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Thursday, 18 Dec 14 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Overview of Qt3D 2.0 – Part 1 Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 6:04pm
Story Top 10 open source projects of 2014 Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 5:14pm
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 7.0 - a desktop Debian distribution Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:58pm
Story Best Xfce distro of 2014 Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:56pm
Story Android Headliner: More Than A Year Later The Chromecast Is Still Number One For Streaming Media Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:29pm
Story Kali Linux review Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:18pm
Story Debian vs Ubuntu: How Far Has Ubuntu Come in 10 Years? Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:12pm
Story Ubuntu 15.04 to Include GNOME 3.14, Updates to Default Apps Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:09pm
Story Fedora 21 Review: Conveys a Fantastic ‘GNOME Classic’ Experience Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:05pm
Story 2015 will be the year Linux takes over the enterprise (and other predictions) Roy Schestowitz 16/12/2014 - 4:03pm

5tFTW: Five Fedora 21 FAQs

Filed under
Red Hat

After Tuesday’s awesomely successful launch of Fedora 21, this Five Things in Fedora This Week covers a few questions that I’ve been asked a lot, by the press and by users who haven’t been following Fedora development closely. I hope this will clear up some of the concerns, and as always I’m happy to discuss further in comments, email, IRC, social media, or in person.

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A Third Party Developer Has Created An Awesome Radial Bottom Edge Menu For Ubuntu Touch

Filed under
Ubuntu

Nekhelesh Ramananthan, a third party developer has created a very beautiful Radial Bottom Edge Menu for Ubuntu Touch, which impressed even the Canonical developers.

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Calligra 2.9 Beta Released

Filed under
KDE
Software

We’re pleased to present you the first beta release in 2.9 series of Calligra Suite for testing! We will focus on fixing issues including those that you’d report. All thus to make the final release of 2.9 expected in January 2015 as stable as possible!

When you update many improvements and a few new features will be installed, mostly in Kexi and Krita as well as general ones. Finally in 2.9 a new app, Calligra Gemini, appears. Read below to see why it may be of interest to you.

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Open or Fauxpen? Use the OSS Watch Openness Rating tool to find out

Filed under
OSS

This is the question that OSS Watch, in partnership with Pia Waugh, developed the Openness Rating to help you find out.

Using a series of questions covering legal issues, governance, standards, knowledge sharing and market access, the tool helps you to identify potential problem areas for users, contributors and partners.

Unlike earlier models designed to evaluate open source projects, this model can also be applied to both open and closed source software products.

We’ve used the Openness Rating internally at OSS Watch for several years as a key part of our consultancy work, but this is the first time we’ve made the app itself open for anyone to use. It requires a fair bit of knowledge to get the most out of it, but even at a basic level its useful for highlighting questions that a project needs to be able to answer.

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How to install Fedora: Hands-on with Anaconda installer

Filed under
Red Hat
HowTos

Fedora 21 was released this week and it looks like a great release so far, but one area where Fedora can be challenging for a new user is installation. Fedora developers decided to move away from the time-tested wizard-like installer where the user takes various steps in linear order ensuring none of the important steps is missed, instead adopting the hub & spoke model.

While I appreciate the good intentions of UX designers and developers there are a couple of flaws in the installer that make the whole process a bit, I would say, complicated.

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Highest Performance ARM Desktop Ever

Filed under
GNU
Linux

That’s the claim CompuLab (the folks who gave us TrimSlice) makes about their Utilite2 device. I think they are very close to being truthful. Performance is not just about the network, the CPU, the graphics, and RAM. It’s about how it all works together. TrimSlice has a winner every way except in RAM. These days, 2gB is limiting, even for browsing the web. Modern browsers like FireFox and Chrome cache so much stuff and Chrome preloads pages that a user might click, that the browser takes all available RAM and performance drops off in 2gB. On my system, with 4gB RAM and hundreds of processes, Chrome is taking gigabytes of virtual memory and sometimes causes swapping if I have a dozen pages open.

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MIPS Has An "Unusually Large Pull" For Linux 3.19 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

The MIPS architecture improvements and new features for the Linux 3.19 kernel are aplenty due to many MIPS patches not being merged for Linux 3.18 and then aside from that a lot of developers sending in lots of new work.

Among the MIPS changes for Linux 3.19 are:

- Debug improvements like better backtraces on SMP systems and improving the backtrace code used by oprofile.

- Octeon platform code clean-ups.

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The Backed Pack: An open source platform, sensor & tablet

Filed under
OSS

Mono is an open source, programmable platform designed to test ideas out on. The tiny device comes equipped with a 2.2″ TFT touch display, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, an accelerometer, and a temperature sensor. Mono is a gadget as much as it is a development platform. As such, it can act as an interface for other custom ideas, or act on its own. By downloading tailored apps from the MonoKiosk app store, Mono can act as a one-touch light for Phillips Hue connected bulbs, or can display weather forecasts, for example.

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How And Why The World Is Trending Towards Open Source

Filed under
OSS

So, what is the big deal with open source software? Besides the fact that it’s free, and it gives you all of the freedoms without all of the licensing restrictions. The business agility open source offers is quickly eroding the main stream. In a 2013 survey with over 800 participants from both vendor and non-vendor communities it was reported that open source software has matured to such an extent that it now influences everything from innovation to collaboration among competitors to hiring practices.

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New Features Proposed For Fedora 22

Filed under
Red Hat

Beyond the potential feature of Fedora's X.Org input stack using libinput, there's been several other features proposed for the next Fedora Linux release.

Among the proposed Fedora 22 changes that have to still be approved by the Fedora Engineering and Steering Committee (FESCo) include:

- Upgrading to Ruby on Rails 4.2 but that might even change to be a request for Ruby on Rails 5.

- The ability to provide UEFI Secure Boot Blacklist Updates.

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Using encryption on Android – A rant

Filed under
Android
Security

Not every email client for Android out there supports encryption; and when it does, it does not work like Enigmail: you must first install the email client, set it up; then install an app that enables the use of GPG (APG or GnuPG for Android); then you have supposedly and through a reasonably secure process sent your full GPG keys to your phone (SD card or the internal memory).

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Krita 2.9: First Beta Released!

Filed under
KDE

Last week, the first preparations for the next Krita release started with the creation of the first Krita 2.9 beta release: Krita 2.9 Beta 1. This means that we’ve stopped adding new features to the codebase, and are now focusing on making Krita 2.9 as stable as possible.

We’ve come a long way since March, when we released Krita 2.8! Thanks to the enthusiastic support of many, many users, here and on kickstarter, Krita 2.9 has a huge set of cool new features, improvements and refinements.

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Mesa 10.4.0 released

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Mesa 10.4.0 has been released! Mesa 10.4.0 is a feature release that
includes many updates and enhancements. The full list is available in
the release notes file in docs/relnotes/10.4.html.

The tag in the GIT repository for Mesa 10.4.0 is 'mesa-10.4.0'. I have
verified that the tag is in the correct place in the tree.

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Tanglu 2 (Bartholomea annulata) released!

Filed under
GNU
Linux

We are glad to announce the availability of the second release of Tanglu, codename "Bartholomea".

This release contains a large amount of updated packages, and ships with the latest release of KDE 4 and GNOME.

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Unity 8 for Ubuntu 15.04 Is Showing Great Progress

Filed under
Ubuntu

Unity 8 for the Ubuntu desktop is still pretty far from being ready for day-to-day use, but the devs have been making some great progress and it looks like the desktop experience is shaping up.

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Debian 8.0 Jessie - GNU/Linux vs. GNU/kFreeBSD Benchmarks

Filed under
Debian

Here's our latest benchmark results comparing the performance of Debian Jessie GNU/Linux vs. GNU/kFreeBSD -- the Debian port that uses the FreeBSD kernel rather than Linux.

The Debian GNU/kFreeBSD port is now shipping with the FreeBSD 10.1 kernel by default and aside from that has most of the standard GNU utilities and user-land supported by Debian GNU/Linux. GCC 4.9.1 is the default compiler and UFS is the default file-system for GNU/kFreeBSD.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Leftovers: Screenshots

Filed under
Reviews

Crowdfunding a USB-stick-sized, GNU/Linux-ready computer

Filed under
Linux

A reader writes, "The USB Armory is full-blown computer (800MHz ARM® processor, 512MB RAM) in a tiny form factor (65mm x 19mm x 6mm USB stick) designed from the ground up with information security applications in mind."

"Not only does the USB Armory have native support for many Linux distributions, it also has a completely open hardware design and a breakout prototyping header, making it a great platform on which to build other hardware."

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