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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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SUSE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
GNOME
SUSE
  • GNOME 3.22 Now Available On OpenSUSE Tumbleweed
  • GNOME 3.22 Streamlines Into Tumbleweed

    Less than 48 hours from when GNOME’s release team unveiled version 3.22 (Karlsruhe), openSUSE Tumbleweed users are getting the full upstream experience of the latest GNOME.

    Snapshot 20160921 made 3.22 available to user, but there were plenty of other snapshots during the week that brought new packages to Tumbleweed users.

    Dominique Leuenberger, a member of the openSUSE release team, wrote that there were five snapshots this week in an email to developers on the openSUSE Factory Mailing List.

    The Linux Kernel updated to 4.7.4 and VirtualBox updated a version in the 20160920 snapshot. Snapshot 20160914 updated KDE Frameworks to 5.26.0 and KDE Applications 16.08.1.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Weeks 2016/38

Red Hat News

Filed under
Red Hat

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Ubuntu

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Should I Use an Open Source Ecommerce Cart?

    One of the biggest decisions small business owners make when launching an ecommerce site is deciding on which shopping cart to offer. Long gone are the days when a PayPal button on your website was sufficient. If you plan to run a modern online storefront that’s appealing to customers, a shopping cart is a must.

  • New Hardware Solutions Target Internet of Things

    New hardware strategies are taking shape in the Internet of Things space. In one of the more interesting new moves, SolidRun, a maker of System on Module (SoM) solutions, Single Board Computers (SBC) and Industrial PCs, today announced new products designed to reduce the required footprint, simplify the development process, and shorten the time to market for Intel Braswell-based IoT products. SolidRun claims that it now offers the world's smallest scalable SoM solution for Intel's 14nm Braswell family of quad-core processors.

    Meanwhile, Nextcloud, a new company forked from the ownCloud cloud platform is focusing on IoT as well. The company, Canonical and Western Digital have launched an Ubuntu Core Linux-based cloud storage and Internet of Things device called Nextcloud Box. It bundles the open source Nextcloud service and can be driven by a Raspberry Pi and Raspberry Pi 3 devices. This is essentially a turnkey and easy way to roll your own private cloud and manage it, but its base with Ubuntu Core enables the device to act as an extensible IoT gateway at home, controlling other devices and connecting them with their owners.

    SolidRun's new 14nm Intel Braswell chip based MicroSoM is designed to make harnessing Braswell chips for IoT applications simple.

  • Riot: Encrypted Open Source Messenger for Teams

    Smartphone users who communicate and often do teamwork like to have three different things. For starters, they like to easily communicate with their friends, family or work partners. Secondly, they want to use as fewer tools as possible, so it is ideal to have all their stuff in the same place. Last but not least, they want all this with the certainty of being secured and have their privacy assured.

    For anyone feeling this is their description, know that there is an app comprising all that: Riot, a secure messaging environment that brings online collaboration into one workspace. It is launching publicly this week, after a successful beta phase under the codename Vector. Riot is built on Matrix, an open standard for decentralized persistent communication.

  • Indoor navigation tool for blind individuals now available as open-source app

    Navatar, an indoor navigation system for students who are blind, launched this month as a free, open-source project that is available for Android phones.

    Navatar was developed by a research team led by Eelke Folmer, an associate professor of computer science and engineering, and developed with funding from Reader's Digest Partner's for Sight Foundation and Google Research.

    "Navigating campus environments can be quite a challenge for blind students and having to rely on a sighted guide is a significant loss of independence," Folmer said. "With Navatar we aim to remove this barrier and help more blind students pursue a college degree."

    Navatar overcomes a number of the obstacles traditionally associated with indoor navigation systems for blind users. Unlike existing systems, Navatar doesn't require any instrumentation and only relies on low-cost sensors available in smartphones and a digital map of the environment.

  • OpenSolaris-Derived Illumos Switching Away From GRUB 0.97 To A New Bootloader

    The OpenSolaris-derived Illumos project is rolling out its new bootloader project to use on new systems in place of its old GRUB (v0.97) legacy bootloader.

    This new bootloader for Illumos is derived from the FreeBSD boot loader. Illumos developers are switching away from GRUB-Legacy to this new loader in order to support functionality like UEFI booting, RAID-Z, and other modern features. The FreeBSD loader won the decision for the Illumos job rather than GRUB2.

  • GISWATER, Free and Open Source technology for the integral water cycle management

    When you need to design water supply or urban drainage master plans and you don't dispose of the adecuated tools, you pass a hard time. Me and my partner Josep Lluís we knew it by experience. We had many trouble to develop hydraulic projects without using a software affordable from an economic point of view, user-friendly and integrable with GIS technologies.

  • The must-have features for Perl 6

    Perl 6 came out in general release around Christmas 2015, and since then I've heard a lot of questions about it, both from people in and out of the Perl community. Jeff Goff is a longtime member of the Perl community and a good friend who's been heavily involved in Perl 6 development, so I asked him a few of the questions from what I've been hearing others ponder.

    Jeff has been speaking on the topic at conferences this year, including the upcoming OSCON London event. Get the inside scoop from my interview with him.

GNU News

Filed under
GNU

GNU/Linux Game Sales

Filed under
Gaming
  • 'SOMA' from Frictional Games sales figures released, Linux accounted for around 1.1% of sales

    Frictional Games, the developers of 'SOMA' [Official Site] have released their sales figures. The game sold about 450,000 copies of which 5,000 was from Linux gamers. So that's around 1.1%.

  • Survival Horror Game Sees Linux Sales Around 1%

    It's been one year since Frictional Games launched SOMA as their latest science fiction survival horror game. The game is supported on Windows, OS X, Linux, and PlayStation 4. This game saw close to half a million sales, but just over 1% of them were from Linux gamers.

    Frictional Games shared via a tweet that of the 450,000+ SOMA sales, Linux accounted for only around 5,000 sales, or about 1%. SOMA is powered by Frictional Games' in-house HPL Engine 3.

DIGMA presents the world’s first Tablet running Tizen 3.0 OS

Filed under
Linux

During the Forum “Internet of Things” (IoT), that was held on September 22, 2016 in Media Center MIA “Russia today” (Moscow), DIGMA presented the world’s first Tizen-based tablet running version 3.0 of the Operating System (OS) with a new “architecture designed for the Internet of Things”. This tablet is aimed squarely at businesses and government enterprise organizations that require data security and device stability from their OS and required apps.

Read more

7 things you need to know for WordPress development

Filed under
OSS

WordPress never fails to surprise the web development community. Over time, it has evolved into one of the best Content Management Systems (CMS) out there. And currently, it powers more than 25% of the web. Besides its popularity, WordPress is also known for usability and an easy-to-develop environment.

Read more

Revive Your Old PC With Lightweight Linux LXLE

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

LXLE is a super-lightweight, Lubuntu-based Linux distribution that should breath life in to most old machines. However, the big difference that LXLE offers over many other lightweight operating systems is that it has a focus on eye candy.

Just because you’re running a lightweight operating system, it doesn’t need to look like something from The Matrix!

I decided to install LXLE on an old Compaq Netbook that I had lying around the house. It’s fairly low-powered, having a first generation 1.6 GHz single core Intel Atom CPU, 2 GB of RAM, and a 160 GB 5400 RPM hard disk drive. This should be the perfect little machine to test LXLE on.

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2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Yasin Sekabira: Open Source Entrepreneur

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Reviews

Being a LiFT Scholarship 2016 recipient on paper is like a dream come true. It’s an opportunity to work even harder, train harder, and stay competitive in what you really do best,

Today open source and Linux are absolutely up there in the top, it’s an opportunity to sharpen my open source skills from newbie to Ninja Pro. With The Linux Foundation and Linus Torvalds, you just feel like you’re learning and mastering Kung fu from Bruce-Lee.

The LiFT Scholarship will help me to prepare for my LFCE (Linux Foundation Certified Engineer), and hopefully pass it and add it to my belt. The LFCE badge really shows the world that you can play like Messi or Score like T.Henry of Arsenal.

Read more

A Not For The Everyday Linux User Review Of Porteus 3.1

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Reviews

Ok, so this is the way I see it. Porteus is fine as a USB based distribution if you just want to use a web browser and maybe type a document.

For everything else it is just too difficult and for no real reward. For instance I could create a Xubuntu or Lubuntu persistent USB drive and all the hardware stuff would work out of the box and I would have access to the full software repositories.

With Porteus it feels like you are fighting it and if something is difficult to master then it needs to provide some reward for the effort such as having something so cool that you go wow.

Yes it is small at around the 300 megabytes mark and it boots quickly. The download screen is a good idea and whilst the idea of save files isn't new (Puppy does it, as do persistent *buntu distributions) the concept is a decent one.

The fact that you have to mess around with configuration files to get it to work and the fact that there is a concept of cheat codes and the fact that finding and installing software is so convoluted just makes it too much effort.

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4 command-line graphics tools for Linux

Filed under
Linux

Images and the command line. They seem an unlikely pair, don't they? There are people who'll tell you that the only way you can manipulate and view graphics is with GUI applications like GIMP.

For the most part, they're wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job.

Let's take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.

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GNOME Release Party Manchester

Filed under
Just talk

GNOME Release Party Manchester

Summary: Today's party celebrating the release of GNOME 3.22

RIANNE AND I both attended today's GNOME release party in Manchester. It was a good opportunity to meet some geeky people, including a few from Codethink, which organised this event.

Debian-based WiFi router adds security and parental controls

Filed under
Debian

The “Roqos Core” dual-band WiFi-ac router runs Debian on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers a cloud-based security and parental controls service.

A Tysons, Virginia headquartered startup called Roqos has begun shipping a home WiFi router, along with cloud-based “advanced cybersecurity and parental control features” sold on a subscription basis. The Roqos Core router costs $19 along with $17 a month for the Roqos Service, with a commitment of 12 months, or $223 total including the Core. After that you can choose to drop the service and continue to use the router without the extra security and parental controls.

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IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 105 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

This is the official release announcement for IPFire 2.19 – Core Update 105 which patches a number of security issues in two cryptographic libaries: openssl and libgcrypt. We recommend installing this update as soon as possible and reboot the IPFire system to complete the update.

Read more

Linux Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • 2D Rendering On X11 Remains Barely Faster Than CPU Rendering

    In addition to being the organizer of XDC2016, Martin Peres also participated in several presentations at this week's conference in Helsinki. One of these pesentations by Martin was concerning 2D X.Org acceleration.

    Martin basically presented on that rendering 2D on a modern X.Org Server is barely faster than CPU rendering, unless compositing. While being barely faster, it consumes more power than CPU-only rendering. But the good news is that more and more software is moving away from X-based rendering.

    With the next GTK+ release there will be the GTK Scene Kit, Qt5 already has changed its renderer, and other projects are moving over to purely CPU-based rendering or GPU rendering with projects like Servo's WebRender, Google's Skia, and the new Intel FastUIDraw project.

  • Don't Expect An Open-Source NVIDIA Vulkan Driver Anytime Soon
  • AMD's DAL Was Just Presented At XDC2016, Still Not Clear When It Will Be Mainlined

    Harry Wentland of AMD just presented at the XDC2016 conference about DAL, the big Display Abstraction Layer code-base, which many AMD Linux users have been waiting to see merged in order to have Polaris audio support and this is one of the stepping stones for seeing FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync and other modern display capabilities.

    We have been covering DAL for months since AMD open-sourced it and since then they've been trying to clean it up, remove some redundancies compared to what core DRM offers, etc. DAL is a big piece of the puzzle that's left for getting mainlined so the AMDGPU open-source kernel driver can be closer to feature parity with the closed-source driver and what's provided on Windows.

  • LunarG's Vulkan Sample Tutorials Is Easy For Learning This New Graphics API
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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Financial News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • What does it mean to change company culture?
    Tools are specific concrete things that a culture has decided is a way to improve a process. Buckminster Fuller has a great quote about tools and thinking: "If you want to teach people a new way of thinking, don't bother trying to teach them. Instead, give them a tool, the use of which will lead to new ways of thinking." In particular, DevOps tools can provide folks new ways to look at things—like delivering code into a production environment, for example. But there's lots of examples where a new tool doesn't influence the thinking of the people who use it, so things don't change.
  • Why Open Beats Closed
  • Google Improves Image Recognition; Releases Project as Open Source Software
    Google says its algorithm can correctly caption a photograph with nearly 94 percent accuracy. The company says the improvements come in the third version of its system named Inception, with the score coming from a standardized auto-caption test named ImageNet. It reports the first version scored 89.6 percent, the second 91.8 percent and the new one 93.9 percent.
  • Contributing to Open Source Projects Not Just For the Experts
    XDA has long been a proponent of open source development, and we’ve seen it flourish over the years. In fact, it’s one of the main reasons our community has grown as fast as it has over these past 13 years, with Android’s core being the driving force. Many people desire to be part of open source and contribute but often don’t know how they can, whether because they think they lack the skills or they just don’t have the time.
  • Firefox Reader Mode is Finally Getting a Keyboard Shortcut
    Among the changes which arrived in the September release of Firefox 49 were an enhanced set of Reader Mode features, including spoken narration and line-width spacing options. All very welcome. But the improvements aren’t stopping there. Firefox 50, which is due next month, will add another sorely needed feature: a keyboard shortcut for Reader Mode. Y
  • Introduction to OpenStack by Rich Bowen
    In this talk, Rich, the OpenStack Community Liaison at Red Hat, will walk you through what OpenStack is, as a project, as a Foundation, and as a community of organizations.
  • How Microsoft Measures Open Source Success [Ed: Wim Coekaerts got a bigger salary offer from Microsoft than from Oracle so now he’s propagandist/EEE in chief]
  • Public licenses and data: So what to do instead?
    Why you still need a (permissive) license Norms aren’t enough if the underlying legal system might allow an early contributor to later wield the law as a threat. That’s why the best practice in the data space is to use something like the Creative Commons public domain grant (CC-Zero) to set a clear, reliable, permissive baseline, and then use norms to add flexible requirements on top of that. This uses law to provide reliability and predictability, and then uses norms to address concerns about fairness, free-riding, and effectiveness. CC-Zero still isn’t perfect; most notably it has to try to be both a grant and a license to deal with different international rules around grants.
  • NIST Releases New 'Family' of Standardized Genomes
    With the addition of four new reference materials (RMs) to a growing collection of “measuring sticks” for gene sequencing, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) can now provide laboratories with even more capability to accurately “map” DNA for genetic testing, medical diagnoses and future customized drug therapies. The new tools feature sequenced genes from individuals in two genetically diverse groups, Asians and Ashkenazic Jews; a father-mother-child trio set from Ashkenazic Jews; and four microbes commonly used in research. NIST issued the world’s first genome reference material (NIST RM 8398)—detailing the genetic makeup for a woman with European ancestry—in May 2015. Together, all five RMs serve as a collection of well-characterized, whole genome standards that can tell a laboratory how well its DNA sequencing processes are working by measuring the performance of the equipment, chemistry and data analysis involved.
  • ANSI Seeks Organizations Interested in Serving as U.S. TAG Administrator for ISO Technical Committee on Blockchain and Electronic Distributed Ledger
  • Industrial IoT leaders work towards interoperability and open source collaboration

LLVM News

  • Pairing LLVM JIT With PostgreSQL Can Speed Up Database Performance
    Using the LLVM JIT with PostgreSQL can vastly speed up the query execution performance and shows off much potential but it hasn't been mainlined yet. Dmitry Melnik presented at this month's LLVM Cauldron over speeding up the query execution performance of PostgreSQL by using LLVM. Particularly with complex queries, the CPU becomes the bottleneck for PostgreSQL rather than the disk. LLVM JIT is used for just-in-time compilation of queries.
  • LLVM Cauldron 2016 Videos, Slides Published
    The inaugural LLVM Cauldron conference happened earlier this month ahead of the GNU Tools Cauldron in Hebden Bridge, UK. All of the slides and videos from this latest LLVM conference are now available.

A quick introduction to Audacity for teachers

School's back in session, and kids love the creative arts. One of my favorite open source creative tools is Audacity, the open source audio recorder and editor. Students love manipulating digital sound with Audacity: making podcasts, learning languages, recording interviews, and recording and mixing music. I use it to record podcasts for students to provide instructions about classroom procedures and tests. Foreign language students use Audacity to record and play back their lessons. Students can download music and other types of audio tracks for sharing and re-use from Creative Commons and Wikimedia, and dub their own voices onto music tracks, the sounds of birds chirping, whales and dolphins in their natural habitats, and more. Read more