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Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Windows offers new vistas of spending

Filed under
Microsoft

People wanting to upgrade to Windows Vista are likely to need not only a new computer with more robust hardware, but a new monitor as well.

Mozilla Foundation Reorganization

Filed under
Moz/FF

On August 3rd, 2005, the Mozilla Foundation, a non-profit public benefit software development organization, launched a wholly owned subsidiary, the Mozilla Corporation. The Mozilla Corporation is a taxable subsidiary that serves the non-profit, public benefit goals of its parent, the Mozilla Foundation, and will be responsible for product development, marketing and distribution of Mozilla products.

Documents censored in Microsoft-Google case

Filed under
Legal

Microsoft Corp. documents concerning a former executive who went to rival Google Inc. can't be sealed but deserve protection because they contain trade secrets, a judge ruled yesterday.

Army punishes soldier for blog posts

Filed under
Web

The U.S. military has demoted and fined a soldier for publishing "classified" information on his personal blog, an Army spokesperson confirmed Tuesday.

Novell Plans to Open SuSE Linux Pro to Community

Filed under
SUSE

Novell is opening SuSE Linux to community-based development, sources say, with a model similar to Red Hat's recent move with Fedora.

Sony could wait till '07 to launch PS3

Filed under
Gaming

Sony strategists may see a priced-down PS2 as all the company needs in '06; would ride $99 sticker--and profits--all the way to 2007.

NVIDIA's CEO, Jen-Hsun Huang

Filed under
Hardware

A few weeks prior to the launch on GeForce 7800 GTX, based on NVIDIA's latest G70 chip, NVIDIA held an "Editors Day" to introduce the press to the new architecture and capabilities. Whilst that the Editors Day we got the opportunity to sit down with NVIDIA's CEO and visionary, Jen-Hsun Huang and ask him a few questions...

Phishers hack eBay

Filed under
Security

A flaw has been discovered on eBay’s website that would have allowed fraudsters to successfully redirect the sign-on process to a phishing site.

Lax security enables ATM card fraud, report says

Filed under
Security

An unprecedented wave of Internet-based bank fraud has been enabled in part by banks that don't bother to check security codes on cash cards, according to a report released on Tuesday.

Internet Attacks Increase in Number, Severity

Filed under
Security

As attacks become more targeted, companies will have to be even more aware of how technology could be used against them, said IDC analyst Charles Kolodgy. "Especially if the motivation is money, then attackers will be very aggressive until they get what they want," he said.

Linux Security - Is it Ready For The Average User?

Filed under
Linux

There seems to be a new important security patch out for Linux every month. Can the average Linux user or system administrator keep his or her system secure and still have time to do other things?

Lucasarts and ILM powered by AMD

Filed under
Hardware

In the new Letterman Digital Arts Center will be an AMD64-based data center housing a render farm to allow computers to process data 24 hours a day.

Apple Introduces Mighty Mouse

Filed under
Mac

Apple(R) today introduced Mighty Mouse, its next generation mouse with several innovative new features that make using a Mac(R) even more powerful and easy.

Open source at LinuxWorld could blow away software slump

Filed under
OSS

The twice-yearly LinuxWorld Conference & Expo provides an opportunity to check the pulse of the open source community. This time around, I expect to see more new open source products unveiled than ever before at this show. In this column, I'll predict a few.

EU lawmakers threaten open source

Filed under
OSS

A proposed European law on intellectual-property infringement could allow SCO to sue Linux users in a criminal court, experts warn.

Google now a hacker's tool

Filed under
Security

Somewhere out on the Internet, an Electric Bong may be in danger. The threat: a well-crafted Google query that could allow a hacker to use Google's massive database as a resource for intrusion.

Linux Bluetooth hackers hijack car audio

Filed under
Linux

Linux hackers have demonstrated a way to inject or record audio signals from passing cars running insecure Bluetooth hands-free units.

US firm claims 30bn Euro banknotes infringe its patent

Filed under
Legal

A US-based document security firm yesterday claimed that every Euro banknote in circulation infringes on a patent it owns covering anti-counterfeiting technology.

Linux lab names financial chief

Filed under
Linux

The Open Source Development Labs has named Mike Temple its first chief financial officer, the Linux development consortium said Monday.

Torvalds in renewed Aust Linux trademark push

Filed under
Linux

A lawyer acting on behalf of Linus Torvalds has written to Australian Linux vendors asking them to relinquish any legal claim to the name Linux and purchase a licence for its use from the worldwide trademark owner.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: MapSCII, Notelab, Pageclip, Wine

  • MapSCII – The World Map In Your Terminal
    I just stumbled upon an interesting utility. The World map in the Terminal! Yes, It is so cool. Say hello to MapSCII, a Braille and ASCII world map renderer for your xterm-compatible terminals. It supports GNU/Linux, Mac OS, and Windows. I thought it is a just another project hosted on GitHub. But I was wrong! It is really impressive what they did there. We can use our mouse pointer to drag and zoom in and out a location anywhere in the world map.
  • Notelab – A Digital Note Taking App for Linux
    This post is on an app that brings the power of digital note-taking to PC users across the platform spectrum. If note-taking with a stylus then you would like this one, and in fact, I couldn’t have given Notelab (an open source Java-based application,) a better introduction. The team of creatives has done a good job already.
  • Pageclip – A Server for Your HTML Forms
    Data collection is important to statisticians who need to analyze the data and deduce useful information; developers who need to get feedback from users on how enjoyable their products are to use; teachers who need to carry out census of students and whatever complaints they have, etc. The list goes on. Seeing how convenient it can be to use services that are cloud-based wouldn’t it be nice if you could collect form data in the cloud as easily as creating a new HTML document? Well, Pageclip has come to the rescue.
  • Wine 3.0 Release Lets You Run Windows Applications on Linux More Effectively
    The Wine team has announced the release of Wine 3.0. This comes after one year of development and comes with 6000 individual changes with a number of improvements and new features. ‘This release represents a year of development effort and over 6,000 individual changes. It contains a large number of improvements’. The free and open source compatibility layer, Wine lets you run Windows applications on Linux and macOS. The Wine 3.0 release has as major highlights Direct3D 10 and 11 changes, Direct3D command stream, graphics driver for Android and improved support for DirectWrite and Direct2D.

today's howtos

GNOME: Themes, GTK and More

  • 5 of the Best Linux Dark Themes that Are Easy on the Eyes
    There are several reasons people opt for dark themes on their computers. Some find them easy on the eye while others prefer them because of their medical condition. Programmers, especially, like dark themes because they reduce glare on the eyes. If you are a Linux user and a dark theme lover, you are in luck. Here are five of the best dark themes for Linux. Check them out!
  • GNOME Rolls Out The GTK Text Input Protocol For Wayland
    GNOME developers have been working on a new Wayland protocol, the "gtk_text_input" protocol, which now is implemented in their Mutter compositor. Separate from the zwp_text_input protocol, the gtk_text_input protocol is designed for representing text input and input methods associated with a seat and enter/leave events. This GNOME-catered protocol for Mutter is outlined via this commit with their protocol specification living in-tree to Mutter given its GNOME focus.
  • Wine, Mozilla, GNOME and DragonFly BSD
    While GNOME is moving to remove desktop icon support in version 3.28, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS will continue to ship with an older version of Nautilus (3.26) in an effort to keep this age-old practice alive, at least for its upcoming LTS release. In more GNOME-related news, version 3.28 of the Photos application will include a number of enhancements to its photo-editing arsenal, such as shadows and highlight editing, the ability to alter crop orientation, added support for zoom gestures and more. For a complete list, visit the project's roadmap.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat Satellite: Patch Management Overview and Analysis
    We review Red Hat Satellite, a patch management solution for enterprise Linux systems.
  • Analysts Expect Red Hat Inc (RHT) Will Announce Quarterly Sales of $761.96 Million
  • Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) Shares Move -0.17%
  • A Modularity rethink for Fedora
    We have covered the Fedora Modularity initiative a time or two over the years but, just as the modular "product" started rolling out, Fedora went back to the drawing board. There were a number of fundamental problems with Modularity as it was to be delivered in the Fedora 27 server edition, so a classic version of the distribution was released instead. But Modularity is far from dead; there is a new plan afoot to deliver it for Fedora 28, which is due in May. The problem that Modularity seeks to solve is that different users of the distribution have differing needs for stability versus tracking the bleeding edge. The pain is most often felt in the fast-moving web development world, where frameworks and applications move far more quickly than Fedora as a whole can—even if it could, moving that quickly would be problematic for other types of users. So Modularity was meant to be a way for Fedora users to pick and choose which "modules" (a cohesive set of packages supporting a particular version of, say, Node.js, Django, a web server, or a database management system) are included in their tailored instance of Fedora. The Tumbleweed snapshots feature of the openSUSE rolling distribution is targeted at solving much the same problem. Modularity would also facilitate installing multiple different versions of modules so that different applications could each use the versions of the web framework, database, and web server that the application supports. It is, in some ways, an attempt to give users the best of both worlds: the stability of a Fedora release with the availability of modules of older and newer packages, some of which would be supported beyond the typical 13-month lifecycle of a Fedora release. The trick is in how to get there.