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Monday, 16 Jul 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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FSF/GNU: Alyssa Rosenzweig, Sonali Singhal, DataBasin + DataBasinKit 1.0

Filed under
GNU
  • Introducing Alyssa Rosenzweig, intern with the FSF tech team

    Howdy there, fellow cyber denizens; 'tis I, Alyssa Rosenzweig, your friendly local biological life form! I'm a certified goofball, licensed to be silly under the GPLv3, but more importantly, I'm passionate about free software's role in society. I'm excited to join the Free Software Foundation as an intern this summer to expand my understanding of our movement. Well, that, and purchasing my first propeller beanie in strict compliance with the FSF office dress code!

    Anywho, I hail from a family of engineers and was introduced to programming at an early age. As a miniature humanoid, I discovered that practice let me hit buttons on a keyboard and have my textual protagonist dance on my terminal -- that was cool! Mimicking those around me, I hacked with an Apple laptop, running macOS, compiling in Xcode, and talking on Skype. I was vaguely aware of the free software ethos, so sometimes I liberated my code. Sometimes I did not. I was little more than a button masher with a flashing TTY; I wrote video games while inside a video game, my life firewalled from reality.

  • Sonali's Progress on the Free Software Directory, weeks 1-2

    The last few weeks have been very enlightening. I learned about MediaWiki extensions, like MobileFrontend, CSS, vim, and other mobile extensions. I installed MobileFrontend, and resolved a few issues I faced regarding HeaderTabs and in-line view. It feels great to have been able to get the basic structure for mobile view by now.

    As a part of my project to make the Free Software Directory mobile friendly, I can add extensions, modify the code, and format the pages the way I like. I have complete freedom to experiment on their development site as much as I want. It's wonderful to be able to work on something I really enjoy under the guidance of experienced mentors.

  • DataBasin + DataBasinKit 1.0 released

    DataBasin is a tool to access and work with SalesForce.com. It allows to perform queries remotely, export and import data, inspect single records and describe objects. DataBasinKit is its underlying framework which implements the APIs in Objective-C. Works on GNUstep (major Unix variants and MinGW on windows) and natively on macOS.

A look at Ubuntu 18.04 Budgie

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

I like this. I like this a lot. It’s exactly what I’d been hoping it would be, after the previous failures at a happy Budgie desktop. I haven’t used it for long enough to get as deep into messing with it as I probably will in the future, so maybe I’ll find issues at that time; but Ubuntu 18.04 Budgie is seeming to be a quite solid, attractive, and easy to use system for people who want even more eyecandy, or are sick of the usual environments.

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KDE Applications 18.04 Reaches End of Life, KDE Apps 18.08 Coming August 16

Filed under
KDE

Coming about a five weeks after the release of the second maintenance update, the KDE Applications 18.04.3 point release is now available with a number of bug fixes, translation updates, and other improvements to make sure the open-source software suite offers users a stable and pleasant experience.

About 20 bug fixes have been recorded for KDE Applications 18.04.3 to improve applications like Ark, Cantor, Dolphin, Gwenview, JuK, Kate, KFind, KGPG, KMag, KMail, KNotes, Konsole, Kontact, Marble, and Okular, as well as numerous other core components. A full changelog is available here for your reading pleasure.

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Tiny carrier unleashes Nvidia Xavier power for robotics and AI

Filed under
Linux

Nvidia unveiled a Jetson Xavier Developer Kit for its octa-core, AI/robotics focused Xavier module. The carrier includes eSATA, PCIe x16, GbE, 2x USB 3.1 Type-C with DP support, and 2x M.2 slots with NVMe support.

As promised in early June when Nvidia announced its robotics and drone-oriented Isaac SDK for its Linux-driven Jetson Xavier computer-on-module, the company released the first details about the dev kit. The kit, which goes on sale for $1,300 in August, offers the first access to Xavier aside from the earlier Drive PX Pegasus autonomous car computer board, which incorporates up to 4x Xavier modules. The kit includes Xavier’s Linux-based stack and Isaac SDK.

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RaspAnd Project Now Lets You Run Android 8.1 Oreo on Raspberry Pi 3

Filed under
Android
Linux

While an experimental version, RaspAnd Build 180707 now lets you run the Android 8.1 Oreo mobile operating system on your tiny Raspberry Pi 3 Model B single-board computer. It includes Google Play Services, Google Play store, and Google Play Game via GAPPS, YouTube, Spotify 4.6, Jelly Browser, TeamViewer, Aptoide TV, ES File Explorer 4.1.7.2, 8) AIDA64, Termux 0.60, and Quick Reboot Pro 1.8.4.

And the good news is that it's free if you have a previous RaspAnd version. Yes, you can download RaspAnd Build 180707 for free right now and install it on your Raspberry Pi 3 Model B computer. However, please note that the newer Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ model is not yet supported by RaspAnd. Also, it looks like this build isn't working with most monitors and TV screens, but it supports the official Raspberry Pi 7-inch touchscreen though.

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SBC Clusters — Beyond Raspberry Pi

Filed under
Linux

Cluster computers constructed of Raspberry Pi SBCs have been around for years, ranging from supercomputer-like behemoths to simple hobbyist rigs. More recently, we’ve seen cluster designs that use other open-spec hacker boards, many of which offer higher computer power and faster networking at the same or lower price. Farther below, we’ll examine one recent open source design from Paul Smith at Climbers.net that combines 12 octa-core NanoPi-Fire3 SBCs for a 96-core cluster.

SBC-based clusters primarily fill the needs of computer researchers who find it too expensive to book time on a server-based HPC (high performance computing) cluster. Large-scale HPC clusters are in such high demand, that it’s hard to find available cluster time in the first place.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Red Hat Leftovers: Red Hat Summit, OpenShift, Fedora App

Filed under
Red Hat

Mozilla: Languages, New Features in Firefox Focus and Red Hat's E-mail Poll

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Localization, Translation, and Machines

    Now that’s rule-based, and it’d be tedious to maintain these rules. Neural Machine Translation (NMT) has all the buzz now, and Machine Learning in general. There is plenty of research that improves how NMT systems learn about the context of the sentence they’re translating. But that’s all text.

    It’d be awesome if we could bring Software Analysis into the mix, and train NMT to localize software instead of translating fragments.

    For Firefox, could one train on English and localized DOM? For Android’s XML layout, a similar approach could work? For projects with automated screenshots, could one train on those? Is there enough software out there to successfully train a neural network?

  • New Features in Firefox Focus for iOS, Android – now also on the BlackBerry Key2

    Since the launch of Firefox Focus as a content blocker for iOS in December 2015, we’ve continuously improved the now standalone browser for Apple and Android while always being mindful of users’ requests and suggestions. We analyze app store reviews and evaluate regularly which new features make our privacy browser even more user-friendly, efficient and secure. Today’s update for iOS and Android adds functionality to further simplify accessing information on the web. And we are happy to make Focus for Android available to a new group: BlackBerry Key2 users.

  • Which email client do you prefer? [Ed: Thunderbird is probably still the best one around and it’s good that Mozilla hired people to maintain/develop it.]

    Email's decentralized nature makes it a fundamental part of the free and open internet. And because of this, there are a ton of clients to choose from, including several great open source choices. We've compiled lists of some of our favorites.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Who Are the Leaders in Open Source Software for IoT Application Development?

    Which vendors lead in open source IoT development tools? Our RTInsights survey looks at the intersection of IoT, dev tools, and open source software.

    The role of open source software (OSS) in IoT application development is unmistakable. But who are the vendors that enterprises look to for open source IoT development tools? We decided to find out with a survey that looked at the intersection of IoT, developer tools, and open source software (see “Research Objectives and Methodology,” below, for details on the 2017 Worldwide IoT Innovation Survey, conducted by RTInsights).

  • Google Releases Open Source Tool That Checks Postgres Backup Integrity

    Google has released a new open-source tool for verifying PostgreSQL (Postgres) database backups. 

    Enterprises using the PostgresSQL can use the tool to verify if any data corruption or data loss has occurred when backing up their database.  Google is already using the tool for customers of Google Cloud SQL for Postgres. Starting this week, it is now also available as open source code. 

    Brett Hesterberg, product manager at Google's cloud unit and Alexis Guajardo, a senior software engineer at the company described the new feature as a command line tool that administrators can execute against a Postgres database.

  • OpenBSD gains Wi-Fi "auto-join"

    In a change which is bound to be welcomed widely, -current has gained "auto-join" for Wi-Fi networks. Peter Hessler (phessler@) has been working on this for quite some time and he wrote about it in his p2k18 hackathon report.

  • OpenBSD Finally Has The Ability To Auto-Join WiFi Networks

    Granted OpenBSD isn't the most desktop focused BSD out there and that WiFi isn't therefore the highest priority for this security-focused operating system, but with the latest code it can now finally auto-join WiFi networks.

  • Best Practices for Open Source Governance [Ed: WhiteSource neglects to say that: 1) proprietary software is the problem here (make it FOSS and problem gone); 2) proprietary software poses greater compliance threats]

Security: Updates, DOD and Red Hat on "Security Hardening Rules"

Filed under
Red Hat
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Year-old router bug exploited to steal sensitive DOD drone, tank documents

     

    In May, a hacker perusing vulnerable systems with the Shodan search engine found a Netgear router with a known vulnerability—and came away with the contents of a US Air Force captain's computer. The purloined files from the captain—the officer in charge (OIC) of the 432d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron's MQ-9 Reaper Aircraft Maintenance Unit (AMU)at Creech Air Force Base, Nevada—included export-controlled information regarding Reaper drone maintenance.

  • Security Hardening Rules

    Many users of Red Hat Insights are familiar with the security rules we create to alert them about security vulnerabilities on their system, especially concerning high-profile issues such as Spectre/Meltdown or Heartbleed. In this post, I'd like to talk about the other category of security related rules, those related to security hardening.

    In all of the products we ship, we make a concerted effort to ship thoughtful, secure default settings to minimize the amount of configuration needed to do the work you want to do. With complex packages such as Apache httpd, however, every installation will require some degree of customization before it's ready for deployment to production, and with more complex configurations, there's a chance that a setting or the interaction between several settings can have security implications which aren't immediately evident. Additionally, sometimes systems are configured in a manner that aids rapid development, but those configurations aren't suitable for production environments.

    With our hardening rules, we detect some of the most common security-related configuration issues and provide context to help you understand the represented risks, as well as recommendations on how to remediate the issues.

The NVIDIA/AMD Linux GPU Gaming Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Dollar For July 2018

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

In part with GPU demand by crypto-currency miners waning a bit, NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics card availability at retailers has been improving in recent weeks as well as seeing less inflated prices than just recently had been the case. Given the better availability and stabilizing prices, here is a fresh look of the current line-up of GeForce and Radeon graphics cards under Ubuntu Linux using the newest AMD/NVIDIA drivers and also providing performance-per-dollar metrics given current retail prices.

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Ubuntu: Demystifying Snap Confinement, 'Minimal', “Ubuntu Is Everywhere”, and Ubuntu Podcast

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Demystifying Snap Confinement

    Snaps introduce some new concepts to the Linux ecosystem which developers can take advantage of, and snap users need to appreciate. When installing a snap, it’s important to understand what parts of the system the application wants access to. It’s up to the user to decide to install (or not) a snap, and the confinement model empowers the user in the decision making process.

  • Canonical releases Minimal Ubuntu for servers, containers and the cloud

    There's a new version of Ubuntu on the block -- Ubuntu Minimal. It's been stripped right back to the bone to leave a tiny footprint, and these back Linux distros should boot 40 percent faster than a standard Ubuntu server image. Despite the reduced footprint size, Ubuntu Minimal retains all of Ubuntu's standard tools (such as ssh, apt and snapd) and maintain full compatibility.

    Designed for cloud developers and ops, Canonical says that the release is intended for completely automated operations, and as such much of the user-friendliness has been stripped out, but it's still ideal for used in KVM, Google Computer Engine and AWS.

  • This Infographic From Canonical Shows “Ubuntu Is Everywhere”

    Microsoft Windows owns the lion’s share in the operating system market, but at the same time, we cannot deny the presence of Linux. The fact that Linux Ubuntu powers Netflix, Snapchat, Dropbox, Uber, Tesla, and International Space Station is enough to prove the might of the opensource kernel.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E18 – Eighteen Summers - Ubuntu Podcast

GNOME: GTK+ 4.0, GUADEC, Fedora Atomic Workstation, and Pitivi @ GSoC

Filed under
GNOME
  • GTK+ 4.0 Likely Being Released In Spring Of 2019

    While the GTK+ 4.0 tool-kit was previously talked about for release by the end of 2018, that's now looking more like spring of 2019 when this next major version will be released.

    Happening the past week was the GUADEC 2018 GNOME developer conference and now the GTK+ team has put out their notes from the planning and discussions that happened pertaining to the next major version of the tool-kit.

    In case you missed the recent GTK news, a GTK+ 3.24 minor feature update release is being planned for this fall alongside GNOME 3.30. GTK+ 3.24 will serve as an interim release until GTK+ 4.0 is available and adopted.

  • A report from the Guadec GTK+ BoF

    The GTK+ team had a full day planning session during the BoF days at Guadec, and we had a full room, including representatives from several downstreams, not just GNOME.

  • Writing docs in a container

    In February, Matthias Clasen started a series of blog posts about Fedora Atomic Workstation (now Team Silverblue) and Flatpak. I gave it a try to see how the container would work with the documentation tools.

    The screenshot below shows the setup I used to submit this merge request. The buildah container is in the shell window on the right where git and Emacs operate in the /srv directory. At the same time on the Silverblue desktop, gitg and Yelp see the same files in the /var/srv directory.

  • Welcome Window Integration in Pitivi – Part 3

    In my last post (link), I talked about Pitivi finally getting a Welcome window. In this window, the layout of the recent projects list was pretty basic – we were only showing the name of the projects.

Linux Kernel: VKMS, CAKE, Xen and AMDVLK

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Virtual Kernel Mode-Setting Driver Being Added To Linux 4.19

    Linux 4.19 is shaping up to be a pretty exciting kernel release for what is expected to be the last version before Linux 5.0.

    Adding to the list of Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) improvements in Linux 4.19, VKMS has been added to Linux 4.19. The VKMS driver is the virtual kernel mode-setting effort, most recently worked on as part of this year's Google Summer of Code.

    The virtual KMS driver is a basic KMS driver exposing a CRTC/encoder/connector/plane that can be used for headless machines to run an X.Org Server or even Wayland and serves for virtual display purposes without necessa

  • Networking CAKE Is Ready For Tasting With Linux 4.19

    For those maintaining their own home-built Linux router, Linux 4.19 is going to be pretty exciting: CAKE Qdisc has been merged into net-next, making it a feature for this next kernel cycle.

  • Latest Xen Hypervisor Arrives Late, but Greatly Improved
  • AMDVLK Vulkan Driver Now Supports Direct Display Mode For VR HMDs

    The AMDVLK open-source Radeon Vulkan Linux driver has seen its latest weekly code drop that brings with it some of the extensions needed for supporting the Steam VR experience.

    The AMDVLK driver now supports VK_EXT_direct_mode_display and VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extensions. These extensions are needed so a Vulkan application/compositor can take exclusive control of display(s), such as the use-case for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs) with being controlled by the SteamVR compositor. The VK_EXT_acquire_xlib_display extension is needed for acquiring control of a display that is associated with an X11 screen from the X.Org Server.

Teleconsole – Share Your Linux Terminal with Your Friends

Filed under
Software

Teleconsole is a free open source and powerful command line tool for sharing your Linux terminal session with people you trust. Your friends or team members can connect to your Linux terminal session via a command-line over SSH or via a browser over HTTPS protocol.

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MellowPlayer Integrates Music Streaming Services With Your Desktop (Cross-Platform)

Filed under
Software

The application was updated to version 3.4.0 a few days ago, receiving some important enhancements, like support for Yandex Music, and a settings page for each plugin. Only the YouTube plugin currently has its own service-dependent settings right now, which allow you to set the app to automatically mute and skip ads.

Google Play Music was also enhanced with favorites and seeking support, and the Spotify integration was fixed.

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Games: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • The new Counter-Strike: Global Offensive Panorama UI is now available on Linux

    After waiting for a bit of extra time, Linux gamers can now enjoy the brand new Panorama UI update in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive.

    To activate it, you need to add "-panorama" as a launch option on Steam. Simply right right on the game in your Steam library, hit properties and then hit the set launch options button and paste it in there.

  • Action racing game 'Road Redemption' updated with improved physics

    Annoyingly, they messed up the executable naming for the Linux & Mac versions. You can launch it directly from the installed folder, but not from Steam directly until they fix this. Sadly, that means the Steam Controller doesn't work as a gamepad, even when using SC Controller the buttons were all messed up so it's keyboard only until they fix it up.

  • Fallout inspired ATOM RPG has another sizeable update

    ATOM RPG, the rough but very promising Fallout inspired game has another sizeable update that's live on Steam.

  • Kalypso Media buy the rights to the Commandos IP, a new game is coming plus updates to older titles

    Kalypso Media now officially own the rights to the Commandos IP which could mean good things for Linux gamers.

    Kalypso Media have been pretty good to Linux gamers in recent years, with them publishing Linux titles like Sudden Strike 4, Railway Empire, Dungeons 3, Tropico 6 (coming soon) and plenty more.

  • Valve have revamped the Upcoming Releases section on Steam

    Valve are continuing their Steam store updated, with the latest section to get a makeover being the Upcoming games section.

    Originally, it was a very basic list of all games to be released on Steam for whatever platform you had selected to view. Instead, it's now a "Popular Upcoming" list that takes into account pre-release interest in a game using wishlists and other data.

  • Twin-stick shooter 'NeuroVoider' is now on GOG

    Flying Oak Games first title NeuroVoider is an action packed twin-stick shooter RPG and it's now available DRM free on GOG.

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More in Tux Machines

Licensing With GPL: Greater Certainty

  • A Movement Builds as a Diverse Group of 14 Additional Leaders Seek Greater Predictability in Open Source Licensing
    Today’s announcement demonstrates the expanded breadth and depth of support for the GPL Cooperation Commitment. Companies adopting the commitment now span geographic regions, include eight Fortune 100 companies, and represent a wide range of industries from enterprise software and hardware to consumer electronics, chip manufacturing to cloud computing, and social networking to automotive. The companies making the commitment represent more than 39 percent of corporate contributions to the Linux kernel, including six of the top 10 corporate contributors.1
  • ARM: Arm joins industry leaders in commitment to fair enforcement of open source licenses
    Today, Red Hat announced that several leading technology companies, including Arm, are joining a diverse coalition of organizations that have come together to promote greater predictability in open source license enforcement. Alongside Amazon, Canonical, Linaro, Toyota, VMware and many others we have committed to ensure fair opportunity for our licensees to correct errors in compliance with their GPL and LGPL licensed software before taking action to terminate the licenses.
  • Debian "stretch" 9.5 Update Now Available, Red Hat Announces New Adopters of the GPL Cooperation Commitment, Linux Audio Conference 2018 Videos Now Available, Latte Dock v0.8 Released and More
    Red Hat announced that 14 additional companies have adopted the GPL Cooperation Commitment, which means that "more than 39 percent of corporate contributions to the Linux kernel, including six of the top 10 contributors" are now represented. According to the Red Hat press release, these commitments "reflect the belief that responsible compliance in open source licensing is important and that license enforcement in the open source ecosystem operates by different norms." Companies joining the growing movement include Amazon, Arm, Canonical, GitLab, Intel Corporation, Liferay, Linaro, MariaDB, NEC, Pivotal, Royal Philips, SAS, Toyota and VMware.

Opinion: GitHub vs GitLab

So, Microsoft bought GitHub, and many people are confused or worried. It's not a new phenomenon when any large company buys any smaller company, and people are right to be worried, although I argue that their timing is wrong. Like Microsoft, GitHub has made some useful contributions to free and open-source software, but let's not forget that GitHub's main product is proprietary software. And, it's not just some innocuous web service either; GitHub makes and sells a proprietary software package you can download and run on your own server called GitHub Enterprise (GHE). Let's remember how we got here. BitMover made a tool called BitKeeper, a proprietary version control system that allowed free-of-charge licenses to free software projects. In 2002, the Linux kernel switched to using BitKeeper for its version control, although some notable developers made the noble choice to refuse to use the proprietary program. Many others did not, and for a number of years, kernel development was hampered by BitKeeper's restrictive noncommercial licenses. In 2005, Andrew Tridgell, working at OSDL, developed a client that bypassed this restriction, and as a result, BitMover removed licenses to BitKeeper from all OSDL employees—including Linus Torvalds. Eventually, all non-commercial licenses were stopped, and new licenses included clauses preventing the development of alternative version control systems. As a result of this, two new projects were born: Mercurial and Git. Created in a few short weeks in 2005, Git quickly became the version control system for Linux development. Proprietary version control tools aren't common in free software development, but proprietary collaboration websites have been around for some time. One of the earliest collaboration websites still around today is Sourceforge. Sourceforge was created in the late 1990s by VA Software, and the code behind the project was released in 2000. Read more

Comparing Latencies and Power consumption with various CPU schedulers

The low-latency kernel offering with Ubuntu provides a kernel tuned for low-latency environments using low-latency kernel configuration options. The x86 kernels by default run with the Intel-Pstate CPU scheduler set to run with the powersave scaling governor biased towards power efficiency. While power efficiency is fine for most use-cases, it can introduce latencies due to the fact that the CPU can be running at a low frequency to save power and also switching from a deep C state when idle to a higher C state when servicing an event can also increase on latencies. Read more

csplit: A Better Way to Split File in Linux Based on its Content

Learn some practical examples of the GNU coreutils csplit command for splitting files in Linux. It’s more useful than the popular split command. Read more