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Tuesday, 23 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Reiser4 Updated With Transaction Models, Linux 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 7:28pm
Story Start Experimenting with Tizen Says Mobile Developer Leon Anavi Roy Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 7:22pm
Story P2P File Sharing Software Vuze Receives New WebUI Plugin Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 7:21pm
Story Better Intel "Bay Trail" Support Lands In Coreboot Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 7:14pm
Story GNU Xnee 3.19 ('Lucia') released Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 7:10pm
Story Screenlocker architecture in Plasma Next Roy Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 7:06pm
Story 10 steps to migrate your closed software to open source Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 7:02pm
Story U.S. military UAVs migrate to Linux Roy Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 6:59pm
Story AOC delivers pair of mySmart All-in-One Android PCs Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 6:54pm
Story KernelCare: New no-reboot Linux patching system Rianne Schestowitz 06/05/2014 - 6:44pm

Google to Sell Newspaper Ads

Filed under
Google

Stop the presses! Google extended its advertising model to that most mobile of media, the newspaper. It sounds crazy, especially in light of the reaction to certain advertising moves the search engine made earlier this year. But this latest maneuver just might be more successful.

Cheat Sheet: Open source licences

Filed under
OSS

Open source licences... much of a muchness? Indeed. Let me start by saying, if you happen to think that all open source software is created equal, you are very, very wrong.

Stable kernel 2.6.18.3 released

Filed under
Linux

The 2.6.18.3 stable kernel update has been released. This update is a bit smaller than its predecessors, but there's still a fair number of fixes here, including at least one which is security-related.

More Here.

Enhance Your Mail Server With ASSP (Anti-Spam SMTP Proxy)

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

ASSP stands for Anti-Spam SMTP Proxy. The ASSP server project is an Open Source platform-independent transparent SMTP proxy server that leverages numerous methodologies and technologies to both rigidly and adaptively identify spam. In short ASSP is the most kickass solution that is both free and works great. It reduced spam to an absolute minimum for me.

http://www.howtoforge.com/antispam_smtp_proxy

Ifconfig - dissected and demystified

Filed under
HowTos

ifconfig - the ubiquitous command bundled with any Unix/Linux OS is used to setup any/all the network interfaces such as ethernet, wireless, modem and so on that are connected to your computer. ifconfig command provides a wealth of knowledge to any person who takes the time to look at its output.

Jokosher 0.2 Released

Filed under
Software

The Jokosher team are proud to announce the second pre-release of their simple yet powerful audio studio for the GNOME desktop. The new 0.2 version of the software has been in active development since July, and has packed Jokosher with the core features to perform full audio recording and production on the Linux desktop.

Printing in OpenOffice.org Calc, Part I: Page styles

Filed under
HowTos

Spreadsheets are primarily used online. For this reason, printing them can be challenging even to experienced users. However, OpenOffice.org offers more help than most spreadsheets with printing, starting with the introduction of page styles. In this entry, I'll explain how Calc page styles can help with printing spreadsheets.

Jono Bacon: Practical PHP and MySQL, boo yah

Well, my new book will be published any time now. A sample copy was here when I got back from San Francisco, and it looks schaweeeet.

Adopt a Debian orphan

Filed under
Linux

In the Debian project they refer to packages that no longer have mantainers as orphaned. There are a lot of orphaned packages around, some that are promising or very good. Every good developer is encouraged to pick one and try to push it a bit further. Today I'll talk about one of them; it's Syndigator.

Novell to Samba: We're Not Terminating MS Agreement

Filed under
SUSE

According to statements from Novell, in Joe 'Zonker' Brockmeier's article in Linux.com, they are not repudiating their Microsoft deal. We also learn that Eben Moglen has finished the audit and is in discussions with Novell, and he says this:

Installing XOOPS

Filed under
HowTos

To install XOOPS for the first time, you'll need to have the minimum following server software pre-installed:

* HTTP Server (Apache or IIS) "Note, XOOPS only officially supports Apache"
* PHP 4.1.0 and higher (4.1.1 or higher recommended)
* MySQL Database 3.23.XX

Installing Nvidia Drivers in Etch

Filed under
HowTos

For some time now the Nvidia drivers have been missing from the Debian Etch repositories. Naturally it is possible to use Nvidia's own installer, however I prefer to avoid bypassing the package management system where possible, and you should too. Because I say so, and I am right.

Five things to know when you switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

If you have just installed GNU/Linux on your computer, and have only ever used Windows before, here are five things you need to know to get going rapidly.

Gentoo on PS3 Installation Procedure

Filed under
Gentoo
HowTos

there are several things you need to download before you begin. get a usb mass storage device (formatted as fat32) and make a directory called PS3 and inside PS3 make a directory called otheros. put the kboot.bld and the otheros.self files in otheros. it will also be convenient to burn that live cd, and toss the portage tree and stage 3 on the usb mass storage device. you may also want to burn the cell addon disc...

Chris Tyler's Fedora Linux: The Best Book on FC so far!

Filed under
Reviews

Remember what posted ten weeks ago? Review: Two RHEL4 and FC5 Books, Face To Face. It was about Christopher Negus' and Mark G. Sobell's books. Well, unless you're running RHEL4 or CentOS4, you might as well forget about them. Fedora Core users should consider Chris Tyler's book as their first choice. Obviously for a book issued in October 2006, it is dedicated to FC6 only.

Parsix 0.85 Test 3 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Parsix GNU/Linux 0.85 Test 3 is now out. New in this third test release is the inclusion of GNOME 2.16.1, OpenOffice.org 2.0.4, Firefox 2.0, and fixed a number of bugs. The final release of Parsix 0.85 should be out in early December. Phoronix has some Screenshots of Test 3.

How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way

Filed under
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on SuSE systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Backup and Restore Your Ubuntu System using Sbackup

Filed under
HowTos

Data can be lost in different ways some of them are because of hardware failures,you accidentally delete or overwrite a file. Some data loss occurs as a result of natural disasters and other circumstances beyond your control. Now we will see a easy backup and restore tool called “sbackup”

Howto Bypass Ubuntu Login Screen

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

I think many of you who has installed Ubuntu, must hava encountered a login screen before you actually can use the Ubuntu desktop. However there’s a way to enable automatic login to your desktop and completely bypass the login screen.

Open source start-ups speak out

Filed under
OSS

Entrepreneurs attending a recent forum in Germany showed how they plan to use clever open source products — commercially — to compete with proprietary software companies.

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More in Tux Machines

Raspberry Pi lookalike offers HDMI 2.0 and optional M.2

Geniatech’s “XPI-S905X” is a new Raspberry Pi pseudo clone with a quad -A53 Amlogic S905X plus 2GB RAM, up to 16GB eMMC, 4K-ready HDMI 2.0, LAN, 4x USB, touch-enabled LVDS, and optional M.2. Geniatech, which is known for Qualcomm based SBCs such as the Snapdragon 410 based, 96Boards-like Development Board IV and Snapdragon 820E based Development Board 8, has posted specs for a Raspberry Pi form factor board with a quad -A53, Amlogic S905X with 1/6GHz to 2GHz performance. No pricing is available for the XPI-S905X, which appears to be aimed at the OEM market. Read more

​Linus Torvalds talks about coming back to work on Linux

"'I'm starting the usual merge window activity now," said Torvalds. But it's not going to be kernel development as usual. "We did talk about the fact that now Greg [Kroah-Hartman] has write rights to my kernel tree, and if will be easier to just share the load if we want to, and maybe we'll add another maintainer after further discussion." So, Kroah-Hartman, who runs the stable kernel, will have a say on Linus' cutting-edge kernel. Will someone else get write permission to Torvalds' kernel code tree to help lighten the load? Stay tuned. Read more Also: Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election call for nominations

Mozilla: Firefox 65 Plans and Firefox 63 Analysis

  • Firefox 65 Will Block Tracking Cookies By Default
    Mozilla today released Firefox 63, which includes an experimental option to block third-party tracking cookies, protecting against cross-site tracking. You can test this out today, but Mozilla wants to enable it for everyone by default in Firefox 65.
  • The Path to Enhanced Tracking Protection
    As a leader of Firefox’s product management team, I am often asked how Mozilla decides on which privacy features we will build and launch in Firefox. In this post I’d like to tell you about some key aspects of our process, using our recent Enhanced Tracking Protection functionality as an example.
  • Firefox 63 Lets Users Block Tracking Cookies
    As announced in August, Firefox is changing its approach to addressing tracking on the web. As part of that plan, we signaled our intent to prevent cross-site tracking for all Firefox users and made our initial prototype available for testing. Starting with Firefox 63, all desktop versions of Firefox include an experimental cookie policy that blocks cookies and other site data from third-party tracking resources. This new policy provides protection against cross-site tracking while minimizing site breakage associated with traditional cookie blocking.
  • Firefox 63 – Tricks and Treats!
  • Firefox 63 Released, Red Hat Collaborating with NVIDIA, Virtual Box 6.0 Beta Now Available, ODROID Launching a New Intel-Powered SBC and Richard Stallman Announces the GNU Kind Communication Guidelines
    Firefox 63.0 was released this morning. With this new version, "users can opt to block third-party tracking cookies or block all trackers and create exceptions for trusted sites that don't work correctly with content blocking enabled". In addition, WebExtensions now run in their own process on Linux, and Firefox also now warns if you have multiple windows and tabs open when you quit via the main menu. You can download it from here.
  • Changes to how Mozilla Readability extracts article metadata in Firefox 63
    Mozilla Readability will now extract document metadata from Dublin Core and Open Graph Protocol meta tags instead of trying to guess article titles. Earlier this year, I documented how reader mode in web browsers extract metadata about articles. After learning about the messy state of metadata extraction for reader mode, I sought to improve the extraction logic used in Mozilla Readability. Mozilla Readability was one of the first reader mode parsers and it’s used in Firefox as well as other web browsers.

Security: Cross-Hyperthread Spectre V2 Mitigation Ready For Linux, Targeted vs General-Purpose Security and More

  • Cross-Hyperthread Spectre V2 Mitigation Ready For Linux With STIBP
    On the Spectre front for the recently-started Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel is STIBP support for cross-hyperthread Spectre Variant Two mitigation. Going back to the end of the summer was the patch work for this cross-hyperthread Spectre V2 mitigation with STIBP while now it's being merged to mainline.
  • Targeted vs General purpose security
    There seems to be a lot of questions going around lately about how to best give out simple security advice that is actionable. Goodness knows I’ve talked about this more than I can even remember at this point. The security industry is really bad at giving out actionable advice. It’s common someone will ask what’s good advice. They’ll get a few morsels, them someone will point out whatever corner case makes that advice bad and the conversation will spiral into nonsense where we find ourselves trying to defend someone mostly concerned about cat pictures from being kidnapped by a foreign nation. Eventually whoever asked for help quit listening a long time ago and decided to just keep their passwords written on a sticky note under the keyboard. I’m pretty sure the fundamental flaw in all this thinking is we never differentiate between a targeted attack and general purpose security. They are not the same thing. They’re incredibly different in fact. General purpose advice can be reasonable, simple, and good. If you are a target you’ve already lost, most advice won’t help you. General purpose security is just basic hygiene. These are the really easy concepts. Ideas like using a password manager, multi-factor-auth, install updates on your system. These are the activities anyone and everyone should be doing. One could argue these should be the default settings for any given computer or service (that’s a post for another day though). You don’t need to be a security genius to take these steps. You just have to restrain yourself from acting like a crazy person so whoever asked for help can actually get the advice they need.
  • Oracle Moves to Gen 2 Cloud, Promising More Automation and Security [Ed: Ellison wants people to blindly trust proprietary blobs for security (a bad thing to do, never mind the CIA past of Oracle and severe flaws in its DBs)].
    A primary message from Ellison is that the Gen 2 Oracle cloud is more secure, with autonomous capabilities to help protect against attacks. Ellison also emphasized the segmentation and isolation of workloads on the Gen 2 Oracle cloud, providing improved security.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #182
    Here’s what happened in the Reproducible Builds effort between Sunday October 14 and Saturday October 20 2018...