security

A mass e-mail sent out last week by open-source database vendor MySQL erroneously contained the e-mail addresses of about 9,300 customers instead of information on a series of software-support special offers that the company meant to publicize.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

today's leftovers

Games: Atari VCS Console, Humble Store and TUNG (The Ultimate Nerd Game)

  • Atari VCS Console Runs a Custom Linux Distro Called “AtariOS”
    Following criticism of its mediocre internal makeup the Ataris VCS console will now ship with 8GB RAM by default, up from the 4GB proposed during the funding push. It’s a decent increase in memory that should help the system cope better with more intensive indie games (don’t expect AAA titles to play nicely on the machine with the middling AMD Bristol Ridge APU).
  • Humble Store is doing a 'Pixel Perfect Platformers Sale' and it has some top Linux games for cheap
    For those of you who love your platformers, regardless of them being 2D, 3D, puzzle or action adventures there's bound to be something for the bored Linux gamer in the Humble Store Pixel Perfect Platformers Sale.
  • TUNG (The Ultimate Nerd Game) made me realise how stupid I really am
    The Ultimate Nerd Game or TUNG for short, is a first-person sandbox game about building intricate machines and it made me feel so very dumb. If you loved Minecraft's Redstone circuits or anything remotely similar, this is probably a free game you're going to love. For me, it was an exercise in frying my brain like it's in a microwave.

OSS Leftovers

  • Pharmaceutical industry gets first open source platform for Level 4 serialization
    Pharmaceutical companies today for the first time have an open source alternative for level 4 serialization with the launch of QU4RTET, a platform that provides them with new flexibility, transparency and affordability as they comply with global drug anti-counterfeiting laws.
  • Kontron Uses Open Source to Move Beyond Bare Metal
    Kontron, a company known for its embedded computing technology, is leveraging virtualization and open source to become a direct supplier to large service providers, promising to integrate hardware and operating system software with best-of-breed virtual network functions. That new sales strategy has evolved to support containers, particularly as they fit at the edge of the network, which for Kontron AG is the cell tower. In May, Kontron announced that its integrated SYMKLOUD open source platform now supports the latest versions of OpenStack for virtual machines and bare metal, as well as Kubernetes v1.10 for Docker and containers, via its distribution partnership with Canonical.
  • Open Source Expands In Finance With The FINOS Platform
  • Global Open Source Services Market Forecast to 2025 Published by Marketresearchnest
  • Synopsys ARC HS4x Processors Now Supported By GCC
    The GCC 8 compiler brought the Synopsys ARC CPU target while for the GCC 9 release is going to be support for the company's HS4x processors. Merged today to mainline GCC is support for the HS4x CPUs within the ARC target. Adding this newer generation of ARC processors to the GNU Compiler Collection code-base was just a few hundred lines of code with building off the existing target code.
  • GPL Cooperation Commitment gets more support for open source licensing
    Red Hat has announced its open source license enforcement initiative is making new strides. As part of the GPL Cooperation Commitment, 14 new companies have joined the effort to promote greater predictability for GPLv2 and LGPLv2.x licenses. “Through this initiative, we hope ultimately to increase participation in the use and development of open source software by helping to ensure that enforcement, when it takes place, is fair and predictable,” according to the commitment’s website.
  • The Global IP Exchange: Human ingenuity and open source technology
    He said: “Customers do increasingly care about open source, and if you don’t comply you are at risk of upsetting authors, as well as litigation and injunctions.” “If you’re just distributing internally, then you’re fine, but as soon as it leaves your company, then you’ve triggered an obligation.” For those who don’t comply, he warned that either the licensor, or the Free Software Foundation will find out.
  • How to Setup Python Virtual Environment on Ubuntu 18.04
    Python is a versatile programming language that can be used for many different programming projects(Web - Mobile - Desktop). Easy to set up, and written in a relatively straightforward style with immediate feedback on errors, Python is a great choice for beginners and experienced developers alike. Python 3 is the most current version of the language and is considered to be the future of Python. This article will guide you through installing Python 3 on your local Linux machine and setting up a programming virtual environment via the command line. This article will explicitly cover the installation procedures for Ubuntu 18.04, but the general principles apply to any other distribution of Debian Linux.
  • How expensive is globbing for sources in large projects
    Since we have the measurement script, let's use it for something more interesting. Modules are an upcoming C++ feature to increase build times and a ton of other coolness depending on who you ask. The current specification works by having a kind of "module export declaration" at the beginning of source files. The idea is that you first compile those to generate a sort of a module declaration file and then you can start the actual compilation that uses said files. If you thought "waitaminute, that sounds exactly like how FORTRAN is compiled", you are correct. Because of this it has the same problem that you can't compile source files in an arbitrary order, but instead you must first somehow scan them to find out the interdependencies between source (not header) files. In practice what this means is that instead of single-phase compilation all files must be processed twice. All scan operations must be done before any compilation jobs can start because otherwise you might start to compile a file before its dependencies are fully processed. The scanning can be done in one of two ways. Either the build system scans the sources meaning it needs to understand the syntax of source files or the compiler can be invoked in a special preprocessing mode. Note that build systems such as Ninja do not do any such operations by themselves but instead always invoke external processes to do their work.
  • Security updates for Monday