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Friday, 28 Aug 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Like open source software, a book is more than its content

Filed under
OSS

Instead, we chose to partner with Harvard Business Review (HBR) Press. In many ways, HBR does for books what Red Hat does for open source software; it collaborates with creators and adds value to the products of these collaborations. Like any piece of open source software (such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux, for example), a book is far more than the content it contains. Like a software application, a book is a project with multiple stakeholders. It involves an agent that works to put the book on publishers' radars. It involves an editorial team that reviews manuscripts and suggests improvements. And it involves a marketing team that decides how best to develop and target potential audiences.

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Samsung Galaxy Note 5 Review: The Best Android Phone That Spares No Expense

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Android
Reviews

The Galaxy Note has been through five years of changes. Better screens, better processors, better software. And like any new smartphone, the Note 5 represents the very best of what’s come before. But despite being a fantastic phone—even foreseeing the big smartphone way of life—the Note 5 is mired in the overpriced premium past. You’ll definitely be shelling out for the very best.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • My Linux!

    I know of no other OS that is, as modular, or allows you this much control, over the ability...

  • Why I gave up on the Linux Desktop repeatedly, and why I migrated back to it

    I wasn't initially accepted as an intern via the application process. But the 2 IT staff saw me helping a teacher with his laptop, and reconsidered my application on the spot.

    My high school was, and still is, a strong partner with Microsoft.

  • Mesa's Loop Analysis & Range Propagation Passes
  • Intel Continues To Divest In Wayland

    In the earlier days of Wayland, Intel was known for contributing a lot of resources toward this next-generation display technology to unseat the X.Org Server, but these days their contributions have been minimal.

    While Wayland 1.9 is coming next month, Intel's Open-Source Technology Center hasn't had much of a hand in the development of this new version along with the Weston 1.9 compositor. Wayland's releases continue to be managed by Bryce Harrington over at Samsung's open-source group.

  • Another KDE success story - the Incubator - Part 4

    Kdenlive, one of the rare free-as-in-speech video editors, started its life more than 12 years ago using KDE3 libraries. At that time, it was mostly the effort of a single person—coding, fixing bugs, publishing releases, managing the website. There was no real connection with the KDE Community. Good contributions came in from other people, but no team was built, a risky situation. In 2013, the main developer, Jean-Baptiste Mardelle, was not able to work on the project, so it was on hold for several months and had some technical problems. We tracked him down like a "Giant Spy" to get the project running until his return! That taught us a lesson. When Mario Fux presented the KDE Manifesto, it was the exact answer to our problem.

  • Linux Top 3: Sabayon Linux Embraces Docker, Q4OS Updates and PC-BSD 10.2

    The Docker container format makes it easier than ever to run application images on a Linux host, but what if you the application you want to run is an operating system? That's what Sabayon Linux is now enabling with Docker based images for its upcoming releases. Sabayon is a desktop-friendly version of Gentoo Linux.

  • SteamOS Brewmaster 2.30 Brings a New Linux Kernel and Autorepair Service

    Valve is working on SteamOS version based on Debian 8, and it's making good progress with it. The operating system is still considered a Beta, and it's not ready for prime time, especially since developers are still making important upgrades.

  • BQ announces Ubuntu running Aquaris smartphones in India via Snapdeal

    After being introduced earlier this year in European countries, the first Ubuntu phones are now been announced in India. A Spanish manufacturer, BQ has unveiled its Aquaris E4.5 and Aquaris E5 HD smartphones in India with the price tag of Rs. 11,999 and Rs. 13,499, respectively. The firm has reported that these handsets will be available in Black and White color variants, exclusively at e-commerce retailer, Snapdeal by the end of the month.

Leftovers: Kernel

Filed under
Linux

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • Shotcut – Video Editor Based on MLT Framework and Support for 4K UHD

    Shotcut is an free, open-source video editor app based on the MLT Multimedia Framework which works flawlessly on major operating system (Linux, Mac OSX and Microsoft Windows). Dan Dennedy as main developer shotcut video editor was started shotcut project in 2011, it is amature and stable application; both professionals and armatures use this to fulfill their video editing needs.

  • RcppDE 0.1.3

    A pure maintenance release 0.1.3 of the RcppDE package arrived on CRAN yesterday. RcppDE is a "port" of DEoptim, a popular package for derivative-free optimisation using differential optimization, to C++. By using RcppArmadillo, the code becomes a lot shorter and more legible.

  • Opera 33 Dev Adds Window Vibrancy Effect on Mac OS X, Better Windows 10 Support, Based on Chromium 46

    Opera Software, through Tomasz Procków, has informed all users of the Opera web browser that version 33 of the cross-platform software is now in development with lots of new features and numerous bugfixes.

  • Redbooth launches a desktop app for Mac, Windows, and Linux

    Redbooth, a company that sells software with task management, videoconferencing, and messaging features, is announcing today that it has built a new native desktop client for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Until now people were only able to use Redbooth in a web browser, or on iOS and Android.

    Redbooth is beginning a four-week beta program for the new desktop client. The company will roll it out for all of its customers later.

    The company chose to develop desktop apps to meet the needs of some of its large enterprise customers.

Leftovers: Gaming

Filed under
Gaming
  • Shadowrun: Hong Kong Arrives for Linux Players

    Shadowrun: Hong Kong, the third stand-alone game in the new Shadowrun series developed by Harebrained Schemes has been released on Steam, GOG, and Humble Bundle, and a Linux version is also available.

  • Five Super Cool Open Source Games

    In 2014 and 2015, Linux became home to a list of popular commercial titles such as the popular Borderlands, Witcher, Dead Island, and Counter Strike series of games. While this is exciting news, what of the gamer on a budget? Commercial titles are good, but even better are free-to-play alternatives made by developers who know what players like.

  • Old and Famous TuxRacer Game Arrives on Ubuntu Touch

    The Ubuntu Touch platform needs a lot of apps to attract more users, but it also needs games. There aren't a lot of complex, 3D titles available, and now TuxRacer is one of them.

  • Dying Light Crashes on Linux After Latest Patch, Here's the Solution

    Some users are reporting that Dying Light for the Linux platform no longer starts after the latest patch has been released.

    Dying Light is one of the newest triple A games that landed on Linux in the past few months. The performance wasn't great, and many users complained about the fact that it didn't seem like a quality port. The developers pushed a few patches out the door, and the quality of the game for Linux users increased tremendously, even if it's still not up to par with Windows.

  • Feral Interactive Buys More AMD Hardware to Optimize Linux Games

    Feral Interactive is a studio that specialized in porting games for the Linux and Mac OS X platforms, and they have already launched a number of titles. The developers are now making an extra effort to make their games work better on AMD hardware.

Red Hat and Fedora

Filed under
Red Hat

Android Leftovers

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Android

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • Open source for products in four rules (and 10 slides)
  • Apache Twill: real abstraction is a decoupled algorithm

    To be clearer, this term decoupling arises time & time again in relation to the cloud computing model of service-based processing and storage power.

  • Great Open Source Collaborative Editing Tools

    In a nutshell, collaborative writing is writing done by more than one person. There are benefits and risks of collaborative working. Some of the benefits include a more integrated / co-ordinated approach, better use of existing resources, and a stronger, united voice. For me, the greatest advantage is one of the most transparent. That's when I need to take colleagues' views. Sending files back and forth between colleagues is inefficient, causes unnecessary delays and leaves people (i.e. me) unhappy with the whole notion of collaboration. With good collaborative software, I can share notes, data and files, and use comments to share thoughts in real-time or asynchronously. Working together on documents, images, video, presentations, and tasks is made less of a chore.

  • Parse open sources its SDKs

    Earlier this month, mobile backend-as-a-service provider Parse open sourced its iOS, OS X, and Android SDKs, and will be open sourcing additional SDKs in the future.

    Parse, which was acquired by Facebook in 2013, says that its SDKs are used by more than 800 million active app-device pairs per month. By open sourcing those SDKs, Parse believes it can help developers facing challenges similar to those it faced. Specifically, according to Parse, "We’ve had to figure out a way to make a public-facing API easy to understand and use, but continue shipping features fast without breaking any existing functionality. To solve this, we structured our public API as a facade for internal code and functionality that could be consistently changing."

  • A word to the Wise…

    I have been recently reminded that while it may be hard enough to discuss the role and importance of communities for Free and Open Source Software, it is equally important to understand the complexities and the challenges that a Free and Open Source Software foundation has to meet.

  • Mozilla’s self-destruct course continues: major add-on compatibility changes announced

    Mozilla announced major upcoming changes to Firefox add-ons on the official Add-ons Blog today. These changes affect add-on developers and Firefox users alike, and will have a major effect on add-on compatibility and permissions.

  • Holes found in Pocket Firefox add-on

    Information security man Clint Ruoho has detailed server-side vulnerabilities in the popular Pocket add-on bundled with Firefox that may have allowed user reading lists to be populated with malicious links.

    The since-patched holes were disclosed July 25 and fixed August 17 after a series of botched patches, and gave attackers access to the process running as root on Amazon servers.

    Ruho says the bookmarking app functioned as an internal network proxy and subsequent poor design choices meant he could glean information on users including IP address data and the URLs customers saved for later reading. Adding redirects meant he gained access to the etc/passwd file.

  • Intel and Others Lead Massive New Funding Round for Mirantis

    It was just last October that I put up a post noting that Mirantis, which has steadily remained a nimble player in the OpenStack cloud computing arena, had nailed down a massive $100 million Series B funding round led by Insight Venture Partners. The financing was billed then as the largest Series B open source investment in history.

  • Intel backs OpenStack’s Mirantis with $100 million
  • Intel puts engineering and financial muscle behind OpenStack with $100m Mirantis funding boost

    The OpenStack open-source cloud-computing platform stands to gain more enterprise features thanks to a major financial and engineering deal between Intel and Mirantis.

  • Airbnb’s pricing algorithm and Aerosolve, its open-source machine learning tool

    Dan Hill, product lead at Airbnb, wrote the company’s pricing algorithm after the British-based rival startup he cofounded, Crashpadder, was acquired by Airbnb, the short-term rental giant, a few years ago.

  • Open vSwitch 2.4.0 Available
  • Open source part of Poland’s animal tracking project

    Poland’s Agency for Restructuring and Modernisation of Agriculture (ARMA) wants to modernise its animal identification and tracking system. The new solution is required to use Zabbix, an open source solution for IT security monitoring.

  • DataLook Hosts #openimpact to Encourage Replication of Civic Good Open Source Projects
  • Port of Rotterdam preparing for annual World Port Hackaton

    On September 4-5, the Port of Rotterdam is to hold the third edition of what has now become its annual World Port Hackaton. Hackers, programmers, stakeholders and enthusiasts are invited to attend the two-day event and join the teams. Together they will work on concepts and prototypes that deploy new technologies and (open) data, aiming to strengthen the safety, sustainability and competitiveness of the port.

  • FPGAs get into open source virtual reality eco

    Fully upgradable virtual reality headset, the Open-Source Virtual Reality (OSVR) Hacker Development Kit is now powered by Xilinx FPGAs. Buyers of this kit are provided with modules based platform, positioning and head tracking device, a display, and double lens optics.

  • PHP 7 drops first release candidate

    Faster PHP is approaching. PHP 7.0.0, which has been promoted as a much quicker upgrade to the server-side scripting language, has just gone into a release candidate stage, bringing its general availability even closer to fruition.

  • Infinity

    I’m writing a replacement for libthread_db. It’s called Infinity.

  • We’re still catching up to Perl

    That’s from a great little article by Chromatic about modern Perl in the latest issue of PragPub. The article goes in to discuss a number of other strengths of Perl, such as its strong community dedication to testing across numerous architectures, services for understanding package dependencies (that sound like they go beyond anything presently available for Ruby), and legendary standards of documentation.

  • Government seeks open standards feedback

    The government has launched a consultation on how best to proceed with several open standards proposals that will support inter-connected systems and more cost efficient digital transformation across Whitehall.

  • UK launches its next OGP Action Plan

    Open policy making, Open Data and international cooperation are three pillars that UK Minister for the Cabinet Office Matt Hancock wants to be included in the 2015 UK Action Plan, according to a speech given by the minister to mark the launch of a new Open Government Partnership (OGP) action plan (Transcript is accessible on the gov.uk website).

  • Flash is dying a death by 1,000 cuts, and that's a good thing

    Adobe’s Flash, hated the world over for slowing down computers, containing more holes in security than swiss cheese and stubbornly being the video carrier of choice until recently, is dying.

    Video players are migrating to other systems, even if Microsoft’s Silverlight isn’t much better. HTML5-based video and animations are becoming mainstream, and uploaders and other more advanced web-based features can now be replaced with code that doesn’t rely on Flash.

  • Kill Flash? Be careful what you wish for

    Back when Steve Jobs launched the first salvo in the war against Adobe Flash, declaring in no uncertain terms that the iPhone would never support the ubiquitous Web media framework, the anti-Apple crowd was much amused. No one is laughing now -- least of all the many IT vendors that have built their management interfaces in Flash, for whom the death of Flash poses huge challenges.

    At the time, Jobs seemed to be climbing out on a limb. But eventually, everyone came to see how painful it was to support Flash on mobile devices, and how much better HTML5 was at delivering the same basic functionality. Developers began skipping over Flash and going with alternative technologies so that they could support mobile and desktop clients with the same codebase.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • John McAfee: McAfee antivirus is one of the worst products on the planet
  • Highway to hack: why we’re just at the beginning of the auto-hacking era

    Imagine it’s 1995, and you’re about to put your company’s office on the Internet. Your security has been solid in the past—you’ve banned people from bringing floppies to work with games, you’ve installed virus scanners, and you run file server backups every night. So, you set up the Internet router and give everyone TCP/IP addresses. It’s not like you’re NASA or the Pentagon or something, so what could go wrong?

    That, in essence, is the security posture of many modern automobiles—a network of sensors and controllers that have been tuned to perform flawlessly under normal use, with little more than a firewall (or in some cases, not even that) protecting it from attack once connected to the big, bad Internet world. This month at three separate security conferences, five sets of researchers presented proof-of-concept attacks on vehicles from multiple manufacturers plus an add-on device that spies on drivers for insurance companies, taking advantage of always-on cellular connectivity and other wireless vehicle communications to defeat security measures, gain access to vehicles, and—in three cases—gain access to the car’s internal network in a way that could take remote control of the vehicle in frightening ways.

  • backdooring your javascript using minifier bugs

    In addition to unforgettable life experiences and personal growth, one thing I got out of DEF CON 23 was a copy of POC||GTFO 0x08 from Travis Goodspeed. The coolest article I’ve read so far in it is “Deniable Backdoors Using Compiler Bugs,” in which the authors abused a pre-existing bug in CLANG to create a backdoored version of sudo that allowed any user to gain root access. This is very sneaky, because nobody could prove that their patch to sudo was a backdoor by examining the source code; instead, the privilege escalation backdoor is inserted at compile-time by certain (buggy) versions of CLANG.

    That got me thinking about whether you could use the same backdoor technique on javascript. JS runs pretty much everywhere these days (browsers, servers, arduinos and robots, maybe even cars someday) but it’s an interpreted language, not compiled. However, it’s quite common to minify and optimize JS to reduce file size and improve performance. Perhaps that gives us enough room to insert a backdoor by abusing a JS minifier.

IBM adds Java to Bluemix for open source agility

Filed under
Server
OSS

How Linux was born, as told by Linus Torvalds himself

Filed under
Linux

Many people have read that post by Linus Torvalds in the comp.os.minix newsgroup on Usenet, or at least heard about it. Many more are aware of how that (free) operating system ended up taking over vast swathes of the computing world, and becoming both "big" and "professional." But what about before that famous moment? What were the key events that led to Linus creating that first public release of Linux?

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Also: 24 years young: The best of Linux is yet to come

Happy 24th birthday, Linux kernel

LinuxCon 2015 in Seattle: It's all about the servers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Then again, I always have a good time at Linux conferences. Whether they be the more community-driven events like the Southern California Linux Expo and LinuxFest Northwest or the more company-run expos like SUSECon and LinuxCon, these moments give me an opportunity to, quite simply, be around Linux nerds. Lots and lots of Linux nerds. These are my people.

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Why is Linux So Great? Because It’s Open Source!

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GNU
Linux
OSS

What can’t Linux do? Nowadays you hear Linux powering just about any device imaginable — all the way from dime-sized computers via the Raspberry Pi all the way to most of the top 100 supercomputers in the world. We interact with it daily, whether it be on our personal computers, Android devices, Steam boxes (gaming), flight entertainment systems, web servers that power behemoths such as Google, Facebook, and Wikipedia, or more.

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Zorin OS 10 Core - A good OS if you're coming from a heavy Windows background

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Reviews

Zorin OS Zorin OS is a GNU/Linux distribution that attempts to mimic the appearance of the Microsoft Windows operating system. I gave it a go roughly about a year and eight months ago (Zorin OS 8 Core) and my general impression was that it succeed in doing so, meaning that it was quite appealing in the eyes of a Microsoft Windows user.

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OpenSUSE 13.2 on Lenovo G50 - Bald and beautiful

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Reviews
SUSE

So this time around, the grade is going to be much lower. About 6.5/10. SUSE, please, you're better than that.

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Collabora contributions to Linux Kernel 4.2

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Linux

A total of 63 patches were contributed upsteam by Collabora engineers as part of our current projects.

In the ARM multi_v7_defconfig we have the addition of support for Exynos Chromebooks, all options that had a tristate Kconfig option were added as module. After this change it was found that a few drivers weren’t working properly when built as module, so this was fixed. This work was done by Javier Martinez.

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KDE Ships Plasma 5.4.0, Feature Release for August

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KDE

Tuesday, 25 August 2015. Today KDE releases a feature release of the new version of Plasma 5.

This release of Plasma brings many nice touches for our users such as much improved high DPI support, KRunner auto-completion and many new beautiful Breeze icons. It also lays the ground for the future with a tech preview of Wayland session available. We're shipping a few new components such as an Audio Volume Plasma Widget, monitor calibration tool and the User Manager tool comes out beta.

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