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Friday, 21 Sep 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A closer look at the final beta version of Ubuntu 14.04 Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2014 - 6:05am
Story Widows XP DOA on Apr 8th: FREE THIS ORPHAN !!!! Roy Schestowitz 30/03/2014 - 6:00am
Story Valve Has Come A Long Way: 2 Years Ago They Were Linux Headhunting Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:28pm
Story Benchmarking VirtIO Performance Within DigitalOcean's Cloud Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:20pm
Story Calligra 2.8.1 Office Suite Is a Major Update Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:15pm
Story Swedish Linux Users: Avoid Elgiganten Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 9:03pm
Forum topic Unetbootin joohn1 1 29/03/2014 - 8:16pm
Story Intel Adds Initial Cherryview Support To Their Linux 3D Driver Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 2:56pm
Story Do distrohoppers have too many choices? Rianne Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 2:50pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 29/03/2014 - 12:02pm

Developers are from Mars, Programmers are from Venus

Filed under
Misc

Many of us use the terms "programmer" and "developer" interchangeably. When someone asks me what I do for a living I tend to describe my vocation as "computer programmer" rather than "software developer", because the former seems to be understood more readily by those unfamiliar with IT. Even when writing pieces for this site, I tend to swap back and forth between the two terms, to try and avoid sounding repetitive. But in truth, there is a world of difference between a computer programmer and a software developer.

iXsystems Announces Acquisition of PC-BSD Operating System

Filed under
BSD

iXsystems, an enterprise-class hardware solution provider, announced today its acquisition of PC-BSD, a rock solid UNIX operating system based on FreeBSD. PC-BSD is a fully functional desktop operating system running FreeBSD version 6, with a KDE desktop interface and graphical system installer. Its PBI system, developed exclusively for PC-BSD, lets users download and install their applications in a self-extracting and installing format.

Install songbird in Debian Machine With Screenshots and enjoy Your Music

This is first time songbird installation articlee in debin.Songbird plays the Media Web. Play MP3s without leaving the page. Songbird views Web pages as dynamic playlists to play, save, download or subscribe to.

Songbird plays your music too with all the features you’d expect in a desktop media player. Like Firefox, Songbird’s features may be improved with user installed and contributed cross-platform extensions.

Read Full article here

AI versus AI: N.E.R.O. on Linux

Filed under
Gaming

If you've ever been frustrated with the artificial intelligence (AI) in video games, then you are a prime candidate for Neuro-Evolving Robotic Operatives (N.E.R.O.), a cross-platform combat game where the key to winning is training your own intelligent non-player characters. On the field of play, the only rule is "let the best AI win." I tested my skills with the Linux client, and found N.E.R.O. to be a very different sort of game.

French urged to adopt OpenDocument format

Filed under
OSS

A REPORT commissioned by the French prime minister has called for the country's bureaucrats to adopt the OpenDocument Format.

Ubuntu Seeks Idents on Demo Scene

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth explained at Sundown that Ubuntu is looking into ways to include demoscene animation during the wait for Ubuntu to boot. The project returns to the origins of the demo scene, an identity projected while loading software.

Making Sense of the OLPC Proprietary Software Row

Filed under
OLPC
Interviews

Theo de Raadt, the leader of the OpenBSD project and a vociferous crusader for hardware (especially networking) documentation, recently went public with his concerns about the One Laptop Per Child project's choice to use a wireless networking chip from Marvell, a company with an unusually poor record of supporting free software operating systems, in the 2B1 laptop computer that it is developing.

Open Source madness!

Filed under
OSS

I love free software. I use open-source programs and operating systems every day. But once in a while, I want to take some free software developers and shake them until their teeth rattle.

Updates on Flash Player 9 for Linux

Filed under
Software

There has been some interesting stuff coming out about Flash Player 9 for Linux, and I wanted to put it all in one place for those following the development.

More Here.

Aussie Feds assess open source

Filed under
OSS

FEDERAL government use of open-source software will be examined to assess how many agencies have adopted Linux and other systems.

Google to acquire YouTube for $1.65 billion in stock

Filed under
Google

Google Inc. said Monday it’s buying No. 1 Internet video sharing Web site YouTube Inc. for $1.65 billion in stock. The deal is regarded as a largely defensive one that leapfrogs Google into a leading role in a burgeoning Internet marketplace.

Full Story.

Ray Noorda, Father Of Network Computers, Dies

Filed under
Obits

Ray Noorda, the Novell Inc. founder who battled Microsoft Corp. in the early years of network computers, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 82.

Partition Table Backup

Filed under
HowTos

Many of us are doing backups of all kinds of data: from regular files, databases, to full partitions or hard drives. What I have noticed that very few peoples even think about the partition table.

Book Review: Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks

Filed under
Reviews

I recently came across a very nice book titled "Ubuntu Linux for non-geeks" authored by Rickford Grant and published by No Starch Press. What attracted me to this book was the obvious title which makes no bones about the fact that this book is targeted at non-geeks.

What's the best Linux for beginners?

Filed under
Linux

I recently received a letter from a computer pro who's nearing 80. He's disgusted by "how [Microsoft] things have developed, and how most software is put out there full of errors and omissions. Help is virtually none existent. One really has to dig to find answers." So, here's my list of the best Linuxes for people who just want a working PC.

A look at Firefox 2.0 RC2

Filed under
Moz/FF

The official release of Firefox 2.0 is right around the corner and the second release candidate (RC2) was made available last week. Release candidates provide insight into the features and functionality that will be available in the final release. Much has changed since the Firefox 2.0 alpha builds were made available to the public early this year.

Book review: ImageMagick Tricks

Filed under
Reviews

Command-line utilities can be powerful, but it takes some doing to make a typical desktop user work in the shell. The image manipulation program ImageMagick is one command-line program that gives users a good reason to use the CLI. Now Packt Publishing has released ImageMagick Tricks, a book that covers ImageMagick from the ground up. If you've never used ImageMagick before, this book is a good starting place.

The Scrabble For Open Source

Filed under
OSS

I was fascinated to read about Software Freedom Day last month, where open source enthusiasts took to the streets around the world to celebrate open software. We've had freedom marches in favour of land rights, troop withdrawal and industrial relations laws, but I never realized proprietary software was in the same category as country invasions and reductions in workers rights.

Fedora Core 6 vs Ubuntu 6.10

Filed under
Linux

I've been using Fedora Core 6 pre-release for a couple of days now, and I'm ready to write about my experience so far. Overall, there are both good and bad things about Fedora. Here are some things that I like about it:

Install Opera Web Browser in Debian Sarge,Etch or Sid in 3 Steps

Filed under
OS
Linux
HowTos

Opera is a full-featured Internet tool, most notably a fully standard conforming Web browser. Opera includes pop-up blocking, tabbed browsing, integrated searches, and advanced functions like a password manager, mouse gestures, native Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) support, an email program, RSS newsfeeds, and IRC chat. It is designed to be fast andhighly customizable.

Read Full article here

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Mirai and Singapore's Massive Breach

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Mirai botnet hackers [sic] avoid jail time by helping FBI

    The three men, Josiah White, 21, Dalton Norman, 22, and Paras Jha, 22, all from the US, managed to avoid the clink by providing "substantial assistance in other complex cybercrime investigations", according to the US Department of Justice. Who'd have thought young hacker [sic] types would roll over and show their bellies when faced with prison time....

  • A healthcare IT foundation built on gooey clay
    Today, there was a report from the Solicitor General of Singapore about the data breach of the SingHealth systems that happened in July. These systems have been in place for many years. They are almost exclusively running Microsoft Windows along with a mix of other proprietary software including Citrix and Allscript. The article referred to above failed to highlight that the compromised “end-user workstation” was a Windows machine. That is the very crucial information that always gets left out in all of these reports of breaches. I have had the privilege of being part of an IT advisory committee for a local hospital since about 2004 (that committee has disbanded a couple of years ago, btw). [...] Part of the reason is because decision makers (then and now) only have experience in dealing with proprietary vendor solutions. Some of it might be the only ones available and the open source world has not created equivalent or better offerings. But where there are possibly good enough or even superior open source offerings, they would never be considered – “Rather go with the devil I know, than the devil I don’t know. After all, this is only a job. When I leave, it is someone else’s problem.” (Yeah, I am paraphrasing many conversations and not only from the healthcare sector). I recall a project that I was involved with – before being a Red Hatter – to create a solution to create a “computer on wheels” solution to help with blood collection. As part of that solution, there was a need to check the particulars of the patient who the nurse was taking samples from. That patient info was stored on some admission system that did not provide a means for remote, API-based query. The vendor of that system wanted tens of thousands of dollars to just allow the query to happen. Daylight robbery. I worked around it – did screen scrapping to extract the relevant information. Healthcare IT providers look at healthcare systems as a cashcow and want to milk it to the fullest extent possible (the end consumer bears the cost in the end). Add that to the dearth of technical IT skills supporting the healthcare providers, you quickly fall into that vendor lock-in scenario where the healthcare systems are at the total mercy of the proprietary vendors.

Recoll – A Full-Text GUI Search Tool for Linux Systems

We wrote on various search tools recently like in 9 Productivity Tools for Linux That Are Worth Your Attention and FSearch, and readers suggested awesome alternatives. Today, we bring you an app that can find text anywhere in your computer in grand style – Recoll. Recoll is an open-source GUI search utility app with an outstanding full-text search capability. You can use it to search for keywords and file names on Linux distros and Windows. It supports most of the document formats and plugins for text extraction. Read more

today's howtos

Linux Foundation for Sale

  • Open Source Summit EU Registration Deadline, Sept. 22, Register Now to Save $150 [Ed: Microsoft is the "DIAMOND" sponsor of this event, the highest sponsorship level! Linux Foundation, or the Zemlin PAC, seems to be more about Microsoft than about Linux.]
  • Building a Secure Ecosystem for Node.js [Ed: Earlier today the Zemlin PAC did this puff piece for Microsoft (a sponsor)]
  • The Human Side of Digital Transformation: 7 Recommendations and 3 Pitfalls [Ed: New Zemlin PAC-sponsored and self-serving puff piece]
    Not so long ago, business leaders repeatedly asked: “What exactly is digital transformation and what will it do for my business?” Today we’re more likely to hear, “How do we chart a course?” Our answer: the path to digital involves more than selecting a cloud application platform. Instead, digital, at its heart, is a human journey. It’s about cultivating a mindset, processes, organization and culture that encourages constant innovation to meet ever-changing customer expectations and business goals. In this two-part blog series we’ll share seven guidelines for getting digital right. Read on for the first three.