Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Thursday, 03 Sep 15 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Nextbit’s Robin Is An Android Smartphone That Taps The Cloud For Bonus Smarts

Filed under
Android

After weeks of teasing out little details on Twitter, Nextbit has finally spilled the beans on what they’ve been working: Robin, a “cloud-first” Android smartphone.

So what does “cloud-first” mean? At least initially (the company suggests that the cloud integration will only get deeper in time), it means smart, automated offloading of your photos, videos, and apps to free up the local storage space on your device.

Robin has 32GB of storage built in. As you fill this, it’ll automatically back up your photos and apps to a private 100GB box on their cloud server.

Read more

Xiaomi said to release notebook in 2016 with help from Inventec and Foxconn

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The sources believe Xiaomi will likely release a 15-inch notebook as it is the mainstream size in China and will adopt Linux operating system. The notebook is estimated to be priced at CNY2,999 (US$471) and will heap pressure on competitors' simliar products priced between CNY4,000-6,000.

Read more

Also: Xiaomi GNU/Linux Notebook In 2016

First RC Build of Tiny Core Linux 6.4 Adds a New ASCII Penguin in MOTD

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Robert Shingledecker, the creator, maintainer, and lead developer of the Tiny Core project announced earlier today, September 1, the immediate availability for download and testing of the first Release Candidate (RC) build of Tiny Core Linux 6.4.

Read more

Linux 4.3 Scheduler Change "Potentially Affects Every SMP Workload In Existence"

Filed under
Development
Linux

Aside from Ingo Molnar's x86 boot changes he sent in to Linus Torvalds for the Linux 4.3 merge window, he also sent in the scheduler changes for this next version of the Linux kernel.

With Linux 4.3 for those running any sort of SMP (Symmetric Multi-Processing) workloads, the performance could sway one way or another, but hopefully it's for the better.

Read more

Also: Better crypto, white-box switch support in Linux 4.2

Playing with OpenELEC 5.0.8

Filed under
Reviews

This week I want to quickly talk about two projects which have caught my attention. The first is OpenELEC. The OpenELEC (Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) distribution is an operating system which turns a computer into a media centre. OpenELEC is available in several editions. There are 32-bit and 64-bit x86 builds and a build for people running older NVIDIA video cards. There is a build for WeTek Play Systems, a depreciated build for AppleTV systems, a Freescale build and a couple of builds for Raspberry Pi computers. I decided to continue my Raspberry Pi experiments and downloaded the OpenELEC build for Raspberry Pi 2 computers.

Read more

LILO Boot-Loader Development To Cease At End Of Year

Filed under
Linux

While most of you probably haven't used the LILO bootloader in years in place of GRUB(2), the developer of "LInux LOader" intends to cease development at the end of the year.

This summer's intern, Eric Griffith, pointed out today an undated message on the LILO homepage about the bootloader project planning to end development at the end of 2015.

Read more

Systemd Takes Over su, FCC Bans Open Source Firmware

Filed under
Linux

Paul Carroty posted Friday of the news that Lennart Poettering merged an 'su' command replacement into systemd and Fedora Rawhide - coming to a Linux system near you next. Elsewhere, Hackaday.com's Brian Benchoff said new FCC regulations just killed Open Source firmware replacement and Phoronix.com today reported that LILO is being abandoned. Several polls caught my eye today as did the new Linux workstation security checklist.

Read more

Accelerating Scientific Analysis with the SciDB Open Source Database System

Filed under
OSS
Sci/Tech

Science is swimming in data. And, the already daunting task of managing and analyzing this information will only become more difficult as scientific instruments — especially those capable of delivering more than a petabyte (that’s a quadrillion bytes) of information per day — come online.

Tackling these extreme data challenges will require a system that is easy enough for any scientist to use, that can effectively harness the power of ever-more-powerful supercomputers, and that is unified and extendable. This is where the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center’s (NERSC’s) implementation of SciDB comes in.

Read more

Open Source GPU now out

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

Hoping that MIAOW is not a catastrophe

An open saucy general-purpose graphics processor (GPGPU) has been unveiled at the Hot Chips event.

The GPGPU is relatively crude and is part of another piece of an emerging open-source hardware platform called MIAOW.

Read more

Also: Nvidia Linux Video Driver 355.11 Adds Experimental OpenGL Support to EGL

Linux Kernel 3.12.47 LTS Out Now with Numerous x86 Improvements, Update Drivers

Filed under
Linux

Jiri Slaby, the maintainer of the Linux 3.12 LTS (Long-Term Support) kernel branch, announced the immediate availability for download of the forty-seven maintenance release, a milestone that brings enhancements to various instruction set architectures, as well as many updated drivers.

Read more

CUPS 2.1.0 Officially Released with Support for 3D Printers, IPP Everywhere, More

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The CUPS (Common UNIX Printing System) open-source and cross-platform printing system for GNU/Linux and Mac OS X operating systems reached version 2.1 after being in development for approximately three months.

Read more

New Android-x86 Release Peppered With Problems

Filed under
Android
Reviews

If you want one Linux-based OS to run on all of your devices, Android-x86 could become a viable alternative. The major advantage to running Android on all of your devices would be keeping all of your settings, apps and Google services on an equal footing. That is not happening yet, however.

Chih-Wei Huang, project maintainer for the Android-x86 Project, last month announced the release of Android-x86-r3 -- the third stable release of the Android-x86 project.

It certainly is more refined, but it is a work that needs more progress.

Read more

Fanless network appliance runs Linux on Marvell Armada 370

Filed under
Linux

Axiomtek’s fanless “NA150″ network appliance runs Linux on a Marvell Armada 370 SoC and offers five GbE ports, a 2.5-inch drive bay, and mini-PCIe wireless.

The NA150 is latest addition to Axiomtek’s family of compact desktop and rack-mountable network appliances, but it appears to be the first to stray from the well-trodden x86 path. Unlike the company’s similar circa-2011 NA330 and NA320R systems, which were powered by Intel Atoms, the NA150 is built around Marvell’s ARMv7-based Armada 370 system-on-chip.

Read more

Real pics of Samsung's clamshell Android with 16 MP camera emerge, flippin' awesome

Filed under
Android

Samsung's flip Android comes with two 3.9-inch Super AMOLED panels with 768 by 1280 pixels of resolution, both of them protected by layers of Corning's Gorilla Glass 4, which is the same ultra-resistant glass that you're going to find on high-end Samsung handsets such as the Galaxy Note5 or the Galaxy S6. The handset draws its processing power from the hexa-core Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 chipset, a SoC that's paired with 2 GB of RAM.

Read more

OpenBSD Is Getting Its Own Native Hypervisor

Filed under
BSD

The OpenBSD Foundation has been funding work on a project to provide OpenBSD with its own, native hypervisor.

The hypervisor's VMM is so far able to launch a kernel and ask for a root file-system, but beyond that, it's been laying most of the hypervisor foundation up to this point.

Read more

The Death of Ubuntu's Software Center

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the past few weeks, the fate of Ubuntu's Software Center has received a lot of press. There have been ample ravings about how the Software Center is about to vanish from the face of the Earth. In reality, it's not going anywhere yet. What is changing, however, will be the ability to submit new applications or updates to existing applications. In this article, I'll explain what this means and where things will likely go from here.

Read more

Exclusive Interview: Michael Miller of SUSE Talks About Transition and Contributing to Open Source

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

SUSE is one of the Linux trinity -- which comprises Red Hat, SUSE, and Canonical. SUSE is also one of the leading contributors to many open source projects, including the kernel itself. However, the company went through challenging times as it was acquired by one company after another. It seems that things have stabilized with the Micro Focus acquisition, so I sat down with Michael Miller, SUSE’s Vice President of Global Alliances & Marketing at LinuxCon and talked about topics ranging from acquisition to future plans.

Read more

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
Syndicate content