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Thursday, 19 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla rebrands with clever new logo and open source design principles Rianne Schestowitz 1 18/01/2017 - 10:05pm
Story The Fairphone 2 Running Ubuntu Will Be On Show at MWC17 Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:56pm
Story Linux Devices, Raspberry Pi, and Tizen Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:05pm
Story Debian News (manpages and TeX Live) Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:04pm
Story Security News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:03pm
Story Red Hat News Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:01pm
Story Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 9:01pm
Story PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 8:59pm
Story Licensing FUD and Licensing Advice Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 8:58pm
Story KDE Support For Flatpak Portals Progressing Roy Schestowitz 18/01/2017 - 8:34pm

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

Filed under
OSS
  • Open Source, Vendor Lock-In Are Top of Mind for Execs This Year

    The use of open source software has increased dramatically in the past decade, and this year could be the one in which we see real maturity in the market.

    Couchbase Chief Executive Officer Bob Wiederhold spoke with Information Management about what he sees for the market in 2017, as well as issues related to digital infrastructure and vendor lock-in.

  • Equal Rating Innovation Challenge: And the Semifinalists are…

    About three months ago we launched this global Equal Rating Innovation Challenge to help catalyze new thinking and innovation to provide access to the open Internet to those still living without. Clearly the idea resonated. Thanks to the help of numerous digital inclusion initiatives, think tanks, impact hubs and various local communities that supported us, our challenge has spurred global engagement. We received 98 submissions from 27 countries around the world. This demonstrates that there are entrepreneurs, researchers, and innovators in myriad fields poised to tackle this huge challenge with creative products and services.

    [...]

    Following the mentorship period, on March 9, we will host a day-long event in New York City on the topic of affordable access and innovation. We will invite speakers and researchers from around the world to provide their valuable insights on the global debate, various initiatives, and the latest approaches to affordable access. The main feature of this event will be presentations by our semifinalists, with a thorough Q&A from our judges. We will then have a week of open public voting on EqualRating.com to help determine the winners of the Challenge. The winners will then be announced at RightsCon on March 29 in Brussels.

  • Serverless Computing: 10 Things You Need to Know

    In fact, Gartner referred to serverless computing in its Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017. The firm sees serverless as part of the trend toward mesh app and service architecture, and explains, "the mesh app and service architecture (MASA) is a multichannel solution architecture that leverages cloud and serverless computing, containers and microservices as well as APIs and events to deliver modular, flexible and dynamic solutions." But the firm also cautions that this is a long-term trend that will require IT to adopt new tools and new ways of doing things.

  • Apache Beam Unifies Batch and Streaming Data Processing

    We're only half way through January of 2017, and as we've steadily taken note of, the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating numerous promising open source projects to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent times. Just last week, Apache graduated its Eagle project to Top-Level status. Eagle is an open source monitoring and alerting solution for instantly identifying security and performance issues on Big Data platforms such as Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark, and more.

  • Moat Supports IAB Open-Source Initiative
  • FSF New "High Priority Projects" List: Phone OS, Security, Drivers, More Inclusivity

    The list hasn't made much sense at times and projects on the list didn't necessarily advance during their time on the list or receive financial/developer support from the FSF along with other controversies. In 2014 they began forming a committee to maintain this high priority project list while today they announced a brand new list.

  • Happy birthday: Jimbo Wales' sweet 16 Wikipedia fails

    Sixteen years ago, Larry Sanger had the idea for a wiki-based encyclopaedia anyone could edit: the "wiki-pedia". On January 15, 2001, he and Jimmy Wales launched the site. Today, it's everyone's go-to place for quick factlets.

    Wikipedia's convenience is undeniable. But its anonymously compiled content has flaws and quirks traditional encyclopaedias never had. Understanding these is vital for wiki-literacy.

    To illustrate the issues, here are sixteen of Wikipedia's biggest cock-ups. Follow the hyperlinks to go down the Wikipedia wormhole...

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • 3 Lessons in Web Encryption from Let’s Encrypt

    As exciting as 2016 was for encryption on the Web, 2017 seems set to be an even more incredible year. Much of the infrastructure and many of the plans necessary for a 100 percent encrypted Web really solidified in 2016, and the Web will reap the rewards in 2017. Let’s Encrypt is proud to have been a key part of that.

    But before we start looking ahead, it’s helpful to look back and see what our project learned from our exciting first full year as a live certificate authority (CA). I’m incredibly proud of what our team and community accomplished during 2016. I’d like to share how we’ve changed, what we’ve accomplished, and what we’ve learned.

    At the start of 2016, Let’s Encrypt was supporting approximately 240,000 active (unexpired) certificates. That seemed like a lot at the time! Now we’re frequently issuing that many new certificates in a single day while supporting more than 22 million active certificates in total.

  • [Older] Kali Linux Cheat Sheet for Penetration Testers
  • Report: Attacks based on open source vulnerabilities will rise 20 percent this year [Ed: The Microsoft-connected Black Duck spreads FUD against FOSS again, together with IDG; Black Duck was created for the purpose of attacking the GPL, by its very own admission.]

    The number of commercial software projects that were composed of 50 percent or more of free, open source software went up from 3 percent in 2011 to 33 percent today, said Mike Pittenger, vice president of security strategy at Black Duck Software.

Raspberry Pi, Linux Devices, and LEDE 17.01

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Mycroft Available as Raspberry Pi Image

    Mycroft now has a Raspberry Pi image that is ready to run. Developers, makers, hackers and enthusiasts can download the image to their Raspberry Pi and create their own Mycroft enabled projects.

    We have created the Picroft image so the community has access to a quick, easy to install artificial intelligence(AI). Our thinking is that having ready access to an out-of-the-box AI will inspire some crazy cool applications. We’re hoping our community proves us right.

  • New Raspberry Pi Release Targets Industry, IoT

    The Raspberry Pi Foundation on Monday launched its long-awaited industrial strength Compute Module 3. The latest version of the low-cost Raspberry Pi computer, it is designed for more robust manufacturing and technical demand uses than prior versions, which target consumer and basic business needs. The idea behind the new module is to provide a cost-effective way to produce customized products based on the Raspberry Pi 3, noted James Adams, chief operating officer and hardware lead.

  • Blobless Linux on Raspberry Pi (rpi-open-firmware).
  • COM runs Linux on Kaby Lake, supports Intel Optane

    Congatec’s Linux-ready “Conga-TS175” COM Express Basic Type 6 module supports 7th Gen Intel Core E/EQ and Xeon CPUs, Intel Optane SSDs, and up to 32GB DDR4.

    Congatec followed upon its earlier announcement of a Conga-TC175 COM Express Compact Type 6 module with a larger, 125 x 95mm Basic Type 6 module called the Conga-TS175. Both COMs support Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” line of 14nm processors.

  • LEDE 17.01 branched

    this is just a heads-up to inform you that LEDE master has been branched into a new branch "lede-17.01" now.

FSF announces a major overhaul of free software High Priority Projects List

Filed under
GNU

The HPP list highlights projects of great strategic importance to the goal of freedom for all computer users. A committee of free software activists, assembled in 2014, spent a year soliciting feedback from the free software community for the latest revision of the list.

"As the technological landscape has shifted over the last decade since the first version of the list was published, threats to users' freedom to use their computers on their own terms have changed enormously," said Benjamin Mako Hill, who is part of the High Priority Projects committee and also a member of the FSF's board of directors. "The updated High Priority Projects list is a description of the most important threats, and most critical opportunities, that free software faces in the modern computing landscape."

Launched in 2005, the first version of the HPP list contained only four projects, three of them related to Java. Eighteen months later, Sun began to free Java users.

Read more

Also: Meet Guix at FOSDEM

KDE Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork

    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.

  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer

    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work.

    [...]

    Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.

  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released

    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.

  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month

    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

Filed under
OSS
  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing

    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.

  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem

    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software.

    Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.

  • FOSS Compositing With Natron

    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.

  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017

    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.”

    Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples.

    Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.

  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing

    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.

  • Why events matter and how to do them right

    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.

  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic

    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security.

    This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.

  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge

    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release

    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.

  • Mir: 2016 end of year review

    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.

  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017

    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.

  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live

    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core.

    Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).

  • 2016 in review

    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes.

    But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?

Development News

Filed under
Development
  • Dart-on-LLVM

    Dart already has an excellent virtual machine which uses just-in-time compilation to get excellent performance. Since Dart is dynamically typed (more precisely, it’s optionally typed), a JIT compiler is a natural fit — it can use the types available at runtime to perform optimizations that a static compiler can’t do.

  • Google Developers Experiment With Plumbing Dartlang Into LLVM

    It's been a while since last hearing much excitement around Google's Dart programming language that's an alternative to JavaScript. This ECMA-approved language is now being used with IoT devices, can still be source-to-source compiled for JavaScript, and the latest is that the Google developers have been experimenting with wiring it into LLVM.

  • A behind the scenes look at Exercism for improving coding skills

    In our recent article, we talked about Exercism, an open source project to help people level up in their programming skills with exercises for dozens of different programming languages. Practitioners complete each exercise and then receive feedback on their response, enabling them to learn from their peer group's experience.

    Katrina Owen is the founder of Exercism, and I interviewed her as research for the original article. There are some fantastic nuggets of information and insight in here that we wanted to share with anyone interested in learning to programming, teaching programming, and how a project like this takes contributions like this from others.

  • ‘You are Not Expected to Understand This’: An Explainer on Unix’s Most Notorious Code Comment

    The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix.

    And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • OpenStack Swift: Scalable and Durable Object Storage
  • OpenStack Swift by Christian Schwede, Red Hat

    In his LinuxCon Europe talk, Christian Schwede from Red Hat talked about how Swift is deployed at large enterprise companies with many of these deployments operating on a scale of multiple petabytes.

  • [Red Hat CEO] 5 resolutions to become a more open leader in 2017

    I'm always looking for ways to help people understand the power of open. And this year, I'm even more committed to showing others how a culture of openness can reinvigorate an organization and generate new opportunities for innovation, whether in the area of software development or beyond.

    Here are five resolutions we can all make if we want to become more open leaders in 2017.

  • ABR Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At 1.47
  • Fedora 26 Planning For A Modular Server Preview

    Fedora Linux has been pursuing a path of modularity whereby modules provide different software purpose/functionality and are integrated/tested at the module level and a unit of delivery itself. With the Fedora 26 release they are hoping to provide a Fedora Modular Server preview build.

  • Factory 2, Sprint 8 Report

    We are on track with respect to three of the four priorities: module build infrastructure will be ready before the F26 Alpha freeze. Our VMs are provisioned, we're working through the packaging rituals, and we'll be ready for an initial deployment shortly after devconf. Internally, our MvP of resultsdb and resultsdb-updater are working and pulling data from some early-adopter Platform Jenkins masters and our internal performance measurement work is bearing fruit slowly but steadily: we have two key metrics updating automatically on our kibana dashboard, with two more in progress to be completed in the coming sprints.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Truffle Hog Finds Security Keys Hidden in GitHub Code

    According to commentors on a Reddit thread about Truffle Hog, Amazon Web Services has already been using a similar tool for the same purpose. "I have accidentally committed my AWS secret keys before to a public repo," user KingOtar wrote. "Amazon actually found them and shut down my account until I created new ones. Kinda neat Amazon."

  • 5 Essential Tips for Securing Your WordPress Sites

    WordPress is by far the most popular blogging platform today.

    Being as popular as it is, it comes with its own strengths and weaknesses. The very fact that almost everybody uses it, makes it more prone to vulnerabilities. WordPress developers are doing a great job of fixing and patching the framework as new flaws are discovered, but that doesn’t mean that you can simply install and forget your installation.

    In this post, we will provide some of the most common ways of securing and strengthening a WordPress site.

  • Google ventures into public key encryption

    Google announced an early prototype of Key Transparency, its latest open source effort to ensure simpler, safer, and secure communications for everyone. The project’s goal is to make it easier for applications services to share and discover public keys for users, but it will be a while before it's ready for prime time.

    Secure communications should be de rigueur, but it remains frustratingly out of reach for most people, more than 20 years after the creation of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP). Existing methods where users need to manually find and verify the recipients’ keys are time-consuming and often complicated. Messaging apps and file sharing tools are limited in that users can communicate only within the service because there is no generic, secure method to look up public keys.

  • How to Keep Hackers out of Your Linux Machine Part 2: Three More Easy Security Tips

    In part 1 of this series, I shared two easy ways to prevent hackers from eating your Linux machine. Here are three more tips from my recent Linux Foundation webinar where I shared more tactics, tools and methods hackers use to invade your space. Watch the entire webinar on-demand for free.

Games for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Linux and Graphics

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Zorin OS 12 "Core"

Filed under
Reviews

Zorin 12 Core is available in 32-bit and 64-bit x86 builds and the ISO we download is 1.5GB in size. Booting from this downloaded image launches a graphical environment. A window appears and asks if we would like to try Zorin's live desktop environment or launch the project's system installer. We can select our preferred language at this time from a list of languages on the left side of the window. At the bottom of the window is a link to the project's release notes and clicking this link opens a web browser to display the on-line document.

Something I found odd was that when I clicked the link to display Zorin's release notes, the web browser worked. It opened as expected and brought up the desired information. However, when I opted to try exploring Zorin's live desktop environment, I found the one application which did not launch was the Chromium web browser. When attempting to open the browser from the application menu, nothing would happen. When trying to launch Chromium from a virtual terminal, the terminal would hang, neither opening the browser nor returning me to a command prompt and no errors were displayed.

Read more

Debian Updated, Mint KDE Beta, GIMP Preview

Filed under
-s

Debian 8.7 was made available this last weekend to address the security and major bugs since 8.6 announced August 2016. As usual, those updating regularly don't need to do anything as they're already current. Elsewhere, Linux Mint founder Clement Lefebvre announced a beta for Mint 18.1 KDE, something I'm looking forward to testing. Alexandre Prokoudine, graphics engineer known for Inkscape and GIMP, posted a preview of new features coming in GIMP 2.10. Dominic Humphries recently revelled in the joy of Linux that just works and Jiri Eischmann compiled a list of the latest Fedora accolades, some I've missed.

Read more

A Switch for Your Pi

Filed under
Linux

Thanks to the size of the Raspberry Pi, it's possible to build a project like this into just about anything. I don't have an NES case anymore, but if I did, I'd probably build it inside one for added nostalgia.

I decided to use RetroPie as the distribution for my project. The great thing about using RetroPie is that it basically solves all the issues on my list. It has the "Emulation Station" front end built right in (Figure 1), which supports navigation via controller. It also has emulators already installed, waiting for ROMs to be added. Truly, using RetroPie as my base saved at least one article on software alone!

Read more

Why Linux users should worry about malware and what they can do about it

Filed under
Linux

Preventing the spread of malware and/or dealing with the consequences of infection are a fact of life when using computers. If you’ve migrated to Linux or Mac seeking refuge from the never-ending stream of threats that seems to target Windows, you can breath a lungful of fresh air—just don’t let your guard down.

Though UNIX-like systems such as Mac OS X and Linux can claim fewer threats due to their smaller user bases, threats do still exist. Viruses can be the least of your problem too. Ransomware, like the recent version of KillDisk, attacks your data and asks you to pay, well, a king’s ransom to save your files. (In the case of KillDisk, even paying the ransom can’t save you if you’re running Linux.)

Read more

Getting my new Asus X540S notebook ready for Linux

Filed under
Linux

A number of my laptops and netbooks have moved on to other homes and other purposes recently, so I have been looking for something new.

Last weekend I saw an advertisement for an Asus X540SA at a ridiculously low price (CHF 299 / €280 / £245 / $300), which is always one of my criteria. Another criteria in this case was a 15" screen, and this ASUS has is 15.6", so that made the decision for me.

Read more

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME Recipes and Outreachy

  • Recipes for you and me
    Since I’ve last written about recipes, we’ve started to figure out what we can achieve in time for GNOME 3.24, with an eye towards delivering a useful application. The result is this plan, which should be doable.
  • Outreachy (GNOME)-W5&W6
    My plan was altered in this two-week, because the strings of GNOME 3.24 have not frozen yet and the maintainers of Chinese localization group told me the Extra GNOME Applications are more necessary to be translated than documents, so I began to translate the Extra GNOME Applications (stable) during this period.
  • [Older] Outreachy (GNOME)-W3&W4
    During this period, I finished the UI translation of GNOME 3.22, I’m waiting to reviewed and committed now, and I met some troubles and resolved them these days.

Home Recording with Ubuntu Studio Part One: Gearing Up

Twenty years ago, the cost of building a studio for the creation of electronic music was pricey, to say the least. The cost of a computer that was suitable for multimedia production could cost the average musician between $1,000 and $2,000. Add in the cost of recording software, additional instruments and equipment, and one could easily spend between $5,000 and $10,000 just to get started. But nowadays, you do not have to break the bank to start making music at home. The price of personal computers has dropped substantially over the past two decades. At the time of this writing, it is possible to get a notebook PC that’s suitable for audio production for around $500. Other pieces of equipment have also dropped in price, making it possible to build a functional recording studio for around $1,000. (Read the rest)

Leftovers: Gaming

Red Hat and Fedora