Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Repliessort icon Last Post
Story Do You Have an Xbox? srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:35am
Story This Week at the Movies: Hitch & The Aviator srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:34am
Story Latest On the Browser Wars srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:32am
Story Legislation to regulate games srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:31am
Story Typing Style Can Be Password srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:30am
Story Hey Coool, a Virtual Tour srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:30am
Story Experiences of a Linux Newbie srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story June Cleaver meets Fortune 500 srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story Predictions of Gloom and Doom srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:29am
Story EBay eyes open source srlinuxx 11/04/2005 - 3:28am

Security: Windows Ransomware, Cortana Holes, Google Play Protect and More

Filed under
Security
  • The worst types of ransomware attacks
  • Patched Cortana Bug Let Hackers Change Your Password From the Lock Screen
  • What is Google Play Protect and How Does it Keep Android Secure?
  • ​Another day, another Intel CPU security hole: Lazy State

    Once upon a time, when we worried about security, we worried about our software. These days, it's our hardware, our CPUs, with problems like Meltdown and Spectre, which are out to get us. The latest Intel revelation, Lazy FP state restore, can theoretically pull data from your programs, including encryption software, from your computer regardless of your operating system.

    Like its forebears, this is a speculative execution vulnerability. In an interview, Red Hat Computer Architect Jon Masters explained: "It affects Intel designs similar to variant 3-a of the previous stuff, but it's NOT Meltdown." Still, "It allows the floating point registers to be leaked from another process, but alas that means the same registers as used for crypto, etc." Lazy State does not affect AMD processors.

  • Eric S. Raymond on Keeping the Bazaar Secure and Functional
  • Purple testing and chaos engineering in security experimentation

    The way we use technology to construct products and services is constantly evolving, at a rate that is difficult to comprehend. Regrettably, the predominant approach used to secure design methodology is preventative, which means we are designing stateful security in a stateless world. The way we design, implement, and instrument security has not kept pace with modern product engineering techniques such as continuous delivery and complex distributed systems. We typically design security controls for Day Zero of a production release, failing to evolve the state of our controls from Day 1 to Day (N).

    This problem is also rooted in the lack of feedback loops between modern software-based architectures and security controls. Iterative build practices constantly push product updates, creating immutable environments and applying complex blue-green deployments and dependencies on ever-changing third-party microservices. As a result, modern products and services are changing every day, even as security drifts into the unknown.

Games, Emulators and Wine

Filed under
Gaming
  • Run your own Battle Royale in 'Battle Royale Tycoon' coming later this year

    It seems Endless Loop Studios is jumping on the Battle Royale hype train, although they're going about it in their own way with Battle Royale Tycoon. Yes—it's even infecting tycoon style games now.

  • Sweet puzzle game 'Hexologic' now supports Linux

    Hexologic is a new puzzle game that claims to have a new fun spin on Sudoku-like rules, it just recently added Linux support too. While the initial release at the end of last month was only for Windows, they quickly worked to bring it to Linux with the latest update.

  • Nouveau NV50 Gets Patches To Help Dolphin Emulator By As Much As ~50%

    If you are using the Nouveau Gallium3D driver there is now the possibility of having much better performance with the Dolphin emulator.

    Some Nouveau Gallium3D patches were posted today for benefiting the Dolphin video game console emulator that targets the Nintendo GameCube and Wii. These patches improve the performance of integer multiplication for this aging open-source NVIDIA driver and can help out the Dolphin emulator in areas of fragment-heavy scenes by as much as 50%.

  • Notepad++ on Linux is a Reality Thanks to This Snap Application

    The problem with Notepad++ is that it is exclusive to Windows platform and the developer has repeatedly refused to develop it for Linux. This is why Linux users had to settle for Notepad++ alternatives.

    Good news is that Notepad++ is now (unofficially) available as a Snap package for Linux user. Though this Notepad++ Linux application is not natively developed for Linux platform and is actually runs on Wine, it’s now a command (or click) away for you.

Linux 4.18 Addition Helps Dell + Thunderbolt Systems

Filed under
Linux

In addition to the secondary power management updates sent in on Wednesday for the Linux 4.18 kernel merge window, a set of ACPI updates were also submitted.

With this ACPI update that was already merged there is updates to the ACPICA code, debugger updates, and other routine work. Arguably the most user-facing change though is allowing Linux respond to the "Windows 2017.2" _OSI string. That Windows 2017.2 operating system interface string is what's used by Windows 10 Version 1709 in the latest buids of Windows.

Read more

Also: When and Why was Linux Created?

KDE: Mission Survey, Qt Quick , Krita

Filed under
KDE
  • Retrospective: The KDE Mission Survey

    It might sound a bit weird that I’m now talking about something that took place two years ago, but I just realized that while the call to participate in the survey for the KDE Mission was published on the Dot, the results have so far not received their own article.

    People who have participated in the survey but don’t read the Community list might have missed the results, which would be a pity. Therefore, I’d like to offer a bit of a retrospective on how the survey came to be and what came out of it.

  • Google Summer of Code, Porting Keyboard KCM to Qt Quick — Part 2

    Hi! It’s been quite a while since the first blog post. I’ve been working on the new redesign of the Keyboard KCM, and in this post I’m going to show you the progress I’ve made so far.

    Since last time, I’ve been mainly focusing on working improving the infrastructure. One of the goals of this project was to make configuring the input methods (like fcitx, ibus, …) in the System Settings easier. I decided to start with fcitx, since we know the developer of it (Xuetian Weng), and thus easier to ask when there is a question/problem.

  • Krita 4.0.4 Painting Software Has Been Released | Install On Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver)

    Krita is a free and open source advanced painting software for cross platform. The development team has just announced a new maintenance release Krita 4.0.4. It brings several bug fixes and stability improvements. Here are the major improvements of Krita 4.0.4.

  • GSoC: Krita AVX mask optimizations, setting up the environment.

    Hi! GSoC student here :]. This first weeks coding for Krita have been so busy I forgot to write about them. So I’ll start to sum everything up in short posts about each step of the project implementation process.

The Easiest PDO Tutorial (Basics)

Filed under
HowTos

Approximately 80% of the web is powered by PHP. And similarly, high number goes for SQL as well. Up until PHP version 5.5, we had the mysql_ commands for accessing mysql databases but they were eventually deprecated due to insufficient security.

Read<br />
more

Top Android Casual Games You Must Try

Filed under
Linux

Who needs serious hours of game-play when you could spend your minutes waiting for the bus playing something casual. No commitments to make, No stories to follow. Just start the game and have some fun. Here we have made a list of the top Arcade Games that you must try.

Read<br />
more

Programming With Python (LWN)

Filed under
Development
  • Unplugging old batteries

    Python is famous for being a "batteries included" language—its standard library provides a versatile set of modules with the language—but there may be times when some of those batteries have reached their end of life. At the 2018 Python Language Summit, Christian Heimes wanted to suggest a few batteries that may have outlived their usefulness and to discuss how the process of retiring standard library modules should work.

    The "batteries included" phrase for Python came from the now-withdrawn PEP 206 in 2006. That PEP argued that having a rich standard library was an advantage for the language since users did not need to download lots of other modules to get real work done. That argument still holds, but there are some modules that are showing their age and should, perhaps, be unplugged and retired from the standard library.

  • Advanced computing with IPython

    If you use Python, there's a good chance you have heard of IPython, which provides an enhanced read-eval-print loop (REPL) for Python. But there is more to IPython than just a more convenient REPL. Today's IPython comes with integrated libraries that turn it into an assistant for several advanced computing tasks. We will look at two of those tasks, using multiple languages and distributed computing, in this article.

    IPython offers convenient access to documentation, integration with matplotlib, persistent history, and many other features that greatly ease interactive work with Python. IPython also comes with a collection of "magic" commands that alter the effect of single lines or blocks of code; for example, you can time your code simply by typing %%time at the prompt before entering your Python statements. All of these features also work when using the Jupyter notebook with the IPython kernel, so you can freely switch between the terminal and the browser-based interface while using the same commands.

Linux kernel coverage at LWN (now outside the paywall)

Filed under
Linux
  • Flash storage topics

    At the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Jaegeuk Kim described some current issues for flash storage, especially with regard to Android. Kim is the F2FS developer and maintainer, and the filesystem-track session was ostensibly about that filesystem. In the end, though, the talk did not focus on F2FS and instead ranged over a number of problem areas for Android flash storage.

    He started by noting that Universal Flash Storage (UFS) devices have high read/write speeds, but can also have high latency for some operations. For example, ext4 will issue a discard command but a UFS device might take ten seconds to process it. That leads the user to think that Android is broken, he said.

  • The ZUFS zero-copy filesystem

    At the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Boaz Harrosh presented his zero-copy user-mode filesystem (ZUFS). It is both a filesystem in its own right and a framework similar to FUSE for implementing filesystems in user space. It is geared toward extremely low latency and high performance, particularly for systems using persistent memory.

    Harrosh began by saying that the idea behind his talk is to hopefully entice others into helping out with ZUFS. There are lots of "big iron machines" these days, some with extremely fast I/O paths (e.g. NVMe over fabrics with throughput higher than memory). "For some reason" there may be a need to run a filesystem in user space but the current interface is slow because "everyone is copy happy", he said.

  • A filesystem "change journal" and other topics

    At the 2017 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Amir Goldstein presented his work on adding a superblock watch mechanism to provide a scalable way to notify applications of changes in a filesystem. At the 2018 edition of LSFMM, he was back to discuss adding NTFS-like change journals to the kernel in support of backup solutions of various sorts. As a second topic for the session, he also wanted to discuss doing more performance-regression testing for filesystems.

    Goldstein said he is working on getting the superblock watch feature merged. It works well and is used in production by his employer, CTERA Networks, but there is a need to get information about filesystem changes even after a crash. Jan Kara suggested that what was wanted was an indication of which files had changed since the last time the filesystem changes were queried; Goldstein agreed.

  • Will staging lose its Lustre?

    The kernel's staging tree is meant to be a path by which substandard code can attract increased developer attention, be improved, and eventually find its way into the mainline kernel. Not every module graduates from staging; some are simply removed after it becomes clear that nobody cares about them. It is rare, though, for a project that is actively developed and widely used to be removed from the staging tree, but that may be about to happen with the Lustre filesystem.

    The staging tree was created almost exactly ten years ago as a response to the ongoing problem of out-of-tree drivers that had many users but which lacked the code quality to get into the kernel. By giving such code a toehold, it was hoped, the staging tree would help it to mature more quickly; in the process, it would also provide a relatively safe place for aspiring kernel developers to get their hands dirty fixing up the code. By some measures, staging has been a great success: it has seen nearly 50,000 commits contributed by a large community of developers, and a number of drivers have, indeed, shaped up and moved into the mainline. The "ccree" TrustZone CryptoCell driver graduated from staging in 4.17, for example, and the visorbus driver moved to the mainline in 4.16.

  • Statistics from the 4.17 kernel development cycle

    The 4.17 kernel appears to be on track for a June 3 release, barring an unlikely last-minute surprise. So the time has come for the usual look at some development statistics for this cycle. While 4.17 is a normal cycle for the most part, it does have one characteristic of note: it is the third kernel release ever to be smaller (in terms of lines of code) than its predecessor.

    The 4.17 kernel, as of just after 4.17-rc7, has brought in 13,453 non-merge changesets from 1,696 developers. Of those developers, 256 made their first contribution to the kernel in this cycle; that is the smallest number of first-time developers since 4.8 (which had 237). The changeset count is nearly equal to 4.16 (which had 13,630), but the developer count is down from the 1,774 seen in the previous cycle.

  • Deferring seccomp decisions to user space

    There has been a lot of work in recent years to use BPF to push policy decisions into the kernel. But sometimes, it seems, what is really wanted is a way for a BPF program to punt a decision back to user space. That is the objective behind this patch set giving the secure computing (seccomp) mechanism a way to pass complex decisions to a user-space helper program.

    Seccomp, in its most flexible mode, allows user space to load a BPF program (still "classic" BPF, not the newer "extended" BPF) that has the opportunity to review every system call made by the controlled process. This program can choose to allow a call to proceed, or it can intervene by forcing a failure return or the immediate death of the process. These seccomp filters are known to be challenging to write for a number of reasons, even when the desired policy is simple.

    Tycho Andersen, the author of the "seccomp trap to user space" patch set, sees a number of situations where the current mechanism falls short. His scenarios include allowing a container to load modules, create device nodes, or mount filesystems — with rigid controls applied. For example, creation of a /dev/null device would be allowed, but new block devices (or almost anything else) would not. Policies to allow this kind of action can be complex and site-specific; they are not something that would be easily implemented in a BPF program. But it might be possible to write something in user space that could handle decisions like these.

How to select the right enterprise Linux

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Enterprise Linux is widely thought of as the first choice in operating systems for important servers, but it may not be the right choice for all applications.

The decision to use any modern edition of that operating system, generally spoken as RHEL with a silent H, is usually based on a need for component stability, paid technical support, and long-term version support, said Red Hat's Ron Pacheco, director of global product management.

Customers have other options for data center operating systems. RHEL wouldn't always be appropriate for edge devices, functions-as-a-service, and highly specialized applications, Pacheco noted.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Acer Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 Will Support Linux Apps on Day One

    Acer's recently announced Chromebook 13 and Chromebook Spin 13 appear to be the first Chromebooks to ship with support for Linux apps out-of-the-box at launch.

    Google already announced that it worked on implementing support for Linux apps on Chrome OS during the Google I/O conference last month, and the first Chromebook to run Linux apps is Google's Pixelbook, as expected, and the functionality was later discovered to be available on the Samsung Chromebook Plus as well.

  • Why Open Source Needs Marketing (Even Though Developers Hate It)
  • ASIFA-Hollywood Continues Commitment To Open Source Animation Technology

    “The last few years, there have been incredible advancements in the quality of open source software solutions for artists,” says Danny Young, ASIFA-Hollywood board member. “Open Source software development is more than ever serving as a counterweight to put fantastic free technology in the hands of anyone who is curious enough to explore it. By supporting ASIFA-Hollywood, you make projects like this possible. So, thank you, ASIFA membership!”

  • Collabora Office 6.0

    Today we release Collabora Office 6.0 – the Migrator’s Choice with great features to smooth our customers’ migration to an Open Source office suite as well as a hugely improved set of features and enhancements.

  • BrowserStack Announces Enhanced Open-Source Program, EU's Web Censorship Plan, Qt for Python Now Available and More

    BrowserStack this morning announced its enhanced open source program, which offers free testing of open source software on the BrowserStack Real Device Cloud. The press release states that "BrowserStack is doubling down on its support for open source projects with full and unlimited access to the BrowserStack platform and its capabilities. The goal is to empower open source developers with the tools and infrastructure necessary to test with speed, accuracy and scale." See the BrowserStack blog post "Supporting Open Source to Drive Community Innovation" for more on BrowserStack's commitment to open source.

  • Locks in the classroom – 2018

    For the sixth year now, our grade nine students have been doing 3D modeling using Blender. We ran late this year, but the final locks were finished a couple of weeks ago, and they’re finally ready for publishing.

  • CVE-2018-3665: Lazy State Save/Restore As The Latest CPU Speculative Execution Issue

    The latest speculative execution vulnerability affecting modern CPUs has now been made public: Lazy State Save/Restore, a.k.a. CVE-2018-3665.

    This vulnerability concerns saving/restore state when switching between applications. The newly-disclosed vulnerability exploits lazy-state restores for floating-point state when context switching, which is done as a performance optimization, to obtain information about the activity of other applications on the system.

  • AI Is Coming to Edge Computing Devices

    Very few non-server systems run software that could be called machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI). Yet, server-class “AI on the Edge” applications are coming to embedded devices, and Arm intends to fight with Intel and AMD over every last one of them.

  • Cortex-A76, Mali-G76, and ML chip designs pump up AI

    Arm’s Cortex-A76 design offers speed/efficiency improvements including a 4x boost in AI performance, and is paired with a new Mali-G76 GPU that is also said to aid AI. Meanwhile, Arm revealed more details on its upcoming ML co-processors.

GNU/Linux Releases in Japan: Berry and Plamo

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Servers: Apache vs Nginx, Openstack, Red Hat, Cockpit and Docker

Filed under
Server
  • Apache vs Nginx Performance: Optimization Techniques

    Some years ago, the Apache Foundation’s web server, known simply as “Apache”, was so ubiquitous that it became synonymous with the term “web server”. Its daemon process on Linux systems has the name httpd (meaning simply http process) — and comes preinstalled in major Linux distributions.

    It was initially released in 1995, and, to quote Wikipedia, “it played a key role in the initial growth of the World Wide Web”. It is still the most-used web server software according to W3techs. However, according to those reports which show some trends of the last decade and comparisons to other solutions, its market share is decreasing. The reports given by Netcraft and Builtwith differ a bit, but all agree on a trending decline of Apache’s market share and the growth of Nginx.

  • Openstack Foundation branches out to 'open source infrastructure'

    Changes are underway at the Openstack Foundation, with the community branching out from the open source cloud platform to the umbrella of 'open infrastructure'.

    Openstack is the catch-all term for a series of open source cloud infrastructure components, ranging from bare metal provisioning (Ironic) to networking (Neutron) and compute (Nova), to name just a few.

    Originally emerging from a joint project between Rackspace and NASA, Openstack has travelled through various development models – such as the 'big tent' [link] approach, which essentially said that anything from any vendor could 'be' Openstack.

  • Maxta MxSP dons its Red Hat for container storage

    Maxta MxSP hyper-converged infrastructure is expanding integration with Red Hat. The software-only vendor has added support for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, which is built on Red Hat Container Native Storage with GlusterFS file system.

  • Red Hat Introduces Fuse 7, Buildah 1.0 to Ease App Development

    Today’s topics include Red Hat launching Fuse 7 and Buildah 1.0 for advanced application development, and a new ENCRYPT bill to create national encryption rules. 

    Red Hat is boosting its application development efforts with Fuse 7 and Buildah 1.0, which will help developers build and integrate cloud-native container applications. 

    With version 7, Red Hat is augmenting its Fuse cloud-native integration platform with a hosted low-code integration platform as a service called Fuse Online, allowing developers to create container-native integrated apps or APIs for OpenShift.

  • Cockpit 170

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 170.

  •  

  • Docker Advances Container Platform for the Multicloud World

    DockerCon 18 kicked off here on June 13 with Docker Inc. making a series of announcements that aim to further advance container adoption by enterprises.

    Docker announced it is enhancing its flagship Docker Enterprise Edition (EE) with a new federated application management capability that enables enterprises to manage and deploy containers across a multicloud infrastructure. The company is also improving its Docker Desktop application for developers with new template-based workflows for building container applications.

    "Federated application management shows how Docker Enterprise Edition can be used to provide a consistent, uniform secure environment across which you could manage applications on multiple clusters, whether they're on premises or in the cloud," Docker Chief Product Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK.

FOSS Talk Live 2018

Filed under
OSS
  • Little community conferences

    This last weekend I was at FOSS Talk Live 2018. It was fun. And it led me into various thoughts of how I’d like there to be more of this sort of fun in and around the tech community, and how my feelings on success have changed a bit since the early years.

    [..].

    Philosophical thoughts, admittedly, so how are they relevant? Well, if your goal is to get 50% of people on earth using your choice of OS then everything you do needs to be big, splashy, impressive. There’s not much room left in there for doing stuff just for the joy of it. But if what you have is already good then you’re no longer constrained to change it, just to enjoy it. And that’s what I meant about smaller conferences. Nobody showed up to FOSS Talk Live to hand out business cards, or even to make contacts. None of the podcasts are seeking their break-out into television. It’s done for joy. I like joy. Beethoven wrote music about it. I’d like there to be more joy and less striving in people’s lives, if we can manage it; the actual business of your life is hard and annoying and unpleasant sometimes, or maybe all the time. Having the things we do for fun actually be fun sounds like a good plan. FOSS Talk Live and Fusion feel so welcoming, so friendly; a place where, fine, we can unabashedly talk about tech without embarrassment, but equally there’s no pressure. It’s just nice. I’d like there to be more of that. Let’s work out how.

  • FOSS Talk Live 2018

    Saturday 9th June 2018 marked FOSS Talk Live 2018, an evening of Linux UK podcasts on stage at The Harrison pub near Kings Cross, London. It’s in its third year now, and each year has improved on the last. This year there were four live shows: Late Night Linux, Ubuntu Podcast, Linux Voice, and what we affectionally call the “Drunken Mashup Show” containing Joe from Late Night Linux, Dave Megins-Nichols from Geek News Radio, Marius Quabeck from Nerdzoom.de and… me, representing Bad Voltage. It was jolly good fun.

Chrome Goes Darker, Won't Let Users Install Extensions of Their Choice

Filed under
Google
  • Improving extension transparency for users

    We strive to ensure choice and transparency for all Chrome users as they browse the web. Part of this choice is the ability to use the hundreds of thousands of extensions available in the Chrome Web Store to customize the browsing experience in useful and productivity-boosting ways. However, we continue to receive large volumes of complaints from users about unwanted extensions causing their Chrome experience to change unexpectedly — and the majority of these complaints are attributed to confusing or deceptive uses of inline installation on websites. As we’ve attempted to address this problem over the past few years, we’ve learned that the information displayed alongside extensions in the Chrome Web Store plays a critical role in ensuring that users can make informed decisions about whether to install an extension. When installed through the Chrome Web Store, extensions are significantly less likely to be uninstalled or cause user complaints, compared to extensions installed through inline installation.

  • Now You Can’t Install New Chrome Extensions From Websites, Only Chrome Store

    Apart from its own feature set, tons of browser extensions are what make Google Chrome stand different from other web browsers. Just like it has for Android, Google maintains a dedicated storefront for Chrome users to find and install their favorite extensions.

    The extension developers can also make users install Chrome extensions from their websites as well – a method called inline installation. This is to save users’ time and efforts of visiting the Chrome Store and installing the extension from there. But Google says inline installation could be used for abusing and deceiving users.

  • Add a Dark Mode to Every Website With This Browser Extension

    Chrome/Firefox: Your monitor is basically a lightbulb, which is why white backgrounds are hard on the eyes. Dark Reader is a browser extension that turns bright websites dark, sparing your retinas.

  •  

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

Flatpak in detail

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME

At this point, Flatpak is a mature system for deploying and running desktop applications. It has accumulated quite some sophistication over time, which can make it appear more complicated than it is.

In this post, I’ll try to look in depth at some of the core concepts behind Flatpak, namely runtimes and extensions.

Read more

Krita 4.0.4 released!

Filed under
KDE

Today the Krita team releases Krita 4.0.4, a bug fix release of Krita 4.0.0. This is the last bugfix release for Krita 4.0.

Read more

Also: Plasma 5.13 Out

Copyleft Terms May Become Unenforceable in 11 Countries under CPTPP

Filed under
OSS

The Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans Pacific Partnership (CPTPP) is an enormous (roughly 6,000-page) treaty between Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam that was signed in Chile on March 8, 2018. So far, only Mexico and Japan have ratified it. CPTPP is almost identical to the original TPP, which included those 11 countries plus the United States. In early 2017, the US withdrew from the treaty, which its President had previously described as a "terrible deal".

CPTPP has many provisions of concern to the FOSS industries and communities in those countries. Open Source Industry Australia (OSIA) has raised a number of those issues with an Australian Senate committee's inquiry into CPTPP (see "CPTPP could still destroy the Australian FOSS industry" and "Submission to the Senate Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defense & Trade regarding the 'Comprehensive & Progressive agreement for Trans Pacific Partnership'"). The figure below shows the likely consequences of one such provision, Art. 14.17 in the Electronic Commerce Chapter, which deals with transfer of or access to source code.

Read more

Also: Conservancy Welcomes Racket as its Newest Member Project

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE/Qt: Qt 3D, Kube/Kolab, GSoC, and Atelier (3-D Printing)

  • What a mesh!
    With all the advances being made in Qt 3D, we wanted to create some new examples showing some of what it can do. To get us started, we decided to use an existing learning framework, so we followed the open source Tower Defence course, which you can find at CGCookie. Being a game, it allows an interactive view of everything at work, which is very useful.
  • Last week in Kube
    Perhaps if Windows wasn’t such a PITA there would be more progress
  • GSoC 2018: Week 4 & 5
    The last 2 weeks were mainly dedicatd for reviews and testing and thanks to my mentors, I passed the first evaluation with good work till now. Some significant changes were made on discussion with my mentors during the last 2 weeks in the code and some new features.
  • Giving Atelier some Love
    I work for atelier together with Chris, Lays and Patrick for quite a while, but I was basically being the “guardian angel” of the project being invocked when anything happened or when they did not know how to proceed (are you a guardian angel of a project? we have many that need that) For instance I’v done the skeleton for the plugin system, the buildsystem and some of the modules in the interface, but nothing major as I really lacked the time and also lacked a printer.

Proprietary Software on GNU/Linux

  • Winepak – Install Windows Apps and Games on Linux via Flatpak
    A reason for Linux not being more used as added in the comments section of a recent article is “Adobe and Games“. Well, there is a latest Linux bad guy in town and it is here to comfort us in a cooler way than Wine.
  • Mark Text Markdown Editor Adds Sidebar And Tabs Support
    Mark Text is a somewhat new free and open source Electron Markdown editor for Windows, Mac and Linux, which supports the CommonMark Spec and the GitHub Flavored Markdown Spec. The app features a seamless live preview using Snabbdom as the render engine, multiple edit modes (Typewriter, Source Code and Focus), includes code fence support, light and drak themes, emoji auto-completion, and export to PDF, HTML or styled HTML.
  • Google’s VR180 Creator Makes It Easier to Edit VR Video on Linux
    It’s called “VR180 Creator” (catchy) and the tool aims to make it easier for people to edit video shot on 180-degree and 360-degree devices like the Lenovo Mirage camera (pictured opposite). And boy is just-such a tool needed! VR180 Creator: Easier VR Video Editing Editing VR video is, to be perfectly frank, a pain in the rump end. So by releasing this new, open-source tool for free Google is being rather smart.Anything that makes it easier for consumers and content creators to edit VR on something other than a high-end specialist rig is going to help the format flourish.

Devuan GNU+Linux 2.0.0 "ASCII"

When I am trying out a desktop distribution, what really tends to divide the field of Linux distributions in my mind is not whether the system uses MATE or Plasma, or whether the underlying package manager uses RPM or Deb files. What tends to leave a lasting impression with me is whether the desktop environment, its applications and controls feel like a cooperative, cohesive experience or like a jumble of individual tools that happen to be part of the same operating system. In my opinion Ubuntu running the Unity desktop and Linux Mint's Cinnamon desktop are good examples of the cohesive approach. The way openSUSE's administration tools work together provides another example. Like them or hate them, I think most people can see there is an overall design, a unifying vision, being explored with those distributions. I believe Devuan falls into the other category, presenting the user with a collection of utilities and features where some assembly is still required. This comes across in little ways. For example, many distributions ship Mozilla's Firefox web browser and the Thunderbird e-mail client together as a set, and they generally complement each other. Devuan ships Firefox, but then its counterpart is the mutt console e-mail program which feels entirely out of place with the rest of the desktop software. The PulseAudio sound mixing utility is included, but its system tray companion is not present by default. Even the system installer, which switches back and forth between graphical windows and a text console, feels more like a collection of uncoordinated prompts rather than a unified program or script. Some people may like the mix-and-match approach, but I tend to prefer distributions where it feels like the parts are fitted together to create a unified experience. What I found was that Devuan provided an experience where I had to stop and think about where items were or how I was going to use them rather than having the pieces seamlessly fit together. However, once I got the system set up in a way that was more to my liking, I appreciated the experience provided. Devuan offers a stable, flexible platform. Once I shaped the operating system a little, I found it to be fast, light and capable. Having a fairly large repository of software available along with Flatpak support provided a solid collection of applications on a conservative operating system foundation. It was a combination I liked. In short, I think Devuan has some rough edges and setting it up was an unusually long and complex experience by Linux standards. I certainly wouldn't recommend Devuan to newcomers. However, a day or two into the experience, Devuan's stability and performance made it a worthwhile journey. I think Devuan may be a good alternative to people who like running Debian or other conservative distributions such as Slackware. I suspect I may soon be running Devuan's Raspberry Pi build on my home server where its lightweight nature will be welcome. Read more Also: deepin 15.6 Released With New Features: Get This Beautiful Linux Distro Here

Android Leftovers