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Friday, 16 Nov 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu Founder Mark Shuttleworth Has No Plans Of Selling Canonical

Filed under
Ubuntu

A couple of weeks ago IBM announced its plan to buy Red Hat for $34 billion. Following that, experts started speculating that rival companies like Canonical and Suse would sell as well.

However, Canonical’s founder, Mark Shuttleworth, doesn’t seem to have any plans of selling the company — at least not in the near future. In an encounter with TechCrunch, he said, “I value my independence.”

One of the reasons behind this decision is that he doesn’t really need the money. But another big reason for not selling is his vision for Canonical and Ubuntu, which he would like to see through personally.

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A Journey on Budgie Desktop #2: Raven

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Raven, the Super+A menu, is the special right panel on Budgie Desktop Environment. It's represented by a white door icon with a left arrow on it beside the power icon on the top panel. It's interesting as it's fun to show/hide in end-user's perspective. It's unique, compared to same right-side panel concepts on BlankOn and deepin, it has own name Raven while being very minimal yet usable. See more below. This is the continuation after the first part talked about the Top Panel. Enjoy and please wait the next part about Applets!

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Ubuntu 19.04 Development Starts Off With Python 3.7, Merged Usr Directories

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu 19.04 "Disco Dingo" development is now officially underway.

Following the initial sync from Debian unstable, Ubuntu developer Matthias Klose announced this morning that "Disco Dingo is now open for development."

The initial prominent changes in the archive include landing Python 3.7 as the default Python3 version after Ubuntu 18.10 shipped with Python 3.6, removal of OpenSSL 1.0 with intending to only ship OpenSSL 1.1.1 LTS, and upgrading to Perl 5.28.

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New in Red Hat Enterprise Linux

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
  • PHP 7.2, Node.js 10, NGINX 1.14 and others now GA for RHEL

    These versions are available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (Devtools or RHSCL channel) for x86_64, s390x, aarch64, and ppc64le. Read more details about each component in the “New Components details” section.

  • GCC 8.2 now GA for Red Hat Enterprise Linux

    We are pleased to announce general availability of Red Hat Developer Toolset 8 beta for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7.

    [...]

    Like other tools, these are installable via yum from the Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 or 7 Devtools or RHSCL channel. For more details, see the “New Features” section below.

Google Shows Off New Android Dev Tools

Filed under
Android
Google

After years of teasing and speculation, it finally looks as though foldable screen smartphones are headed to market. Google's dev announcement followed closely on the heels of Samsung's announcement at its own developer conference of a folding phone/tablet prototype with Infinity Flex Display.

The Android tools will take advantage of the new display technology, which literally bends and folds, noted Stephanie Cuthbertson, director of product management at Google. The technology is based on two variations of screen design: two-screen devices and one-screen devices.

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More Empty Promises From Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft

Games: Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury, Humble Dystopian Bundle, Steam Play, DreamHack Atlanta 2018 and Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Crusader Kings II: Holy Fury smites its way to release, some thoughts

    Dealing with all things related to faith and righteous violence, the latest expansion to the venerable medieval strategy title has spiced things up considerably.

  • The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out with some nice Linux games included

    For those of you after some fresh games, The Humble Dystopian Bundle is out and it includes a couple good Linux titles.

    For the PWYW (Pay what you want) tier you will get Beholder and Orwell: Keeping an Eye On You. If you pay more than the current average then Orwell: Ignorance is Strength is yours.

  • Valve has expanded the Steam Play whitelist to include DARK SOULS III and plenty more

    There I am, in bed about to fall asleep when my phone lights up as I forgot to put it on silent. Thankfully so, as it turns out Valve just expanded the Steam Play whitelist and that's always a bit exciting.

    What is the whitelist? These are titles that Valve are confident enough that work out of the box with no additional configuration required. You don't need to turn any extra options on, they should just be click and play like any other Linux game on Steam.

  • Talk to us about open source gaming at DreamHack Atlanta 2018

    Red Hat is excited to sponsor our first esports event, DreamHack Atlanta on November 16-18, 2018. DreamHack is the world’s premier esports festival that celebrates the lifestyle of the gamer, and Red Hat will be there to sponsor a number of activities and provide a technical support booth for attendees who want to talk about gaming on open source platforms.

    Wait, Red Hat and esports? How do those go together?

    The majority of Internet infrastructure runs on Linux. The game servers, the streaming media servers, websites, and other infrastructure that powers online gaming? Much of that is powered by Linux. And Indie games are making a huge push to open source as well. We want to support that, because more open source is always a good thing!

  • Wine 3.0.4 Is En Route With New Icons, Dozens Of Bug Fixes

    Wine 4.0 should be out in early 2019 as the next major stable release of this increasingly used software for running Windows games and applications on Linux and other operating systems. For those not riding the bi-weekly development releases that lead up to the eventual Wine 4.0, Wine 3.0.4 is coming in the days ahead as the latest stable point revision.

    Wine stable point releases tend to be focused just on maintenance/bug/regression fixes, but Wine 3.0.4 will be a bit visibly different in that many Shell32 icons are added to this update. Dozens of Shell32 icons from the Zip and Jaz drive icons to 314k floppy drive icons to the start menu are bundled in Wine 3.0.4.

The Best Linux Distros For Beginners

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Everyone needs to start somewhere, and Linux is no different. Even though it became a meme, telling newcomers to install Gentoo isn’t very productive, and it harms the community as a whole.

There are distributions that work to make themselves accessible to people of every skill level and technical aptitude. They’re often called "Beginner distributions", but they aren’t just for beginners. Actually, any one of these choices would be great for everyone, but they’re also the best places for newbies to start.

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Security: Updates, Protecting the Digital Supply Chain, and Steam DRM Failure

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Protecting the Digital Supply Chain

    You first learn about the importance of the supply chain as a child. You discover a shiny object on the ground and as you reach down to pick it up your parent says “Don’t touch that! You don’t know where it’s been!” But why does it matter whether you know where it’s been? When your parents know where something came from, they can trust that it’s clean and safe for you to play with. When they don’t, their imagination runs wild with all of the disgusting bacteria and viruses that might taint it.

    The food supply chain is important. Food is sealed not just so that it will keep longer, but also so that you can trust that no one has tampered with it between the time it left the supplier to the time it goes in your grocery bag. Some food goes even further and provides a tamper-evident seal that makes it obvious if someone else opened it before you. Again, the concern isn’t just about food freshness, or even someone stealing food from a package, it’s about the supplier protecting you from a malicious person who might go as far as poisoning the food.

    The supply chain ultimately comes down to trust and your ability to audit that trust. You trust the grocery and the supplier to protect the food you buy, but you still check the expiry date and whether it’s been opened before you buy it. The grocery then trusts and audits their suppliers and so on down the line until you get to a farm that produces the raw materials that go into your food. Of course it doesn’t stop there. In the case of organic farming, the farmer is also audited for the processes they use to fertilize and remove pests in their crops, and in the case of livestock this even extends to the supply chain behind the food the livestock eats.

  • I found a security hole in Steam that gave me every game's license keys and all I got was this... oh nice: $20,000

    A bloke has told how he discovered a bug in Valve's Steam marketplace that could have been exploited by thieves to steal game license keys and play pirated titles.

    Researcher Artem Moskowsky told The Register earlier this week that he stumbled across the vulnerability – which earned him a $20,000 bug bounty for reporting it – by accident while looking over the Steam partner portal. That's the site developers use to manage the games they make available for download from Steam.

  • Hacker Receives $20,000 From Valve For Discovering Steam Bug That Generates Free Steam Keys

LibreELEC (Leia) v8.90.007 ALPHA

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

The LibreELEC 9.0 Alpha cycle has continued and releases for Amlogic and Slice hardware have been added additionally to the test cycle. We official support now Khadas VIM (AML S905X) and the LePotato (AML S905X) too. Since the 8.90.006 release we support a wide range of Rockchip devices. There are no plans to release LibreELEC 9.0 images for NXP/iMX6 hardware as support was removed from Kodi some months ago. Support will be reinstated in a future LibreELEC, we wrote an dedicated article about the future of LibreELEC.

Alpha releases are important to the team because we cannot test every scenario and sometimes sidestep issues without realising. The project needs a body of regular testers to go find the problems we miss. Testing will be particularly important for LibreELEC 9.0 as Kodi v18 includes substantial internal changes to VideoPlayer and introduces new retro-gaming capabilities.

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OpenStack Now Powers 75 Public Clouds Worldwide

Filed under
Server
OSS

While there is a lot of talk about large public cloud providers and other open-source cloud efforts in the media and elsewhere, the OpenStack Foundation continues to move forward, albeit with less hype than it once was able to muster.

On Nov. 13, the OpenStack Foundation announced that it is rebranding its OpenStack Summit event, which is running here Nov. 13-15, to the Open Infrastructure Summit, as part of the open-source organization’s continued movement to look beyond just its own core open-source cloud effort.

On the other hand, even as the OpenStack Foundation looks beyond its namesake project for the future, the present reality is that OpenStack is quietly powering a lot of cloud infrastructure. Although OpenStack is not thought of among the big three public cloud providers—Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform (GCP) and Microsoft Azure—it does power more than 75 other public cloud providers worldwide. At the OpenStack Summit, multiple operators and vendors including Huawei, Deutsche Telekom and OVH detailed how they are scaling increasingly larger cloud platforms, all powered by OpenStack.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Episode 43 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux we cover a big batch of releases from distros, apps, hardware and more. System76 launches the option to order their new Open Source Certified Desktop, Thelio. We got a big update from the Solus team about the future of the project. openSUSE announces the launch of their Legal Review System, Cavil. Fedora 29 has been released along with other releases like KDE Connect, Sailfish, i3 Window Manager, GIMP, VirtualBox and the Game Manager, Lutris. We’ll also take a look at some upcoming projects like Ubuntu 19.04, Cinnamon 4.0 and the Samsung DeX running Ubuntu. All that and much more!

  • Hegemon – A Modular System Monitoring Tool for Linux

    There are all kinds of Linux system monitoring tools such as top, htop, atop and many more that provide different output of system data such as resource utilization, running processes, CPU temperature and others.

    In this article, we are going to review a modular monitoring tool called Hegemon. It’s an open source project written in Rust, which works are still in progress.

  • Free Chess Club – A Modern Desktop App for Playing Chess Online

    It has been a while since we reviewed any games on FossMint. And even though I don’t know how many of our readers play chess, it is never too late for anyone to learn how to – especially since awesome services like the FICS exist. What, you’ve never heard about it? Read on.

    [...]

    Open Source: You can deploy the app to Heroku from GitHub.

  • The alias And unalias Commands Explained With Examples
  • Adding an optional install duration to LVFS firmware
  • Automate Sysadmin Tasks with Python's os.walk Function

    I'm a web guy; I put together my first site in early 1993. And so, when I started to do Python training, I assumed that most of my students also were going to be web developers or aspiring web developers. Nothing could be further from the truth. Although some of my students certainly are interested in web applications, the majority of them are software engineers, testers, data scientists and system administrators.

    This last group, the system administrators, usually comes into my course with the same story. The company they work for has been writing Bash scripts for several years, but they want to move to a higher-level language with greater expressiveness and a large number of third-party add-ons. (No offense to Bash users is intended; you can do amazing things with Bash, but I hope you'll agree that the scripts can become unwieldy and hard to maintain.)

    It turns out that with a few simple tools and ideas, these system administrators can use Python to do more with less code, as well as create reports and maintain servers. So in this article, I describe one particularly useful tool that's often overlooked: os.walk, a function that lets you walk through a tree of files and directories.

  • Our achievements in 2018

    On October 12, we started our yearly donation campaign. Today, we summarize what we achieved with your help in 2018 and renew our call for donations.

Openwashing With GitHub

Filed under
OSS
  • Twistlock Improves Cloud-Native Security With Discovery Tool

    There is a simple truism in much of IT, and that is that organizations can't manage what they're not aware of. As organizations increasingly make use of distributed teams that use cloud-native services, there is a nontrivial risk of application sprawl.

    On Nov. 13, container security vendor Twistlock announced its new open-source cloud-native discovery tool, in an effort to help identify and locate applications running on different public cloud services. The Cloud Discovery tool's initial release supports scanning on the three major public cloud providers: Amazon Web Services (AWS), Google Cloud Platform and Microsoft Azure.

    "Most customers tend to have a multicloud cloud strategy and then you combine that with the fact that everybody has got multiple accounts for different projects or business units, and so forth," John Morello, chief technology officer at Twistlock, told eWEEK. "You get this big equation where organizations try to figure out all the possible things that could be out there deployed and running.

  • Twistlock Releases Cloud Discovery Open Source Tool for Cloud Native Services
  • Microsoft's New Open-Source Project Is "Shader Conductor" For Cross-Compiling HLSL [Ed: Why does Phoronix help Microsoft's openwashing of proprietary lock-in, DX?]

GNU/Linux Skills, Raspberry Pi and FUD

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security
  • Raspberry Pi's potential is wider than you think

    What do you get for the techie who has everything? How about giving them a Raspberry Pi and letting them make pretty much anything. Or better yet, do it for yourself with the Ultimate Raspberry Pi eBook Bundle.

  • Systems Engineer Salary Rises Even Higher with Linux Experience

    Some companies treat “systems engineer” and “systems administrator” almost interchangeably, but there are significant differences between the two positions. In broadest terms, systems engineers must design and implement a company’s system (comprising the network, servers, devices, etc.), whereas systems administrators are largely charged with keeping everything running.

    To frame it another way, system administration is a very reactive role, with sysadmins constantly monitoring networks for issues. Systems engineers, on the other hand, can build a system that anticipates users’ needs (and potential problems). In certain cases, they must integrate existing technology stacks (e.g., following the merger of two companies), and prototype different aspects of the network before it goes “live.”

  • New Linux-Targeting Crypto-Mining Malware Combines Hiding and Upgrading Capabilities [Ed: When your system gets cracked anything can happen afterwards; does not matter whether there's an upgrade or not? No.]

    Japanese multinational cybersecurity firm Trend Micro has detected a new strain of crypto-mining malware that targets PCs running Linux, according to a report published Nov. 8.
    The new strain is reportedly able to hide the malicious process of unauthorized cryptocurrency-mining through users’ CPU by implementing a rootkit component. The malware itself, detected by Trend Micro as Coinminer.Linux.KORKERDS.AB, is also reportedly capable of updating itself.

Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu
Gadgets

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work.

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A Look At The GCC 9 Performance On Intel Skylake Against GCC 8, LLVM Clang 7/8

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With GCC 9 embarking upon its third stage of development where the focus ships to working on bug/regression fixes in preparation for releasing the GCC 9.1 stable compiler likely around the end of Q1'2019, here is a fresh look at the GCC 9 performance with its latest development code as of this week compared to GCC 8.2.0 stable while using an Intel Core i9 7980XE test system running Ubuntu Linux. For good measure are also fresh results from LLVM Clang 7.0 stable as well as LLVM Clang 8.0 SVN for the latest development state of that competing C/C++ open-source compiler.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • QOwnNotes 18.11.3
    QOwnNotes is a open source (GPL) plain-text file notepad with markdown support and todo list manager for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, that (optionally) works together with the notes application of ownCloud (or Nextcloud). So you are able to write down your thoughts with QOwnNotes and edit or search for them later from your mobile device (like with CloudNotes) or the ownCloud web-service. The notes are stored as plain text files and you can sync them with your ownCloud sync client. Of course other software, like Dropbox, Syncthing, Seafile or BitTorrent Sync can be used too.
  •  
  • Getting Started with Scilab
  • Huawei’s New Stance On Bootloader Lockdown Is An Unpopular One, Here’s How You Can Bypass It
    Let’s start with the basics. What do you mean by a bootloader? In simple words, Bootloader is a piece of code that runs before any operating system is running. Bootloader is used to boot other operating systems and usually each operating system has a set of bootloaders specific to it. Alternatively, the bootloader can start up recovery mode. When a phone is in recovery, it can execute large pieces of code that totally rewrite the Android operating system. The bootloader is important because it loads up both of these pieces of software. Without a working bootloader, your phone is a useless brick. A locked or unlocked bootloader is what gives you access to “root.” “Root” is another big word in the Android community. If you “root” a device, it means you have “superuser” access or “administrator” access to the operating system that runs on your phone. With an unlocked bootloader, you can install boot images that aren’t signed by the device maker. That includes custom images needed to boot an AOSP-based ROM, boot images patched to support Magisk root, and more. Now as handy and efficient as this might seem, it’s not a popular option publicised or encouraged by smartphone manufacturers. While companies like OnePlus and Google make it seamless by just having to enable “OEM unlocking” in Developer Options, and then entering a few fastboot (fastboot is a protocol for sending commands from a PC to the bootloader of your device) commands while your phone is in the bootloader menu; companies like Huawei or Honor (Huawei sub-brand) have stopped providing forms for allowing users to unlock their bootloader. That means there’s no longer an official way to get the bootloader unlock code for your Huawei or Honor smartphone or tablet. Nobody has yet figured out how these bootloader unlock codes are generated, so it’s impossible to generate one yourself.
  • Google’s Wear OS Version H Announced; Brings Battery Saver Mode
    Google quietly announced its Wear OS Version H (it’s basically version 2.2 of Wear OS) for smart wearables this morning. The new update will be rolled out as a system update and majorly, brings battery llife-related improvements to Wear OS watches.
  •  
  • The Huge Security Problem With C/C++ And Why You Shouldn’t Use It
    Alex Gaynor gives an example of a program that has a list of 10 numbers. Theoretically, in an event where someone asks for the 11th element, the program is expected to show an error of some sort, or at least that’s what a “memory safe” programming language (like Python or Java) would do. However, in case of a memory unsafe language like C/C++, the program looks for the 11th element wherever it is supposed to be (if it existed) and accesses its content. This is called a “buffer-overflow” vulnerability that is exploited by bugs like HeartBleed to access up to 60 KB data past the end of a list — that often includes passwords and other sensitive data.
  • The Power of Web Components
    As a group, the standards are known as Web Components. In the year 2018 it’s easy to think of Web Components as old news. Indeed, early versions of the standards have been around in one form or another in Chrome since 2014, and polyfills have been clumsily filling the gaps in other browsers. After some quality time in the standards committees, the Web Components standards were refined from their early form, now called version 0, to a more mature version 1 that is seeing implementation across all the major browsers. Firefox 63 added support for two of the tent pole standards, Custom Elements and Shadow DOM, so I figured it’s time to take a closer look at how you can play HTML inventor! Given that Web Components have been around for a while, there are lots of other resources available. This article is meant as a primer, introducing a range of new capabilities and resources. If you’d like to go deeper (and you definitely should), you’d do well to read more about Web Components on MDN Web Docs and the Google Developers site. Defining your own working HTML elements requires new powers the browser didn’t previously give developers. I’ll be calling out these previously-impossible bits in each section, as well as what other newer web technologies they draw upon.

OSS Leftovers

  • OpenStack regroups
    Only a few years ago, OpenStack was the hottest open-source project around, with a bustling startup ecosystem to boot. The project, which gives enterprises the tools to run the equivalent of AWS in their own private data centers, ran into trouble as it tried to tackle too many individual projects at the same time and enterprises took longer than expected to adopt it. That meant many a startup floundered or was acquired before it was able to gain traction while the nonprofit foundation that manages the project started to scale back its big tent approach and refocused on its core services.
  • SD Times news digest: Docker and MuleSoft’s partnership, ActiveState’s open-source language automation category, and Instana’s automatic Python instrumentation
    Docker and MuleSoft have announced a new partnership to modernize applications and accelerate digital transformation. As part of the partnership, the companies will work together to deliver new capabilities for legacy apps with APIs, legacy apps without APIs and new apps created in Docker. In addition, MuleSoft’s Anypoint platform will be combined with Docker Enterprise.
  • ActiveState Creates Open Source Language Automation Category
  • New open source cloud discovery tool arrives from Twistlock
    Cloud Discovery connects to cloud providers' native platform APIs to discover services such as container registries, managed Kubernetes platforms, and serverless services, and requires only read permissions. Other key features include:
  • Google Open-Sources "Amber" Multi-API Shader Test Framework
    The newest open-source graphics project out of Google is called Amber and it's a multi-API shader testing framework focused on capturing and communicating of shader bugs. Google's Amber tries to make it easier to capture/communicate shader bugs with a scripting-based workflow. The captured shaders can be in binary form, SPIR-V assembly, or a higher-level shading language. Amber is currently focused on supporting the Vulkan and Dawn graphics APIs.
  • Microsoft allies with Facebook on AI software [Ed: Evil likes/attracts evil. Now they can do their crimes together while blaming "AI". Longtime Microsoft propagandist Jordan Novet has decided to add the Microsoft lie (PR campaign) "Microsoft loves Linux" (in photo form) to an article that has nothing to do with Linux.]
  • Microsoft alliance with Facebook signals shift in AI approach

Android Leftovers

Security Leftovers