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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Qt 5 based Colorpick Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:57pm
Story Raspberry Pi Foundation's Code Club teaches kids skills to compete in our digital world Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:56pm
Story The long-awaited Maru OS source release Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:48pm
Story KaOS Brings Serious Relevance Back to KDE Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:46pm
Story Another Set of Updated Fedora 24 Linux Live ISO Images Are Now Ready to Download Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:43pm
Story LinuxConsole 2.5 Gaming Distro Out Now with Minecraft, SuperTux, and Many Games Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:42pm
Story KDE Connect 1.0 is here! Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:40pm
Story City of Bern starts open desktop proof of concept Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:38pm
Story F25 Wallpaper Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:37pm
Story Linux survival guide: These 21 applications let you move easily between Linux and Windows Rianne Schestowitz 26/08/2016 - 6:33pm

Uganda's Move to Free/Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS
  • Uganda: Govt to Cut Costs With Open Source Software

    The private sector and government departments have been urged to adopt Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) to increase their efficiency and competitiveness, writes ALI TWAHA.

    FOSS is software with source code that anyone can inspect, modify, and enhance to suit their needs, something that is not possible with commercial software currently being used in most government departments.

    Speaking during the seventh African conference on FOSS at Speke Resort hotel in Munyoyo, ICT minister Frank Tumwebaze said government departments will gradually integrate the use of FOSS to reduce the cost of public service delivery.

    "Presently, government has been spending over $40m (Shs132bn) annually on commercial software from the like of Oracle systems and Microsoft Cooperation. [Using] FOSS will result into enormous savings that can be re-injected into other under-funded areas," Tumwebaze said.

  • Uganda: New Software Policy to Boost Innovation in Offing

    A Science, Technology and Innovations driven economy may soon be a reality in Uganda if Cabinet approves a free and open software being developed.

    Speaking at the 7th Africa Conference on Open Source Software at the Commonwealth Resort in Munyonyo on Monday, Mr James Saaka, the executive director of National Information and Technology Authority Uganda, said there is a lot of registered software being used but is very costly.

    He said globally, people develop Free Open Source Software (Foss) which Uganda would emulate for national development.

    Mr Saaka said the country is in the initial stages to develop Foss, adding that the software can spur investment in research and development.

    "We see that the Proprietary software is still expensive and if we are going to develop more online services, we can't afford but use alternative means to develop our e-government service," Mr Saaka said.

    He also added that in Uganda, there is an advent of talent skilled in Foss and can help in innovations.

Linux Turns 25 Exactly Today. More LinuxCon and Anniversary Coverage. Plus Microsoft Interjection PR.

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Virtualization 4

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat’s gunning for VMware with virtualization platform update

    Open-source Linux vendor Red Hat Inc. has thrown in support for OpenStack Neutron and other new technologies with the latest release of its software virtualization package, in what looks like a bid to steal customers away from VMware Inc.’s more widely-used solution.

    Targeted at convergence, Red Hat Virtualization 4 is the first version of the platform that doesn’t include the word “enterprise,” in a move that suggests the company is hoping its virtualized stack will become the platform for convergence, rather than a server density product.

    OpenStack Neutron is the open-source networking project used by Software-Defined Networks (SDNs), which up until now has only been available as a preview. Many have criticized Neutron’s development for lagging behind the rest of OpenStack’s code base, and Red Hat was one of several vendors to concede that things could be sped up a bit. With the inclusion of the software in Red Hat Virtualization, the company says its Linux platform can be used to run both cloud-enabled and “traditional” workloads in concert.

  • Red Hat Virtualization 4 woos VMware faithful

    It's easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn't forgotten about you.

    RHV (Red Hat Virtualization) 4.0, released today, refreshes Red Hat's open source virtualization platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat's product line. It's a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat's virtualization efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company's intention to woo VMware customers.

NOAA Breaks Weather Apps, Slackware Updates, Valve @ 20

Filed under
-s

The LinuxCon headlines continue to dominate but, more importantly, our desktop weather apps are broken thanks to NOAA decommissioning the site. Liam Dawe looked back at 20 years of Valve and Sebastian "sebas" Kügler introduced new KDE kscreen-doctor. Slackware rolled out some updates including a rare kernel upgrade and The VAR Guy wants to hear about your first time.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

GNOME News

Filed under
GNOME
  • The future is here

    Nautilus from master, updated everyday, parallel installable, in less than 3 minutes. I cannot believe this is possible. Note that due to be sandboxed with no permission handling there are things that are not working, like opening with an application.

    For someone not aware of the whole platform and the Linux desktop, it’s difficult to see how many implications this bring to us and the changes that will allow in the upcoming months. This truly changes the game for GNOME (and any other desktop) as a project and platform, including 3rd party developers and companies using Linux desktops or that want to support it.

  • GUADEC’16 report

    I got a chance to attend GUADEC’16 which happened in Karlsruhe, Germany from 11 – 17 August. I stayed for the whole duration including Workshop Day, core days and the later BOF days which were very learning. I’m grateful to my mentor David Woodhouse who guided me all the time. I thank GNOME community for giving me the chance to speak at intern lightning talk and i tried my best to present my project in front of those great people. I hope to get a chance someday again to speak up. We have finished our GSoC project so i am free now to wander around to find some more places and tasks in GNOME’s huge shelter. My experience of attending GUADEC was awesome, despite being a less speaker i was very comfortable to talk and interact to people in the community. I made some new friends in the community and i came to know a lot more about it. I loved attending social events after the long day of great and motivating talks. I am thankful to the GUADEC organizers, i didn’t feel any problem for a second staying 6,000 kms away from home.

  • GUADEC 2016

    I came back from Karlsruhe last week, where GUADEC 2016 took place.

    It was a wonderful event. Even though it was only my second GUADEC, I felt at home in this community, meeting with old and new friends.

  • Summer Talks, PurpleEgg

    The topics were different but related: The Flock talk talked about how to make things better for a developer using Fedora Workstation as their development workstation, while the GUADEC talk was about the work we are doing to move Fedora to a model where the OS is immutable and separate from applications. A shared idea of the two talks is that your workstation is not your development environment environment. Installing development tools, language runtimes, and header files as part of your base operating system implies that every project you are developing wants the same development environment, and that simply is not the case.

Fedora News

Filed under
Red Hat
  • UDP Failures and RNGs
  • F24-20160823 updated Live isos

    New Kernel means new set of updated lives.

    I am happy to release the F24-20160823 updated lives isos.

  • Curse you, Jon Masters! Why do you always have to be right!

    Long story short, Fedora 24 came out and I'm given the taste of the same medicine: the video on the ASUS is completely busted. I was able to limp along for now by using the old kernel 4.4.6-301.fc23, but come on, this is clearly a massive regression. Think anyone is there to bisect and find the culprit? Of course not. I have to do it it myself.

    So, how did F24 ship? Well... I didn't test beta versions, so I don't have much ground to complain.

  • Communication Anti-Patterns
  • Autocloud: What's new?

    Autocloud was released during the Fedora 23 cycle as a part of the Two Week Atomic Process.

    Previously, it used to listen to fedmsg for successful Koji builds. Whenever, there is a new message the AutocloudConsumer queues these message for processing. The Autocloud job service then listens to the queue, downloads the images and runs the tests using Tunir. A more detailed post about it’s release can be read here.

    During the Fedora 24 cycle things changed. There was a change on how the Fedora composes are built. Thanks to adamw for writing a detailed blogpost on what, why and how things changed.

NetworkManager 1.4 Adds Support for Setting IPv6 Tokenized Interface Identifiers

Filed under
Development

Today, August 24, 2016, Lubomir Rintel released the final build of the NetworkManager 1.4 open-source network connection manager software used by default in almost all GNU/Linux distributions.

Read more

elementary Devs Need Your Help for a 4 Day elementary OS Hackathon in Paris

Filed under
OS

The elementary OS developers are currently working very hard on the next major release of the Ubuntu-based distro, elementary OS 0.4 "Loki", and they are planning on an elementary Hackfest event in Paris, France.

Read more

LG V20 leak shows the Android phone is keeping its second screen

Filed under
Android

LG's V20 is set to debut on September 6th, but mobile leaker Evan Blass has already got his hands on a high-resolution image of the Android flagship and posted it to Twitter. The image shows off a rather bland-looking smartphone with an uncluttered home screen devoid of any duplicate apps and unnecessary bloatware. What we can see from this image is LG's commitment to the second screen concept it debuted with last year's V10.

Read more

PuppEX Linux Live CD Now Based on Puppy Xenial, Compatible with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux

Arne Exton informs us about the availability of a new stable build of its Puppy-derived PuppEX Linux Live CD distribution, version 160822, which is now using the latest kernel and software applications.

Read more

KDevelop 5.0 Open-Source IDE Officially Released with New C/C++ Language Support

Filed under
Development
OSS

After being in development for the past two years, the open-source KDevelop IDE (Integrated Development Environment) software has finally reached the 5.0 milestone.

Read more

Open source drone controller has an FPGA-enhanced brain

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Ubuntu

Aerotenna has launched an open source, $499 “OcPoc” drone flight controller that runs Linux on an Altera Cyclone V ARM/FPGA SoC.

Lawrence, Kansas based Aerotenna, which bills itself as “the leading provider of innovative microwave sensors and flight control systems,” describes OcPoC (Octagonal Pilot on Chip) as a ready-to-fly, open source flight control platform. The system integrates an IMU, barometer, GPS, and a CSI-camera interface.

Read more

Linux Kernel 3.16.37 LTS Is a Massive Update with Tons of Networking Changes

Filed under
Linux

Immediately after announcing the release of Linux kernel 3.2.82 LTS, maintainer Ben Hutchings proudly informed the community about the availability of the thirty-seventh maintenance update to the Linux 3.16 LTS kernel series.

Read more

New CentOS Atomic Host Update Released with Linux Kernel 3.10, Docker 1.10.3-46

Filed under
Red Hat

CentOS Project's Jason Brooks is back again with some awesome news for those interested in using the CentOS Atomic Host operating system designed for running Docker containers on top of the RHEL-based CentOS Linux 7 platform.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Refracta 8 Beta 2 Screenshot Tour
  • Please share the news! OpenMandriva Lx Project of the Week at SourceForge

    OpenMandriva Lx has been chosen by SourceForge to be among Projects of the Week August 22nd, 2016.

  • Ceph, Git, YaST, kernel update in Tumbleweed

    Four Tumbleweed snapshots were released since the last article and the snapshot of the week, 20160816, brought users a new version of gtk3 (3.20.8). Updated in the repositories for this snapshot was an updated version of yast2-auth-client (3.3.10). Cairo graphics fixed several bugs and Apache2 removed the omc xml config because the change log states it is “useless nowdays.”

    Snapshot 20160817 has several updates for the scalable storage platform ceph, which added an ability to reduce the constraints on resources required to build ceph and ceph-test packages. Git updated to version 2.9.3 and glib2 had several subpackages updated as did gnome-desktop. This snapshot caused quite a bit of chatter on the openSUSE Factory mailing list and serves as a reminder for people using openSUSE Tumbleweed to subscribed to the mailing list so they are aware of the updates.

  • Slackware Live Edition 1.1.3 based on Slackware -current 11 Aug 2016

    Last time I wrote about Slackware Live Edition was when I released the version 1.1.0 of the scripts. And that was two months ago; lots of updates have been made inbetween. Today I released version 1.1.3 of ‘liveslak’.

    I made a set of ISO images (during the last couple of days actually… it is time-consuming) for the Slackware Live Edition based on liveslak 1.1.3 and using Slackware-current dated “Thu Aug 11 18:24:29 UTC 2016“. These ISO images have been uploaded and are available on the primary server ‘bear‘.

  • Take that boredom

    While I was bored on Defcon, I took the smallest VPS in DO offering (512MB RAM, 20GB disk), configured nginx on it, bought domain zlatan.tech and cp'ed my blog data to blog.zlatan.tech. I thought it will just be out of boredom and tear it apart in a day or two but it is still there.

    Not only that, the droplet came with Debian 8.5 but I just added unstable and experimental to it and upgraded. Just to experiment and see what time will I need to break it. To make it even more adventurous (and also force me to not take it too much serious, at least at this point) I did something on what Lars would scream - I did not enable backups!

  • Mir 0.24 Released, Vulkan Still Not Supported
  • First Ever Smartphone Market Recession - Two Quarters of Market Decline Means Flat or Declining Annual Smartphone Sales for 2016 - Oh, and Q2 Market Data

    First off, the big news. We’ve hit the first Smartphone Market Recession. I just finished doing the Q2 market analysis (its the summer vacation and a slow time in tech, and the numbers are of course here, below) but yeah. We now do see the numbers clearly. Like in how they measure the GDP growth/decline as a measure of an economy being in a recession, we can now declare that officially, the smartphone market has hit its first-ever recession. For two quarters in a row, counting a 12 month moving average sales, the smartphone market has contracted. It hasn’t contracted by much (only 2%) but it is nonetheless the first time ever that this industry of less than 20 years of age has contracted. Even in previous global economic recessions, the smartphone market grew. Now it didn’t. So previously I was predicting a modest growth for the market from year 2015 to 2016, now I say there will be no growth, we’ll be lucky to have flat sales (about 1.44 Billion smartphones sold) and its likely we’ll be down a bit, like 1.41 Billion)

Leftovers: Software

Filed under
Software
  • MKVToolNix 9.4 Open-Source MKV Manipulation App Polishes Existing Functionality

    MKVToolNix creator Moritz Bunkus proudly announced the release of MKVToolNix 9.4.0, the latest stable and most advanced build of the open-source and free MKV (Matroska) manipulation software for GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows OSes.

    Dubbed Knurl, MKVToolNix 9.4.0 is not a major release, and there aren't many improvements added to its core components. Instead, this maintenance update tries to polish existing functionality and address a few of the issues reported by users since last month's MKVToolNix 9.3.1. Also, it comes with a warning for package maintainers who reported issues when compiling the app against libEBML 1.3.4 and libMatroska 1.4.5.

  • 4 Cloud-based Applications that Work Perfectly on Linux

    As far as cloud-based applications go, the market seems to be very competitive. With the recent OneDrive controversy, users are becoming much more conscious about how and where they invest their valuable data. Pricing changes or changes in business models have started to backfire against companies pretty quickly. In other words, cloud-based applications are no longer second-class citizens on the desktop. In fact, they have become a solid business model that big companies like Google, Microsoft, and Apple heavily rely on.

    Now that the cloud has become an end-user commodity rather than a product that was meant for data giants, companies are trying hard to increase the outreach of their cloud services to clients across all platforms. One such attempt is to bring more Linux users to the party by treating Linux-based desktops at the same level as their Windows and Mac counterparts. Many cloud-focused companies have already made available well-supported Linux clients for their services. This, in turn, has made Linux as a lucrative platform for people who dual boot or switch their computers a lot. That way, they can enjoy all their important files on Windows at work and Linux at home. It's a win-win situation for both parties.

    Today, we will be focusing on a few such cloud-based applications that work natively on Linux without any major glitches or bugs.

  • The Forecast Isn’t Looking Bright For GNOME Weather

    GNOME Weather is no longer able to display weather forecasts.

  • This App Lets You Set-Up And Configure Razer Keyboards on Linux

Linux on Servers

Filed under
Server
  • Kontena Launches Container Platform, Banks Seed Funding

    Startup Kontena has launched a container and microservices platform that, it claims, is designed to be developer friendly, easy to install and able to run at any scale -- attributes that, Kontena says, differentiate it from the current crop of container platforms.

    The Menlo Park, Calif.-based company, founded in March 2015, has also raised $2 million seed funding from Helsinki-based Lifeline Ventures. It also has a clever name: Say it out loud -- cute, huh?

    According to the team at Kontena Inc. , the startup's container and microservices platform requires zero maintenance, is designed for automatic updates, and runs on any infrastructure, including on-premises, cloud and hybrid. Combined, those attributes make it an easy-to-use alternative to platforms such as Docker, Kubernetes, Heroku and Mesosphere, the company says.

  • Stabilizing the world of hot and fast containers

    Containers are moving targets in multiple ways. With multiple tools, frameworks, implementations, and use cases to accomplish any task, it can be a fast-moving chaotic container world, which is a natural consequence of being young and popular.

    The good news is that all of this creative incubation is hugely productive, and because it's all open source everyone gets to share the benefits of all of this fabulous creativity. The bad news is that it's a giant energized cat herd. How do we know what direction to take? Must we plan for the work we do today to be obsolete in a few months? And, what about portability?

    I'd like to provide a few insights into the future of containers, and the direction we can expect the state of the art technology to take.

  • How DIGIT Created High Availability on the Public Cloud to Keep Its Games Running

    Emmanuel & Ross: HA is achievable on the public cloud. In our case, we couple redundancy across Availability Zone (AZ) with monitoring and autonomous systems to ensure our games can keep running. Using only one AZ will not ensure HA, as that entire zone could fail for a short time. Each of our applications runs in multiple containers at the same time. They're are all being monitored to handle current load. When one container is down, another takes its place. The same applies for all parts of our infrastructure. All services are autoscaling and behind a service discovery system. On top of this, nodes in our cluster are deployed across multiple AZs, each of which being an isolated network with its own NAT gateway. This way we can survive a whole zone going down.

  • Citrix Gives Away Netscaler Containers for Free

    Netscaler CPX Express, a developer version of the CPX container, is available for free downloading, the company announced yesterday at LinuxCon North America in Toronto. There’s even a catchy URL for it: microloadbalancer.com

  • LinuxCon: How Facebook Monitors Hundreds of Thousands of Servers with Netconsole

    The original kernel documentation for the feature explains that the netconsole module logs kernel printk messages over UDP, allowing debugging of problems where disk logging fails and serial consoles are impractical.

    Many organizations will choose to use syslog as a way to track potential server errors, but Owens said kernel bugs can crash a machine, so it doesn't help nearly as much as netconsole.

    He added that Facebook had a system in the past for monitoring that used syslog-ng, but it was less than 60 percent reliable. In contrast, Owens stated netconsole is highly scalable and can handle enormous log volume with greater than 99.99 percent reliability.

    "Netconsole is fanatically easy to deploy," Owens said. "Configuration is independent of the hardware and by definition you already have a network."

Android 7.0 Nougat

Filed under
Android
  • Android 7.0 Nougat review—Do more on your gigantic smartphone

    After a lengthy Developer Preview program starting in March, the final version of Android 7.0 (codenamed "Nougat") is finally launching today. The OS update will slowly begin to rollout to devices over the next few weeks. This year, Google is adding even more form factors to the world's most popular operating system. After tackling watches, phones, tablets, TVs, and cars, Nougat brings platform improvements aimed at virtual reality headsets and—with some help from Chrome OS—also targets laptops and desktops.

  • Google Android 7.0 Nougat Review – Surprisingly Uninspiring

    Since the past couple of years, Android updates have hit a concrete wall. Feature additions have gotten pretty mundane while focus on under the hood changes have become key for Google. Obviously, that’s a good thing, for some folks out there, but it’s a approach that doesn’t stand the test of time really very well. Users get frustrated after seeing the same thing over and over again. Same is absolutely true when you compare Android 7.0 Nougat directly with its predecessor, Android 6.0 Marshmallow.

  • Android 7.0 Nougat review: longer battery life and faster operation

    Android 7.0 Nougat is the new version of Google’s mobile operating system, used by billions of devices around the world.

    It features longer battery life, improved multitasking and smarter notifications in a slimmed down and refined Android experience – following on the work done in last year’s version 6 Marshmallow

    It is faster, more polished and a subtly-better experience all-round. Apps install more quickly, the OS can be smaller in size and updates to Android can be installed on the fly, without having to wait for 10 minutes while it reboots, if you have a new device. The new Vulcan API graphics system is also baked in for better gaming performance and Nougat will support Google’s Daydream virtual reality system, eventually.

    Nougat is not, however, a major visual overhaul of Android. Those that have used Marshmallow on any of Google’s Nexus smartphones or devices with little in the way of modification to Android, such as the OnePlus 3, will instantly recognise it.

  • The Best New Features In Android 7 Nougat

    The OS formerly known as Android N is officially out today for a range of Nexus phones. Now dubbed “Android Nougat”, the new mobile operating system ushers in some noteworthy improvements and new productivity tools which we’ve outlined below. But first, here are the Nexus models that are currently supported by the update:

  • Android 7.0 Nougat: a more powerful OS, made for you
  • Android 7.0 Nougat reviews: Should you upgrade your device?
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Q4OS 1.6, Orion

The significant Q4OS 1.6 'Orion' release receives the most recent Trinity R14.0.3 stable version. Trinity R14.0.3 is the third maintenance release of the R14 series, it is intended to promptly bring bug fixes to users, while preserving overall stability. The complete list and release notes you will find on the Trinity desktop environment website. New Q4OS 1.6 release includes set of new features and fixes. The default desktop look has been slightly changed, Q4OS 'Bourbon' start menu and taskbar has been polished a bit and has got a few enhancements, for example the icons size varies proportionally to the system panel. Native Desktop profiler tool has got new, optimized 'software to install' list. Read more

Learning More About Explicit Fencing & Android's Sync Framework

With the sync validation framework leaving the staging area in Linux 4.9 and other work going on around the Android sync framework and explicit fencing, this functionality is becoming a reality that ultimately benefits the Linux desktop. Collabora developer Gustavo Padovan presented at this week's LinuxCon 2016 conference about explicit fencing support in the mainline kernel with a "new era of graphics." Read more

Ubuntu Leftovers

Leftovers: Software Development

  • fakecloud
  • A new version of pristine-tar
  • Getting RSS feeds for news websites that don’t provide them
    On the technical side, this seems to be one of the most stable pieces of software I ever wrote. It never crashed or otherwise failed since I started running it, and fortunately I also didn’t have to update the HTML parsing code yet because of website changes. It’s written in Haskell, using the Scotty web framework, Cereal serialization library for storing the history of the past articles, http-conduit for fetching the websites, and html-conduit for parsing the HTML. Overall a very pleasant experience, thanks to the language being very convenient to write and preventing most silly mistakes at compile-time, and the high quality of the libraries.
  • Quick Highlight
    Martin Blanchard put together a new “quick highlight” plugin for Builder this last week. It was a great example of how to submit a new feature, so I just wanted to highlight it here. Post to bugzilla, attach a patch, and we will review quickly and help with any additional integration that might be necessary.