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Monday, 24 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:46pm
Story Qt, KDE, and GNOME GUADEC in Manchester Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:44pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:40pm
Story Preparations for Debian-based Tails 3.0 and Ubuntu 17.10 Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:39pm
Story Tizen and Android Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:36pm
Story Leftovers: OSS and Sharing Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:36pm
Story Tor Browser and Firefox Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:33pm
Story Black Duck Spreading FUD Against FOSS Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:32pm
Story Security Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 10:30pm
Story Enlightenment's EFL and Elive Roy Schestowitz 21/04/2017 - 9:40pm

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

Wine Releases

Filed under
Software

Compilers: Not Just GNU

Filed under
Development
  • Psychec: A Type Inference Engine For C, The C Language Meets Unification

    Here, at the Compiler's Laboratory of UFMG, we've been trying to understand the meaning of incomplete C code. How well can a parser reason about a source when declarations (or complete headers) are missing? In the C language, challenges appear already during parsing, since, not only syntax, but also semantic information (possibly absent) is required. Yet, the really cool challenges emerge when we want to reconstruct a partial program into a complete one that passes the type-checker.

  • GCC 7 Has Been Branched, GCC 8.0 Now On Master

    The GCC 7 mainline code-base hit the important milestone today of having zero P1 regressions -- issues of the highest priority -- and as such they branched the GCC7 code-base and GCC 7.1 RC1 is then being announced later this week as they prepare for this first stable release of GCC 7.

Future of Ubuntu Server and Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Server Team Begins Planning For 17.10

    Following the successful launch of Ubuntu 17.04, the Ubuntu Server team is beginning to formalize their plans for Ubuntu 17.10.

    Development on Ubuntu 17.10 "AA" has yet to officially begin with Mark Shuttleworth not yet announcing the codename. I've heard a yet to be substantiated comment from a fellow that part of the reason AA isn't yet open for development is they are weighing possible internal development changes, perhaps even making Ubuntu rolling-release-like, but not quite rolling like Arch or Gentoo, following the turnover and other changes going on at Canonical. Anyhow, the server team is moving ahead in trying to plan some of their work for the "AA" cycle.

  • Ubuntu 17.10 Is Artful

    According to Launchpad, it looks like we finally have the codename for the successor to the Zesty Zapus.

    Artful Aardvark is registered on Launchpad as the Ubuntu release to be delivered in October 2017. We have yet to see Mark Shuttleworth comment on his blog about it, but there is also now the artful archive.

  • Mir Developers See The Door, No Commits In A Week

System76 System76

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Entering Phase Three

    Phase three moves product design and manufacturing in house. We’re about to build the Model S of computers. Something so brilliant and beautiful that reviewers will have to add an 11 to their scores. Being that we’re System76 and we do things the System76 way, our design principles are polar opposite of the rest of the industry.

  • System76 To Begin Their Own Product Design & Manufacturing

    In looking to make their Linux-powered systems more appealing and original to the masses, System76 will begin their own product design and manufacturing.

    First beginning with desktop computers and laptops further down the road, this system provider of Ubuntu-powered systems will begin their own original product designs.

  • System76 to design and manufacture their desktop PCs in-house

Building a Wearable Device with Zephyr

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation’s open source Zephyr Project received considerable attention at this February’s Embedded Linux Conference (ELC). Although there are still no shipping products running this lightweight real-time operating system (RTOS) for microcontrollers, Fabien Parent and Neil Armstrong of the French embedded firm BayLibre shared their experiences in developing a wearable device that may end up being the first Zephyr-based consumer electronics product.

BayLibre’s device has an ARM Cortex-A SoC connected via an SPI bus to a Cortex-M4 STM32L4xx. This is linked via I2C to other, more lightweight Cortex-M cores. Parent and Armstrong could say no more about the design, but they explained why they chose Zephyr and discussed the project’s pros and cons.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu-friendly Qseven COM runs on Apollo Lake

Red Hat Offers Launchpad for IT Transformation with Latest Version of Red Hat Virtualization

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the general availability of Red Hat Virtualization 4.1, the latest release of the company’s Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)-powered enterprise virtualization platform. Providing an open source infrastructure and centralized management solution for virtualized servers and workstations and built on the enterprise-grade backbone of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Virtualization 4.1 delivers expanded automation capabilities through integration with Ansible by Red Hat while new networking and storage capabilities offer a stable, flexible foundation for IT innovation.

Read more

Low Power Wireless: 6LoWPAN, IEEE802.15.4 and the Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

The Internet of Things (IoT) is one of the new kids on the block. It promises connection of sensors and actuators to the internet, for data to flow both ways, and once on the internet, to become part of new and exciting business systems, reaching up into the realms of big data and artificial intelligence.

IoT applications will rely on a large and complex system. One of the components in this will be the connections between sensors and actuators and the internet. This will most likely be wireless, and it will have to be low power. If you have a thousand sensors, they will most likely be running off batteries, and you will want those batteries to last years, not days.

Read more

The 5 best Linux laptops of 2017

Filed under
Linux

There was a time when Linux was seen as an outcast operating system, and indeed one that was labelled as a ‘cancer’ by Microsoft’s former CEO Steve Ballmer.

Times have now changed as the 25-year-old operating system has made some serious inroads in the server market, then in the cloud – not forgetting that it underpins the most popular ecosystem out there: Android.

Read more

Consider Linux as Your Go-To Operating System

Filed under
Linux

Linux. You have probably heard about this operating system over the years, but what is it really? What can you do with it? How do you get a copy?

Well, the answers are easier than you can possibly imagine.

Linux is a computer operating system that has been embraced by vendors, including Telos, Wheatstone and Orban. This operating system can be used to run almost any computerized hardware. It is used on phones, tablets, microphone processors, AoIP controllers and even your microwave oven.

Read more

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • If Only Thunderbird Did Look Like This…

    If Thunderbird looked like the design you see above would there be any question on whether Ubuntu should drop it from the default install? I think not.

  • Ubuntu might retire Thunderbird

    The open saucy Ubuntu is considering dumping the Thunderbird mail app because users tend to favour using webservices mail instead.

    Ubuntu 17.10 may not include a default desktop email app at all and Thunderbird is Ubuntu’s default email app at the moment.

  • Firefox 53 Released With 2 New Compact Themes

    Mozilla Firefox 53 has been released, and is now available to download right now. The latest release of the popular open-source web-browser ships with two new compact themes, reader mode improvements, and updated site permission requests.

  • This April, Mozilla is Standing Up for Science

    We believe openness is a core component not just of a healthy Internet, but also a healthy society. Much like open practices can unlock innovation in the realm of technology, open practices can also invigorate fields like civics, journalism — and science.

    In laboratories and at academic institutions, open source code, data and methodology foster collaboration between researchers; spark scientific progress; increase transparency and encourage reproducibility; and better serve the public interest.

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • The Past, Present and Future of Canonical and Ubuntu Linux

    From a rethinking of mobile strategy to a change in the CEO office, big changes are afoot at Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu Linux. Here's what they could mean for the future of the open source company and the software it produces.

    As regular readers of The VAR Guy (which at one time had an entire sister site devoted to Ubuntu) know, Canonical is a relatively major company in the open source space.

    Founded in 2004, Canonical is not as old or as big as competitors like Red Hat. The latter is a publicly traded company founded in the heady days of the late 1990s, when the dot com world was bubbling over and Linus Torvalds was considered the fifteenth-most important person of the twentieth century.

  • A Look at Desktop Environments: UNITY

    Unity, probably the most universally debated DE in the GNU/Linux community; despised by some, yet absolutely loved by others. Unity was created by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, for Ubuntu. It’s possible to install Unity on other systems, but 99% of the users you see using Unity are running it with Ubuntu.

  • Upgrade Ubuntu 16.10 to Ubuntu 17.04. Your swap partition will be retained

    If you’re using a computer with Ubuntu 16.10 Desktop installed, chances are that you’ve already been prompted to upgrade to the latest version, which is Ubuntu 17.04 Desktop. It’s a simple and painless process that takes just a few hours.

Review On Ubuntu Budgie 17.04: Newest Ubuntu Flavor

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Budgie is a new desktop interface built from scratch which focuses on simplicity and elegance. It is developed by the Solus team. It uses GNOME technologies beside their own modifications to give a better user experience.

Ubuntu Budgie is an Ubuntu-based distribution which uses Budgie desktop interface as its default. It’s an official Ubuntu flavor. Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 was the first release of this distribution, which was released 3 days ago.

We downloaded the new distribution and played with it for a while to see what it has. This was our experience. TL;DR: Generally so good, nothing so special to see, but there are some small glitches.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Budgie 17.04 review

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Join us at Red Hat Summit 2017

    As you’ve probably heard, this year’s Red Hat Summit is in Boston May 2-4. Product Security is looking forward to taking over multiple sessions and activities over the course of those 3 days, and we wanted to give you a sneak peek of what we have planned.

  • Red Hat Offers Launchpad for IT Transformation with Latest Version of Red Hat Virtualization
  • ProfsoUX 2017 Trip Report

    First of all, I was invited to come and give a talk by a friend, who lives in St Petersburg and works as a UX specialist (more about him later). He said people will be very interested in how open source design happens, what tools we use and what problems we face. It was an excellent opportunity to promote Red Hat and Fedora and meet professionals in my field of work. Furthermore, the UX scene in Russia is a bit different, and I was interested to find out how they work and what projects are going on. As always, conferences are great networking events, and I was happy to find out some people even came specifically to see me talk. So, altogether I really enjoyed ProfsoUX, now let’s talk about it in more detail.

  • Analyst’s Proposition on Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), Baker Hughes Incorporated (BHI)
  • Share Fedora: Maintaining Existing Community

    Last week the Fedora community was asked to share ideas for encouraging new contributors. Opensource.com collected many great responses. This week the blogging challenge continues with ideas on how to maintain existing community. his is another critical issue for Fedora on a regular basis. Share your thoughts and become part of the worldwide spread of open source and the ideas behind it.

The Raspberry Pi And Raspbian OS [The Cheapest Computer]

Filed under
Linux

​Linux is used almost everywhere from cars to smartphones and one the most important are small devices that we actually can call a computer, and is being used widely, in robotics, can be connected to your TV and be used as computer with a big screen, IoT (the inter connection via the Internet of computing devices embedded in everyday objects, enabling them to send and receive data), on drones and many other good options that can be applied.

Read<br />
more

Etcher - Burn Images To SD Card & Make Bootable USB

Filed under
Linux

​So for a distro hopper like me, one very useful tool is USB-ISO-MAKER. I always need to have these tools at my disposal as I am always testing out distros. For a long time, I have resorted to Rufus on Microsoft Windows as my most trusted USB ISO MAKER, and for all these times, I must confess, it has served me well. But the problem with Rufus, it requires Windows.

Read<br />
more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • A Global Menu Extension for GNOME Shell is in Development

    This global menu GNOME Shell extension brings a popular Unity feature to the GNOME desktop, and lets you interact with app menus from the top bar.

  • First GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Features Revealed, New Usage App Planned

    We're always monitoring everything that's going on in the Open Source world, especially big projects like GNOME and KDE, and today we'd like to reveal some of the upcoming features of the GNOME 3.26 desktop environment.

    First off, a little background for those who missed our previous reports on GNOME 3.26. The desktop environment will be dubbed "Manchester," after the name of the host city of the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) 2017 event, and has been slated for release on September 13, 2017.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Open Source Software: 10 Go To Solution for Small Businesses

While closed-source operating systems such as Windows and Mac OS may still dominate the OS market, not everyone can afford the high costs that they entail. For small- and medium-sized enterprises where every penny matters, taking advantage of open-source software such as Ubuntu’s Linux is a good bet to boost productivity and cost effectiveness. The fact that open-source softwares have evolved to become somewhat user-friendly and sleek also helps a good deal. Read more

Linux 4.11-rc8

So originally I was just planning on releasing the final 4.11 today, but while we didn't have a *lot* of changes the last week, we had a couple of really annoying ones, so I'm doing another rc release instead. I did get fixes for the issues that popped up, so I could have released 4.11 as-is, but it just doesn't feel right. It's not like another week of letting this release mature will really hurt. The most noticeable of the issues is that we've quirked off some NVMe power management that apparently causes problems on some machines. It's not entirely clear what caused the issue (it wasn't just limited to some NVMe hardware, but also particular platforms), but let's test it. Read more Also: Linux 4.11 delayed for a week by NVMe glitches and 'oops fixes' Linux 4.11 Pushed Back: 4.11-rc8 Released

Themes for Ubuntu

  • Flattiance is a Flat Fork of Ubuntu’s Ambiance Theme
    Flattiance is pitched as a “semi-flat fork” of the Ubuntu Ambiance theme. You know, the one that ships out of the box and by default. On the whole Flattiance keeps to the same color palette, with dark browns and orange accents, but it ditches the gradient in app headers in favour of a solid block.
  • A quick look at some essential GNOME Shell tweaks and extensions
    Now that Ubuntu is moving to GNOME Shell, many people will get a bit of a shock at how different the workflow is from Unity to Shell. Here’s a quick look at some essentials to get you going.