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Saturday, 23 Mar 19 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Graphics: Libinput 1.13 RC2, NVIDIA and AMD Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 6:06am
Story Events: Red Hat Summit 2019, SUSECON Featuring Microsoft, and LibrePlanet About to Start Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 4:31am
Story Release of HardenedBSD 1200058.4 and BSD Now 290 Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 4:26am
Story Announcing CrossOver 18.5.0 and Games for GNU/Linux Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 4:07am
Story PHP and Python Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 4:01am
Story Solus 4 Fortitude Released Rianne Schestowitz 8 22/03/2019 - 3:47am
Story Availability of GNOME 3.32 on GNU/Linux Distros Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 3:41am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/03/2019 - 3:39am
Story RaspEX Project Brings Kodi 18.1 and Linux Kernel 5.0 to Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2019 - 11:51pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/03/2019 - 7:58pm

Security: Updates, Microsoft, Mirai, Reproducible Builds and PuTTY

Filed under
Security

KDE neon 5.15 review - Speed bumps ahead

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

KDE neon 5.15 is a decent distro. But it's not quite as pain-free as some of its predecessors, and I've hit a bunch of highly disappointing errors and bugs that simply shouldn't be there. The network and phone experience needs to be better, smoother. There ought to be no crashes. Regressions are bad.

Then, the upgrade process is robust and tight, the system is beautiful, and it purrs like a tiger - do tigers purr actually? You get the idea. Very sleek, very slick. Fast. You have a wealth of great software and a well-designed desktop environment that blends the bleeding-edge with pro-thought and good speed, and without being utterly beta. I'm quite happy overall, but I don't like the lack of consistency between the live media and the installed system. Some of this feels rushed. A good release, but ultimately not calm enough for everyday use. Well, I guess that's what LTS is for. 7/10. That would be all for today.

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More GNOME Shell / Mutter Performance Optimizations & Latency Reductions Still Coming

Filed under
GNOME

Over the course of the GNOME 3.32 that is nearly complete as well as GNOME 3.30 there was a lot of measurable performance fixes and enhancements to improve the fluidity of the GNOME desktop as well as addressing various latency issues. While in some areas these performance improvements make a night and day difference, work isn't done on enhancing GNOME's performance.

One of the developers leading the charge on enhancing/fixing the performance of GNOME Shell and Mutter in particular has been Canonical's Daniel Van Vugt. While he's already made great strides in fixing issues himself, reviewing and collaborating on other patches, etc, the job isn't done. Van Vugt shared there's still some big ticket work pending.

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DataPractices.org Becomes a Linux Foundation Project

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced DataPractices.org, the first-ever template for data best practices, will now be a hosted project under the Linux Foundation and offer open courseware for data teamwork.

Datapractices.org was initially pioneered by data.world as a “Manifesto for Data Practices,” comprised of values and principles to illustrate the most effective, modern, and ethical approach to data teamwork. As an open project under the Linux Foundation, Datapractices.org intends to maintain and further develop a collaborative approach to defining and refining data best practices. The project will also facilitate collaboration and development of open courseware to guide organizations interested in aligning their data practices with the values (inclusion, experimentation, accountability, and impact) and principles of DataPractices.org.

As a part of the Linux Foundation, DataPractices.org intends to enable a vendor-neutral community to further establish best practices and increase the level of data knowledge across the data ecosystem. The project’s new open courseware is available to anyone interested in data best practices—including novice practitioners, data managers, corporate evangelists, seasoned data scientists, and more. The project also welcomes expert practitioners to help refine and advance the courseware.

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Pop OS 18.10 Linux Gaming Report: System76 Nails It For Nvidia And AMD Users

Filed under
OS
Gaming

Pop!_OS is, in my opinion, a seriously underappreciated Ubuntu-based operating that distinguishes itself in a couple major areas -- in addition to its utter simplicity and slick installer. It was created primarily to be the accompanying OS for the variety of custom Linux desktops and laptops produced by System76, and they've added some features I prefer not to live without regardless of what hardware I'm using.

First, Pop!_OS is one of the only distros I've tried that elegantly handles Hybrid graphics (that's Intel CPU + Nvidia GPU as seen in laptops like the ThinkPad X1 Extreme) out of the box. Moreover, System76 ships two versions of Pop!_OS: one designed for Intel/AMD, and one designed for Nvidia GPUs. The Nvidia ISO installs the proprietary driver so that users don't need to add a repository by hand and install it later.

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Tor-Powered Tails 3.13 Anonymous Linux OS Adds Extra Security and Latest Updates

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Security
Debian

Powered by the Linux 4.19.28 kernel, the Tails 3.13 operating system is now available with latest TOR technologies to help you stay hidden while surfing the Internet, including the Tor Browser 8.0.7 anonymous web browser and Tor 0.3.5.8 client and server for the anonymous Tor network.

However, probably the most important addition in the Tails 3.13 release is the updated Intel microcode to version 3.20180807a.2, which adds an extra security measure against more variants of the well-known Spectre, Meltdown, and L1TF (Level 1 Terminal Fault) security vulnerabilities.

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NetworkManager 1.16 Released with WPA3-Personal and WireGuard VPN Support, More

Filed under
OSS

NetworkManager 1.16 has been released two days after the launch of the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment and promises lots of exciting new features and improvements, starting with support for the new WireGuard protocol implemented in the Linux kernel for creating secure IPv4 and IPv6 VPNs (Virtual Private Networks).

"Unlike other VPN solutions NetworkManager supports, WireGuard tunneling will be entirely handled by the Linux kernel. This has an advantages in terms of performance, and also removes the needs of a VPN plugin," explained developer Lubomir Rintel in a recent blog article.

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What’s New in ArcoLinux 19.2 and MakuluLinux Core

Filed under
GNU
Linux

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Linux Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week NVIDIA announced the GeForce GTX 1660 as the newest RTX-less Turing GPU but costing only $219+ USD. The GTX 1660 is a further trimmed down version of the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti that launched several weeks prior. After picking up an ASUS GeForce GTX 1660 Phoenix Edition, here are Linux OpenGL/Vulkan gaming benchmarks compared to a wide assortment of AMD Radeon and NVIDIA GeForce graphics cards under Ubuntu.

The GeForce GTX 1660 features 1408 CUDA cores (compared to 1536 with the GTX 1660 Ti) while having a 1785MHz boost clock frequency and 1530MHz base clock frequency. The GeForce GTX 1660 opts for 6GB of GDDR5 unlike the 6GB GDDR6 used by the GTX 1660 Ti, which means only around 192GB/s of video memory bandwidth compared to 288GB/s with the Ti model. The other specifications are largely in common with the GeForce GTX 1660 Ti and the other Turing GPUs aside from lacking the RT/tensor cores.

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Handling Complex Memory Situations

Filed under
Linux

Jérôme Glisse felt that the time had come for the Linux kernel to address seriously the issue of having many different types of memory installed on a single running system. There was main system memory and device-specific memory, and associated hierarchies regarding which memory to use at which time and under which circumstances. This complicated new situation, Jérôme said, was actually now the norm, and it should be treated as such.

The physical connections between the various CPUs and devices and RAM chips—that is, the bus topology—also was relevant, because it could influence the various speeds of each of those components.

Jérôme wanted to be clear that his proposal went beyond existing efforts to handle heterogeneous RAM. He wanted to take account of the wide range of hardware and its topological relationships to eek out the absolute highest performance from a given system.

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From/on the Linux Foundation:

  • Sysdig Joins the Linux Foundation's New Foundation to Support Continuous Delivery Collaboration
  • Linux Foundation Launches Red Team Project

    The Linux Foundation has launched a new project aimed at incubating open source cybersecurity tools. The Red Team Project's main goal is to make open source software safer to use.

    The aim is to create cybersecurity tools for areas including cyber range automation, containerized pentesting utilities, binary risk quantification, and standards validation and advancement.

    [...]

    Current tooling from the project start with a Linux Exploit Mapper (LEM) that scans a Linux system for local exploits and maps them to known exploit code. When exploits are discovered using the mapper, they are curated, tested for efficacy and ease-of-use using a variant of the STRIDE scoring mechanism. An Ansible role called cyber-range-target is used to deliberately downgrade OS packages to a version vulnerable to a given CVE (Common Vulnerabilities and Exposure) for assessment purposes. The project also provides a Red Container. This offers containerized pentesting tooling, which can be launched from whole OSes or containerized environments like Kubernetes.

Some Quick Graphics/Game Tests With GNOME 3.32 On Clear Linux

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
GNOME
Gaming

For about one week already Intel's rolling-release Clear Linux distribution has been shipping with GNOME 3.32. Here are some quick graphics and gaming benchmarks comparing GNOME 3.30.2 to 3.32.0.

Using a Radeon RX Vega 56 graphics card, I tested Clear Linux between its releases having GNOME Shell 3.30 and the move to GNOME Shell 3.30.2. On both builds of Clear Linux, Linux 5.0.1 was in use along with X.Org Server 1.20.4 (they aren't yet defaulting to a Wayland session), and Mesa 19.1-devel.

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LLVM 8.0.0 Released

Filed under
Development
BSD
  • LLVM 8.0.0 released

    I'm pleased to announce that LLVM 8 is now available.

    Get it here: https://llvm.org/releases/download.html#8.0.0

    This release contains the work on trunk up to Subversion revision
    r351319, plus work on the release branch. It's the result of the LLVM
    community's work over the past six months, including: speculative load
    hardening, concurrent compilation in the ORC JIT API, no longer
    experimental WebAssembly target, a Clang option to initialize
    automatic variables, improved pre-compiled header support in clang-cl,
    the /Zc:dllexportInlines- flag, RISC-V support in lld. And as usual,
    many bug fixes, optimization and diagnostics improvements, etc.

    For more details, see the release notes:
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/docs/ReleaseNotes.html
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/tools/clang/docs/ReleaseN...
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/tools/clang/tools/extra/d...
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/tools/lld/docs/ReleaseNot...
    https://llvm.org/releases/8.0.0/projects/libcxx/docs/Rele...

    Special thanks to the release testers and packagers: Amy Kwan, Bero
    Rosenkränzer, Brian Cain, Diana Picus, Dimitry Andric, Kim Gräsman,
    Lei Huang, Michał Górny, Sylvestre Ledru, Ulrich Weigand, Vedant
    Kumar, and Yvan Roux.

    For questions or comments about the release, please contact the
    community on the mailing lists. Onwards to LLVM 9!

    Thanks,
    Hans

  • LLVM 8.0.0 released

    Version 8.0.0 of the LLVM compiler suite is out. "It's the result of the LLVM community's work over the past six months, including: speculative load hardening, concurrent compilation in the ORC JIT API, no longer experimental WebAssembly target, a Clang option to initialize automatic variables, improved pre-compiled header support in clang-cl, the /Zc:dllexportInlines- flag, RISC-V support in lld." For details one can see separate release notes for LLVM, Clang, Extra Clang Tools, lld, and libc++.

  • LLVM 8.0 Released With Cascade Lake Support, Better Diagnostics, More OpenMP/OpenCL

    After being delayed the better part of one month, LLVM 8.0 officially set sail this morning.

Games: Stadia, System Shock and Wizard of Legend

Filed under
Gaming

Software: Curl, Messaging Software, Terminal Software and Shallot for File Management

Filed under
Software
  • Daniel Stenberg: Happy 21st, curl!

    Another year has passed. The curl project is now 21 years old.

    I think we can now say that it is a grown-up in most aspects. What have we accomplished in the project in these 21 years?

    We’ve done 179 releases. Number 180 is just a week away.

    We estimate that there are now roughly 6 billion curl installations world-wide. In phones, computers, TVs, cars, video games etc. With 4 billion internet users, that’s like 1.5 curl installation per Internet connected human on earth

    669 persons have authored patches that was merged.

  • Choosing an open messenger client: Alternatives to WhatsApp

    Like many families, mine is inconveniently spread around, and I have many colleagues in North and South America. So, over the years, I've relied more and more on WhatsApp to stay in touch with people. The claimed end-to-end encryption appeals to me, as I prefer to maintain some shreds of privacy, and moreover to avoid forcing those with whom I communicate to use an insecure mechanism.

  • 4 cool terminal multiplexers

    The Fedora OS is comfortable and easy for lots of users. It has a stunning desktop that makes it easy to get everyday tasks done. Under the hood is all the power of a Linux system, and the terminal is the easiest way for power users to harness it. By default terminals are simple and somewhat limited. However, a terminal multiplexer allows you to turn your terminal into an even more incredible powerhouse. This article shows off some popular terminal multiplexers and how to install them.

    Why would you want to use one? Well, for one thing, it lets you logout of your system while leaving your terminal session undisturbed. It’s incredibly useful to logout of your console, secure it, travel somewhere else, then remotely login with SSH and continue where you left off. Here are some utilities to check out.

    One of the oldest and most well-known terminal multiplexers is screen. However, because the code is no longer maintained, this article focuses on more recent apps. (“Recent” is relative — some of these have been around for years!)

  • Shallot – Qt-based file manager with plugin interface

    We recently published a comprehensive roundup of the best 15 Qt file managers, finally plumping on Krusader and Dolphin as our recommended tools to manage your file system.

    A few of our readers have emailed us requesting we take a spin of Shallot. Never one to disappoint, here’s our take on this file manager. It’s Qt-based with a plugin interface. We compare Shallot with the 15 Qt file managers.

    Shallot is billed as a file manager with the maximum degree of flexibility and customizability.

Games: More on Stadia, OpenXR, Albion Online

Filed under
Gaming
  • Stadia, A Gaming Platform From Google

    Google has launched much-anticipated game streaming service Stadia. The announcement was made during the company’s keynote at the GDC (Game Developers Conference) in San Francisco.

  • Vulkan 1.1.105 Adds New Extensions For Google Games Platform (Stadia)

    While Vulkan 1.1.104 was just released on Sunday with new extensions ahead of this week's Game Developers Conference, today marks the availability of Vulkan 1.1.105 with new extensions for the "Google Games Platform", a.k.a. their just announced Stadia cloud game streaming platform.

    Google Games Platform is a new Vulkan platform and dubbed GGP. This Vulkan update comes immediately following Google announcing Stadia as a Linux/Vulkan-powered game streaming platform that sounds quite interesting and will be interesting to learn more over the weeks ahead. Today's Vulkan 1.1.105 update has added the VK_GGP_frame_token and VK_GGP_stream_descriptor_surface extensions.

  • OpenXR from The Khronos Group and Monado from Collabora could unify VR & AR

    The Khronos Group recently announced a provisional specification of OpenXR, a royalty-free open-standard aimed at unifying access to VR and AR (collectively known as XR) devices. Also, Collabora announced Monado, a fully open source OpenXR runtime for Linux.

    [...]

    Sounds like OpenXR is already gaining pretty good industry support too with Epic Games, Microsoft, Oculus, HTC, Tobii, Unity and more giving their backing to it. Hopefully this means it really will become a standard that's actually used preventing more fragmentation. Since no one headset has truly taken over just yet, with so many already throwing their support around for OpenXR it's looking pretty good.

  • The MMO Albion Online is officially going free to play next month

    Sandbox Interactive just announced that their MMO Albion Online, which currently requires an initial purchase to access it is going free to play on April 10th.

    They say their business model isn't changing, with Premium accounts that can be purchased with in-game money or real money, as well as cosmetic items. Free accounts will have full access to everything, since they don't lock any actual content behind any walls with this free to play release.

Security: Elsevier Left Users’ Passwords Exposed Online and Norsk Hydro of Norway Got Windows Cracked

Filed under
Security
  • Education and Science Giant Elsevier Left Users’ Passwords Exposed Online

    It’s not entirely clear how long the server was exposed or how many accounts were impacted, but it provided a rolling list of passwords as well as password reset links when a user requested to change their login credentials.

  • Norwegian aluminium firm goes manual after Windows ransomware attack

    Norwegian aluminium maker Norsk Hydro has been under what it describes as "an extensive cyber attack" that has affected several areas of the company's operations. The malware affecting the firm is believed to the LockerGoga ransomware that attacks Windows systems.

  • “Severe” ransomware attack cripples big aluminum producer

    Norsk Hydro of Norway said the malware first hit computers in the United States on Monday night. By Tuesday morning, the infection had spread to other parts of the company, which operates in 40 countries. Company officials responded by isolating plants to prevent further spreading. Some plants were temporarily stopped, while others, which had to be kept running continuously, were switched to manual mode when possible. The company’s 35,000 employees were instructed to keep computers turned off but were allowed to use phones and tablets to check email.

GnuPG 2.2.14 and Kiwi TCMS 6.6

Filed under
Software
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More in Tux Machines

Events: SREcon19 Americas, Scale, FudCon and Snapcraft Summit Montreal

  • SREcon19 Americas Talk Resources
    At SREcon19 Americas, I gave a talk called "Operating within Normal Parameters: Monitoring Kubernetes". Here's some links and resources related to my talk, for your reference.
  • Participating at #Scale17x
    Everytime somebody asks me about Scale I can only think of the same: Scale is the most important community lead conference in North America and it only gets better by the years. This year it celebrated its seventeenth edition and it just struck me: with me being there this year, there have been more Scales I have attended than I have not. This is my nineth conference out of 17. The first time that I attended it was 2011, it was the edition followed by FudCon Tempe 2010 which happened to be my first Fedora conference and it was also the first time I got to meet some contributors that I had previously collaborated with, many of which I still consider my brothers. As for this time, I almost didn’t make it as my visa renewal was resolved on Friday’s noon, one day after the conference started. I recovered it that same day and book a flight in the night. I couldn’t find anything to LAX -as I regularly fly- so I had to fly to Tijuana and from there I borrowed a cart to Pasadena. Long story short: I arrived around 1:30 AM on Saturday.
  • Snapcraft Summit Montreal
    Snapcraft is the universal app store for Linux that reaches millions of users and devices and serves millions of app installs a month. The Snapcraft Summit is a forward-thinking software workshop attended by major software vendors, community contributors and Snapcraft engineers working at every level of the stack.

today's howtos

Draw On Your Screen with this Neat GNOME Shell Extension

Ever wish you could draw on the Linux desktop or write on the screen? Well, there’s a new GNOME Shell extension that lets you do exactly that: draw on the Linux desktop. You may want to point out a bug, highlight a feature, or provide some guidance to someone else by sending them an annotated screenshot. In this short post we’ll show you how to install the add-on and how to use it. Read more

Fedora 31 Preparing To Start Removing Packages Depending Upon Python 2

Python 2 support will formally reach end-of-life on 1 January 2020 and Fedora 31 is preparing for that by working to drop packages (or parts of packages) that depend upon Python 2. Fedora has been pushing for a Python 2 to Python 3 migration for many cycles now -- as most Linux distributions have -- while with Fedora 31 they are planning a "mass Python 2 package removal" if necessary. They are planning to closely track the state of packages depending upon Python 2 to either drop the packages or allow packagers to easily abandon Python 2 parts of programs. Read more