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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story New OSI President Steps Down srlinuxx 2 05/03/2005 - 5:04am
Story Cronkite denounces the war on drugs. srlinuxx 3 05/03/2005 - 6:07am
Story Texas Gaming Festival: Quick Peek at the LAN Party srlinuxx 06/03/2005 - 3:16pm
Story The Rock solidifies Doom movie role srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:29am
Story Bumbling Bully srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 2:30am
Story A Week with KDE 3.4rc1 srlinuxx 5 08/03/2005 - 3:46pm
Story Student in High School zombie terror threat srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:00pm
Story European democracy bogus, says Open Source Consortium srlinuxx 2 08/03/2005 - 4:27pm
Story Linux Making Inroads into Automotive Industry srlinuxx 1 08/03/2005 - 4:59pm
Blog entry Cooker (Mandrake 10.2b3) Woes srlinuxx 1 09/03/2005 - 7:08pm

Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

Filed under
Misc
  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts

    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.

  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks

    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks

  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications

    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations.

    What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.

  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge

    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.

  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released

    Based on Slackware64-current

    Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers Smile

  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Security: Updates, Nintendo 'Hackers', Microsoft Windows Back Doors, and FlightSimLabs Malware

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Hackers Release Video Of Nintendo Switch Running A Linux Distro

    When it comes to porting software to potentially unsupported devices, hackers are quite comfortable to push themselves beyond the boundaries set by the manufactures.

  • Epidemic of cryptojacking can be traced to escaped NSA superweapon [Ed: It's a Microsoft Windows issue. All versions of Windows (ME onwards) have NSA back doors]

    It all started when the Shadow Brokers dumped a collection of NSA cyberweapons that the NSA had fashioned from unreported bugs in commonly used software, including versions of Windows. The NSA discovered these bugs and then hoarded them, rather than warning the public and/or the manufacturers about them, in order to develop weapons that turned these bugs into attacks that could be used against the NSA's enemies.

  • Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

    Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.

Software and Games Leftovers

Filed under
Software
Gaming
  • LXD Weekly Status #35

    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while.

    We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week.

    On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.

  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released

    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!

  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade

    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.

  •  

  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience

    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.

  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price

    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.

  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th

    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.

KDE and GNOME Leftovers

Filed under
KDE
GNOME
  • Kdenlive Café tonight and beta AppImage

    The last months for Kdenlive have been very quiet from the outside – we were not very active on the bugtracker, did not make a lot of announcements, and the 17.12.x release cycle only contained very few minor bugfixes.

    The main reason for this was the huge work that went behind the scenes for a major code refactoring that was required to allow further developments. So after more than a year working on it, we hope to get ready for the 18.04 release!

  • [Krita] Interview with Christine Garner

    I did Archaeology in University and I love history, mythology, folklore and nature. I’ve always been drawing from an early age. I graduated in 2003 with an archaeology degree. I taught myself digital art and web coding skills for fun and practical reasons. I used to do self-employed web design and admin type jobs, but in 2013 I became disillusioned with my life and had depression. I took a Foundation art course in 2013 deciding to pursue my artistic passions instead.

  • Qt 5.11 Brings New Accessibility Backend on Windows

    Accessibility technology encompasses assistive tools such as screen readers, magnifiers and braille displays, as well as APIs and frameworks that allow applications to expose elements of their UI to such tools.

  • CSS Grid

    This would totally have been a tweet or a facebook post, but I’ve decided to invest a little more energy and post these on my blog, accessible to everybody. Getting old, I guess. We’re all mortal and the web isn’t open by its own.

    In the past few days I’ve been learning about CSS grid while redesigning Flatpak and Flathub sites (still coming). And with the knowledge of really grokking only a fraction of it, I’m in love.

OSS: Project Names, Events, NSF and Mozilla, ArangoDB, Oracle, Bitcoin and More

Filed under
OSS
  • Choosing project names: 4 key considerations

    Working on a new open source project, you're focused on the code—getting that great new idea released so you can share it with the world. And you'll want to attract new contributors, so you need a terrific name for your project.

    We've all read guides for creating names, but how do you go about choosing the right one? Keeping that cool science fiction reference you're using internally might feel fun, but it won't mean much to new users you're trying to attract. A better approach is to choose a name that's memorable to new users and developers searching for your project.

    Names set expectations. Your project's name should showcase its functionality in the ecosystem and explain to users what your story is. In the crowded open source software world, it's important not to get entangled with other projects out there. Taking a little extra time now, before sending out that big announcement, will pay off later.

  • FOSDEM 2018 Community DevRoom Recap: Simon Phipps & Rich Sands

    It’s been a few weeks now since FOSDEM and if you didn’t have a chance to attend or watch the  livestream of the FOSDEM 2018 Community DevRoom, Leslie my co-chair, and I are doing a round up summary on posts on each of the talks to bring you the video and the highlights of each presentation. You can read the preview post of Rich Sands and Simon Phipps pre FOSDEM blog post here.

  • Scheduling Voxxed Days Zurich 2018 with OptaPlanner

    My name is Mario Fusco and I’m honored to be the Program Committee Lead of Voxxed Days Zurich for the third year in a row. Reading, evaluating, discussing, and selecting from the 200+ proposals that arrive every year is a long and challenging process. I must admit, I largely underestimated the task the first year I started doing it. It’s necessary to evaluate not only the quality of every submission, but also how they fit together. In the end, the worst part is having to reject so many incredible proposals because there are a limited number of slots.

    However, once all the talks have been selected and all the approval and rejection emails have been sent, the process is still not complete. Now it is time to take all the accepted talks and schedule the actual program. Even for a moderate sized event like Voxxed Days Zurich (the conference lasts only one day and we have four parallel tracks), this is not a trivial task. There are many constraints and nice-to-haves that you may need to consider. For example, some speakers will arrive late in the morning or will have to leave early in the afternoon.  Some talks require different room capacities.  Two talks belonging to the same track must not be scheduled at the same time. There are many more variables to this process.

  • 20 Big Ideas to Connect the Unconnected

    Last year, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Mozilla announced the Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges: $2 million in prizes for big ideas to connect the unconnected across the U.S.

    Today, we’re announcing our first set of winners: 20 bright ideas from Detroit, Cleveland, Albuquerque, New York City, and beyond. The winners are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack. Winning projects were developed by veteran researchers, enterprising college students, and everyone in-between.

    What do all these projects have in common? They’re affordable, scalable, open-source, and secure.

  • ArangoDB publishes industry-wide open source NoSQL performance benchmark

    ArangoDB, a provider of native multi-model NoSQL database solutions, announced the latest findings of its open source NoSQL performance benchmark series. To enable vendors to respond to the results and contribute improvements, ArangoDB has published the necessary scripts required to repeat the benchmark.

  • Can one 'multi-model' database rule them all?

    ArangoDB open source NoSQL performance benchmark series is one such open study.

  • Oracle-Supported Port of DTrace?, Linux Foundation Announces Akraino, New Feral Interactive Game and Qt 5.11 Alpha

    For those of us who have been holding out to see an Oracle-supported port of DTrace on Linux, that time is nearly here. Oracle just re-licensed the system instrumentation tool from the original CDDL to GPLv2.

  • Kernel patch releases, WineHQ, OpenIndiana project, FreeBSD Unix distribution, Xubuntu community contest

    The OpenIndiana project is still alive and well with a recent announcement of migrating the project to GCC 6.4. Unfortunately, this version does not cover the Spectre/Meltdown vulnerabilities, although the next version planned is 7.3 which will cover these hot issues.

  • Satoshi’s Vision? Bitcoin Cash Gets It Wrong, Says Max Keiser

    The movement was formally founded in 1983 by Richard Stallman with the launch of the GNU Project, which was founded on the idea that proprietary software harms users to the benefit of large corporations.

  • Bitcoin's Developers Are Debating A Change To Its Open License

    Ever since its launch last August, bitcoin has had an antagonistic relationship with its offshoot, bitcoin cash. But their battle may have provided a trigger to seek ways to protect bitcoin’s core code from indiscriminate use.

  • A new Maryland bill would allow students to buy textbooks tax-free twice a year [Ed: This is a reaction to open-source (Open Access) books and maybe an attempt to extinguish such state-level initiatives]

    University of Maryland student Kayla Little has wanted to be a doctor since she was 11 years old — but a nationwide rise in textbook prices has proved to be an obstacle to her success.

    "I've wanted to go into medicine for the longest [time], and I really don't want to give that up for books," said Little, who hopes to go to medical school and become an orthopedic surgeon for a professional sports team.

  • How the Grateful Dead were a precursor to Creative Commons licensing

    From its founding in 1965, the Grateful Dead was always an unusual band. Rising amidst the counterculture movement in the San Francisco Bay Area, the Grateful Dead’s music had roots in multiple styles and genres but did not lend itself to easy categorization. Was it psychedelic? Folk? Blues? Country? Yes, it was all of these and more. The band frequently performed well-known public domain songs, but they made the songs their own.

    Members of the band could effortlessly play across traditional and diverse styles. At concerts, they often performed songs that sounded familiar at first but grew and evolved across styles and genres. Songs often turned into lengthy jam sessions in which musicians played off one another, discovering new musical motifs and expanding them together.

Rust things I miss in C and learning to program is getting harder

Filed under
Development
  • Rust things I miss in C

    Librsvg feels like it is reaching a tipping point, where suddenly it seems like it would be easier to just port some major parts from C to Rust than to just add accessors for them. Also, more and more of the meat of the library is in Rust now.

    I'm switching back and forth a lot between C and Rust these days, and C feels very, very primitive these days.

  • Learning to program is getting harder

    I have written several books that use Python to explain topics like Bayesian Statistics and Digital Signal Processing. Along with the books, I provide code that readers can download from GitHub. In order to work with this code, readers have to know some Python, but that's not enough. They also need a computer with Python and its supporting libraries, they have to know how to download code from GitHub, and then they have to know how to run the code they downloaded.

    And that's where a lot of readers get into trouble.

Ubuntu and Debian/Freexian News

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • A Simple App Menu Editor for Ubuntu

    If you’re looking for an easy way to edit application launchers and menu entries on Ubuntu you’ll want to check out AppEditor.

    AppEditor is an easy to use

    Alacarte has been the go-to menu editor for almost as long as I’ve been using Ubuntu. It’s still perfectly functional, but it hasn’t really changed since then.

    ‘AppEditor’ would probably be better named Menu Entry Editor or Launcher Editor, or something other than App Editor as, rather than edit apps, it lets you edit app menu entries for apps, rather than the apps itself.

  • Canonical got Juju eyeballs for storage

    Canonical’s is mixing new potions in its Juju charm store.

    Juju is Canonical’s open source modelling tool for cloud software — it handles operations designed to deploy, configure, manage, maintain and scale applications via the command line interface, or through its optional GUI.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, January 2017

Honor 9 Lite review: Leader of the affordable Android pack

Filed under
Android
Reviews

As Huawei's budget brand, Honor handsets are well known for offering good value for money. With the Honor 9 Lite the 'good value' theme is raised a notch, thanks to an 18:9 aspect ratio 5.65-inch screen and no fewer than four cameras.

Judging by its name, you might expect the Honor 9 Lite to be a trimmed-down version of the Honor 9, but there are some significant variances that suggest the new handset is a step sideways rather than a step down.

The Honor 9's 5.15-inch 1,080-by-1,920 (16:9) screen is trumped here by a bigger, taller 5.65-inch 1,080-by-2,160 (18:9) display. There are also dual cameras front and back, whereas the Honor 9 only has dual rear cameras. At the time of writing the Honor 9 is selling for £349 (inc. VAT) direct from Honor, so the Honor 9 Lite's £199.99 looks very appealing.

Read more

Linux command history: Choosing what to remember and how

Filed under
Linux

Linux history – the record of commands that you’ve used on the command line – can simplify repeating commands and provide some very useful information when you’re trying to track down how recent system or account changes might have come about. Two things you need to understand before you begin your sleuthing, however, are that the shell’s command memory can be selective and that dates and times for when commands were run are optional.

Read more

Security: Voting Machines With Windows and Back Doors in Windows Help Crypto-jacking

Filed under
Security
  • Election Security a High Priority — Until It Comes to Paying for New Voting Machines [Ed: Sadly, the US has outsourced its voting machines to a private company whose systems are managed by Microsoft]

    When poll workers arrived at 6 a.m. to open the voting location in Allentown, New Jersey, for last November’s gubernatorial election, they found that none of the borough’s four voting machines were working. Their replacements, which were delivered about four hours later, also failed. Voters had to cast their ballots on paper, which then were counted by hand.

    Machine malfunctions are a regular feature of American elections. Even as worries over cybersecurity and election interference loom, many local jurisdictions depend on aging voting equipment based on frequently obsolete and sometimes insecure technology. And the counties and states that fund elections have dragged their heels on providing the money to buy new equipment.

  • Congress Can Act Right Now to Prevent Interference in the 2018 Elections [Ed: "confidence" is not security]

    To create that confidence the SAFE Act would: [...]

  • America’s Election Meddling Would Indeed Justify Other Countries Retaliating In Kind

    There is still no clear proof that the Russian government interfered with the 2016 U.S. election in any meaningful way. Which is weird, because Russia and every other country on earth would be perfectly justified in doing so.

  • NSA Exploit Now Powering Cryptocurrency Mining Malware [Ed: Microsoft Windows back door]

    You may have been asked if you'd like to try your hand at mining cryptocurrency. You may have demurred, citing the shortage in graphics cards or perhaps wary you were being coaxed into an elaborate Ponzi scheme. So much for opting out. Thanks to the NSA, you may be involved in mining cryptocurrency, but you're likely not seeing any of the benefits.

  • Cryptocurrency-mining criminals that netted $3 million gear up for more

    Separately, researchers from security firm FireEye said attackers, presumably with no relation to the one reported by Check Point, are exploiting unpatched systems running Oracle's WebLogic Server to install cryptocurrency-mining malware. Oracle patched the vulnerability, indexed as CVE-2017-10271, in October.

More Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Benchmarking Amazon EC2 Instances vs. Various Intel/AMD CPUs

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent performance changes following the Spectre/Meltdown CPU vulnerability mitigation and having just wrapped up some fresh CPU bare metal benchmarks as part of that testing as well as the recent AMD Raven Ridge launch, I've carried out a fresh round this week of benchmarks on various Amazon EC2 on-demand instance types compared to a number of bare metal Intel and AMD processors in looking at how the compute performance compares.

Read more

Graphics: Wine-Vulkan, Valve Work on Drivers, and Mesa 17.3.5 "Emergency Release"

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • New Wine-Vulkan Patches Are Under Review

    Roderick Colenbrander's Wine-Vulkan work for Vulkan infrastructure support under Wine has been updated and is ready for review, making these initial bits a candidate for soon being incorporated into mainline Wine.

    Roderick has spent the past few months on the Vulkan infrastructure for Wine as a Vulkan layer with ICD driver support rather than the older Vulkan library (non-ICD implementation) found in Wine-Staging.

  • Vulkan 1.0.69 Released With Fixes & New AMD Buffer Marker Extension

    While waiting to see what Khronos could have in store for GDC 2018 next month around Vulkan, today marks the Vulkan 1.0.69 point release availability.

    With Vulkan 1.0.68 having shipped in the middle of January, there are a fair amount of documentation improvements/fixes over the past month. As usual, addressing issues with the documentation reflects a majority of the changes for these point releases. Of the issues addressed in Vulkan 1.0.69, it's mostly a collection of over a dozen minor problems.

  • Vega Gets Its Last Fix For Dawn of War III On Linux With Vulkan

    Samuel Pitoiset of Valve has worked through the last of the Dawn of War 3 issues for Radeon Vega GPUs with the RADV Vulkan driver.

  • RadeonSI Now Offers NIR Shader Cache Support

    Earlier this month Valve Linux GPU driver developer Timothy Arceri landed NIR shader caching support within the Gallium3D Mesa state tracker as an alternative to the existing TGSI IR caching support. Arceri has now worked through implementing this NIR cache support for the RadeonSI driver.

  • mesa 17.3.5

    This is a emergency release fixing major a issue in the RADV driver.

  • Mesa 17.3.5 Released To Fix A RADV Bug

    While Mesa 17.3.4 was just released a few days ago with 90+ changes, Mesa 17.3.5 is now available as a quick follow-up release due to a serious bug.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Linux Domination and Bill Gates Domination

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Hackers Turn the Nintendo Switch into a Linux Tablet with KDE Plasma Desktop
  • Nintendo Switch has been hacked to run full-fat Linux

    The fail0verflow nerds got Linux running on the Switch by using code execution, though they didn't say how they got around Nintendo's own operating system and boot process to load up Linux.

  • Now Just Five Men Own Almost as Much Wealth as Half the World’s Population

    Why Do We Let Unqualified Rich People Tell Us How To Live? Especially Bill Gates!

    In 1975, at the age of 20, Bill Gates founded Microsoft with high school buddy Paul Allen. At the time Gary Kildall’s CP/M operating system was the industry standard. Even Gates’ company used it. But Kildall was an innovator, not a businessman, and when IBM came calling for an OS for the new IBM PC, his delays drove the big mainframe company to Gates. Even though the newly established Microsoft company couldn’t fill IBM’s needs, Gates and Allen saw an opportunity, and so they hurriedly bought the rights to another local company’s OS — which was based on Kildall’s CP/M system. Kildall wanted to sue, but intellectual property [sic] law for software had not yet been established. Kildall was a maker who got taken.

    So Bill Gates took from others to become the richest man in the world. And now, because of his great wealth and the meritocracy myth, MANY PEOPLE LOOK TO HIM FOR SOLUTIONS IN VITAL AREAS OF HUMAN NEED, such as education and global food production.

Devices/Embedded: ADL, Axiomtek, and FUD From Proprietary Embedded Software Firms

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Games: Deep Sixed, Lazy Galaxy, Gladiabots, Railway Empire, Hypergate, Total War Saga: Thrones of Britannia

Filed under
Gaming
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More in Tux Machines

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers