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Friday, 17 Aug 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Titlesort icon Author Replies Last Post
Story 5 open source tools for taming text Roy Schestowitz 09/07/2015 - 12:04pm
Story 5 specialized Linux distributions for computer repair Rianne Schestowitz 26/02/2015 - 1:05am
Story 5 tips every open source project manager should consider Roy Schestowitz 24/03/2016 - 10:25am
Story 6 essential non-coding careers in open source Roy Schestowitz 01/03/2016 - 10:40am
Story 6 new things Fedora 21 brings to the open source cloud Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 10:02am
Story 6 tips for adopting open source Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:02pm
Story 7 local governments announced to build with Code for America Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 4:11pm
Story 8 ways to contribute to open source without writing code Roy Schestowitz 01/12/2014 - 10:16pm
Story 9 reasons to use KDE Roy Schestowitz 14/04/2015 - 2:31pm
Story A beautiful, super-thin laptop that makes Fedora shine Roy Schestowitz 14/08/2015 - 11:33am

Linux 4.19 Work and Linux Foundation Expansion

Filed under
Linux
  • EXT4 & XFS File-System Updates Submitted For Linux 4.19

    The pull requests updating the XFS and EXT4 file-system driver code have been sent in for the recently started Linux 4.19 kernel merge window.

    On the EXT4 file-system front, the documentation on the project's Wiki has been converted into documentation files within the kernel tree. Additionally, there is now 64-bit timestamp support for EXT4's superblock fields, a Spectre gadget fix, hardening against maliciously corrupted file-systems, and various other bug fixes and code improvements.

  • Linux 4.19 Will Fend Off Stack Attacks With STACKLEAK Plugin

    As expected, Linux 4.19 is getting STACKLEAK as a GCC plug-in for the Linux kernel that will fend off various form of stack attacks.

    STACKLEAK is ported from the last open-source code of the GrSecurity/PaX modified kernel and wipes out the kernel stack before returning from system calls.

  • Open Source cleaning up at the Oscars

    Over the last 25 years, software, and particularly open source software (OSS), has played an increasingly important role in the most successful movies of our time.

    Now this contribution is set to grow, boosted by the introduction on Friday, of the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), a joint venture of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences - the organisation behind the annual Oscar awards and the Linux Foundation.

    This follows a recently concluded two-year investigation by the Academy which found that more than 80% of the motion picture industry uses OSS, particularly for animation and visual effects.

  • AMPAS, Linux Foundation Launch Academy Software Foundation

    “Developers and engineers across the industry are constantly working to find new ways to bring images to life, and open source enables them to start with a solid foundation while focusing on solving unique, creative challenges rather than reinventing the wheel,” said Rob Bredow, SVP, Executive Creative Director and Head of Industrial Light & Magic and Member of the Academy’s Science and Technology Council, Open Source Investigation Committee. “We are very excited to launch the Academy Software Foundation and provide a home for open source developers to collaborate, regardless of where they work, and share best practices which we believe will drive innovation across the industry.”

  • The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation Launched the Academy Software Foundation, Linux 4.18 and GNU Linux-libre 4.18-gnu Kernels Are Out, DXVK 0.65 Released and Canonical Live Patch Update

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and The Linux Foundation launched the Academy Software Foundation late last week. The ASF's mission is to "increase the quality and quantity of contributions to the content creation industry's open source software base; to provide a neutral forum to coordinate cross-project efforts; to provide a common build and test infrastructure; and to provide individuals and organizations a clear path to participation in advancing our open source ecosystem". Interested developers can sign up to join the mailing list here.

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat
  • Red Hat’s Adam Clater Provides Recommendations for DevSecOps Practices in Government

    Adam Clater, chief architect for Red Hat’s North American public sector, has said there is a need for federal agencies to accept the integration of security in software development processes as a cultural change, MeriTalk reported Monday.

    Clater believes it is important that agency managers grasp the need to standardize their way of creating software systems to add stability and security in development and operations or DevOps practices, leading to a new concept called DevSecOps.

    The Red Hat official told agency managers to begin with undertaking easy and uncomplicated steps to determine how they should adapt to DevSecOps.

  • Could your team be managing itself?

    I was engaged recently in a passionate conversation ignited by a simple comment: "A team has to be managed." The comment made me think I wasn't on the same page as my interlocutor.

    I was discussing the importance of designing organizational roles that won't become bottlenecks (roles that won't prevent the organization from delivering efficiently or to adapting quickly to changes). In classic organization design, we tend to think that designing boxes on an organizational chart and putting great people in charge will solve all our problems. That approach could work in static environments, where what you have to deliver is defined once and for all.

  • Improving rsync performance with GlusterFS

    Rsync is a particularly tough workload for GlusterFS because with its defaults, it exercises some of the worst case operations for GlusterFS. GlusterFS is the core of Red Hat Gluster’s scale-out storage solution. Gluster is an open, software-defined storage (SDS) platform that is designed to scale out to handle data intensive tasks across many servers in physical, virtual, or cloud deployments. Since GlusterFS is a POSIX compatible distributed file system, getting the best performance from rsync requires some tuning/tweaking on both sides.

    In this post, I will go through some of the pain points and the different tunables for working around the pain points. Getting rsync to run as fast on GlusterFS as it would on a local file system is not really feasible given its architecture, but below I describe how to get as close as possible.

  • Advice For New Leaders From The CEO Of Red Hat
  • Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT) Holdings Boosted by Atria Investments LLC
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) is Westbourne Investment Advisors Inc.’s 9th Largest Position

FreeBSD 12.0 Alpha Hits The Web

Filed under
BSD

The first alpha release of FreeBSD 12.0 was quietly uploaded a few days ago to the project's download servers as the first step to shipping this next major update to the FreeBSD operating system.

FreeBSD 12.0-ALPHA1 was successfully made back on 10 August as what begins the project's "code slush" period whereby new commits can continue being merged for 12.0 but they shouldn't be introducing new features. The actual code freeze is what's beginning later this month followed by the code branching and then the beta releases start towards the end of September.

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Also: Badness, Enumerated by Robots

Software: HTTP Stuff, Blender, Browsh, Chronos Timetracker and DaVinci Resolve 15

Filed under
Software
  • HTTP request routing and validation with gorilla/mux

    The Go networking library includes the http.ServeMux structure type, which supports HTTP request multiplexing (routing): A web server routes an HTTP request for a hosted resource, with a URI such as /sales4today, to a code handler; the handler performs the appropriate logic before sending an HTTP response, typically an HTML page.

  • Blender 2.8 Alpha 2 Just Released, but Full Release Pushed to Early 2019

    The free and open-source Blender 3D modeling software, a popular alternative to more expensive suites like Maya LT and 3DS Max, is facing a bit of a delay in their release schedule for Blender 2.80 – however, the developers intend to release it by early next year 2019.

    The devs had hoped to have a feature complete beta ready this August 2018, but that doesn’t look like a possibility either – the team spent most of their time “improving” the currently existing features, and eliminating current bugs within the software. However, a Blender 2.80 Alpha 2 was released just today.

  • Browsh – A Modern Text Browser That Play Videos and Everything

    Browsh is an open source, simple and modern text-based browser that renders in TTY terminal environments. It is made up of a minimal Golang CLI front-end and a browser web-extension (headless Firefox) which actually offers most of the functionality to create a purely text-based version of web pages and web apps.

    This browser renders anything that a modern browser can; HTML5, CSS3, JS, video as well as WebGL. It is importantly a bandwidth-saver, designed to run on a remote server and accessed via SSH/Mosh or the in-browser HTML service so as to notably reduce bandwidth.

  • Chronos Timetracker – An Open-Source Desktop Client for JIRA

    JIRA is an Agile-based management tool that provides developers, designers, and team members with bug tracking, issue tracking, and other project management functions including customizing workflows, collaborating with external teams, and releasing software.

  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Released for RedHat Enterprise and CentOS Systems

    Video editing on Linux platform just got a whole lot easier, as Blackmagic Design just released their long-awaited DaVinci Resolve 15 software update – a free to use professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software suite.

  • Professional Video Editor DaVinci Resolve 15 Stable Released

    DaVinci Resolve 15 stable has been released for Linux, Windows, and macOS. The new release brings native audio support on Linux and a long list of new features and improvements.

    DaVinci Resolve is a professional video and effects editor. The tool, which can be used for editing, color correction, audio post production and visual effects, has two versions: free to use and paid (DaVinci Resolve Studio).

    The free to use version does not support h26x so you'll need to transcode any such clips before using them in DaVinci resolve. DaVinci Resolve 15 Studio costs $299 and it includes multi-user collaboration features along with 3D tools, dozens of Resolve FX and more.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

MPV Player: A Minimalist Video Player for Linux

Filed under
Software

MPV is an open source, cross platform video player that comes with a minimalist GUI and feature rich command line version.
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GSoC Projects Under GNU's Umbrella: GNUnet and Guix

Filed under
GNU
Google
OSS
  • GSoC 2018 - GNUnet Web-based User Interface

    In the context of Google Summer of Code 2018, my mentor (Martin Schanzenbach) and I have worked on creating and extending the REST API of GNUnet. Currently, we mirrored the functionality of following commands:

    gnunet-identity
    gnunet-namestore
    gnunet-gns
    gnunet-peerinfo

    Additionally, we developed a website with the Javascript framework Angular 6 and the design framework iotaCSS to use the new REST API. The REST API of GNUnet is now documented with Sphinx.

  • GSoC 2018 report: Cuirass Web interface

    For the last three months I have been working with the Guix team as a Google Summer of Code intern. The title of my project is "GNU Guix (Cuirass): Adding a web interface similar to the Hydra web interface".

    Cuirass is a continuous integration system which monitors the Guix git repository, schedules builds of Guix packages, and presents the build status of all Guix packages. Before my project, Cuirass did not have a web interface. The goal of the project was to implement an interface for Cuirass which would allow a user to view the overall build progress, details about evaluations, build failures, etc. The web interface of Hydra is a good example of such a tool.

    In this post, I present a final report on the project. The Cuirass repository with the changes made during the project is located at http://git.savannah.gnu.org/cgit/guix/guix-cuirass.git. A working instance of the implemented interface is available at https://berlin.guixsd.org/. You can find more examples and demonstrations of the achieved results below.

Programming: Rust, Top Languages and Studying Developers

Filed under
Development
  • [Rust] Diagnosing A Weak Memory Ordering Bug

    For the first time in my life I tracked a real bug's root cause to incorrect usage of weak memory orderings. Until now weak memory bugs were something I knew about but had subconciously felt were only relevant to wizards coding on big iron, partly because until recently I've spent most of my career using desktop x86 machines.

    Under heavy load a Pernosco service would assert in Rust's std::thread::Thread::unpark() with the error "inconsistent state in unpark". Inspecting the code led to the disturbing conclusion that the only way to trigger this assertion was memory corruption; the value of self.inner.state should always be between 0 and 2 inclusive, and if so then we shouldn't be able to reach the panic. The problem was nondeterministic but I was able to extract a test workload that reproduced the bug every few minutes. I tried recording it in rr chaos mode but was unable to reproduce it there (which is not surprising in hindsight since rr imposes sequential consistency).

  • IEEE Survey Ranks Programming Languages

    It's been said that programming languages are akin to religion. Engineers and developers will go out of their way to defend the use of their favorite language. (Perhaps it's more the pain of learning a new language that keeps us using the old). Surely you've seen many surveys on programming language preferences. As with all surveys, the results depend on who was asked.

  • Programming Languages May Finally Be Reaching a Status Quo

    The analyst firm RedMonk has tracked programmers' interest in various programming languages since 2011. During that time, Swift and Kotlin grew faster than any other language the firm tracked, including Google's Go and Mozilla's Rust. Earlier this year Swift, which Apple released in 2014, managed to tie with Apple's much more established Objective-C language for tenth place in RedMonk's rankings.

  • Machine learning algorithms can identify anonymous programmers

    Rachel Greenstadt, associate professor of computer science at Drexel University, and Aylin Caliskan, an assistant professor at George Washington University, have found that code can be a form of stylistic expression, a bit like writing, reported Wired.

    As such, the researchers developed a machine learning algorithm to recognise the coding structure used by individual programmers based on samples of their work and spot their traits in compiled binaries or raw source code.

Microsoft and Apple Piggybacking the Competition

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

Automating backups on a Raspberry Pi NAS

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In the first part of this three-part series using a Raspberry Pi for network-attached storage (NAS), we covered the fundamentals of the NAS setup, attached two 1TB hard drives (one for data and one for backups), and mounted the data drive on a remote device via the network filesystem (NFS). In part two, we will look at automating backups. Automated backups allow you to continually secure your data and recover from a hardware defect or accidental file removal.

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5 open source strategy and simulation games for Linux

Filed under
Linux
OSS
Gaming

Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but those games are often not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

So, can someone who only uses free and open source software find games that are polished enough to present a solid gaming experience without compromising their open source ideals? Absolutely. While open source games are unlikely ever to rival some of the AAA commercial games developed with massive budgets, there are plenty of open source games, in many genres, that are fun to play and can be installed from the repositories of most major Linux distributions. Even if a particular game is not packaged for a particular distribution, it is usually easy to download the game from the project's website to install and play it.

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Software: Virtlyst 1.2.0, Blender 2.8 Plan, Dropbox Gets Worse and DaVinci Resolve 15 Targets GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software
  • Virtlyst 1.2.0 released

    Virtlyst – a Web Interface to manage virtual machines build with Cutelyst/Qt/C++ got a new release.

    This new release includes a bunch of bug fixes, most importantly probably being the ability to warn user before doing important actions to help avoid doing mistakes.

    Most commits came from new contributor René Linder who is also working on a Bootstrap 4 theme and Lukas Steiner created a dockerfile for it. This is especially cool because Virtlyst repository now has 4 authors while Cutelyst which is way older has only 6.

  • Blender 2.8 Planning Update

    At this point we will not have a feature complete Beta release ready in August as we had hoped. Instead, we invested most of our time improving the features that were already there and catching up with the bug tracker. This includes making the viewport and EEVEE work on more graphics cards and platforms.

    The Spring open movie team is also using Blender 2.8 in production, which is helping us ensure the new dependency graph and tools can handle complex production scenes.

  • Blender 2.80 Now Coming In Early 2019 With Many Improvements

    The Blender 3D modeling software is facing a slight set-back in their release schedule for the big Blender 2.80 release, but it's moving along and they intend to have it ready by early next year.

  • Dropbox will only Support the Ext4 File System In Linux in November

    Dropbox has announced that starting on November 7th 2018, only the ext4 file system will be supported in Linux for synchronizing folders in the Dropbox desktop app. Those Linux users who have synch on other file systems such as XFS, ext2, ext3, ZFS, and many others will no longer have working Dropbox synchronization after this date.

    This news came out after Linux dropbox users began seeing notifications stating "Dropbox Will Stop Syncing Ext4 File Systems in November." You can see an example of this alert in Swedish below.

  • Dropbox scares users by shrinking synching options

    Dropbox has quietly announced it will soon stop synching files that reside on drives tended by some filesystems.

    The sync ‘n’ share service’s desktop client has recently produced warnings that the software will stop syncing in November 2018.

    Those warnings were sufficiently ambiguous that Dropbox took to its support forums to explain exactly what’s going on, namely that as of November 7th, 2018, “we’re ending support for Dropbox syncing to drives with certain uncommon file systems.”

  • DaVinci Resolve 15 Video/Effects Editor Released With Linux Support

    DaVinci Resolve 15 has been released by Blackmagic Design as the company's professional-grade video editing, visual effects, motion graphics, and audio post-production software.

How to display data in a human-friendly way on Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Not everyone thinks in binary or wants to mentally insert commas into large numbers to come to grips with the sizes of their files. So, it's not surprising that Linux commands have evolved over several decades to incorporate more human-friendly ways of displaying information to its users. In today’s post, we look at some of the options provided by various commands that make digesting data just a little easier.

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KDE and GNOME GSoC: Falkon, WikiToLearn, Nautilus and Pitivi

Filed under
KDE
Google
GNOME
  • The Joy of GSoC Smile

    Wooo... this is the last day of coding phase of GSoC. I am writing this blog to share my experience and work done in the coding phase. I want to specially thank my mentor David Rosca for his help, suggestions and reviews. This was my first exposure to the KDE community and I am proud that it was great. I really enjoyed the whole program from proposal submission - intermediate evals - then now this final evaluation. Also, I had learned a lot working on my project. Frankly speaking, I didn't knew about i18n and l10n much but with the help of my mentor now I have a quite good understanding of how these works and are implemented. I can truly say this was one of my best summer vacations.

  • What’s next for WikiToLearn?

    Google Summer of Code is finishing and many things have been done on WikiToLearn since previous post. A little recap is needed.

    Talking with mentors has been crucial because they told me to focus on finishing CRUD interaction with API backend instead of working on “history mode” viewer.

  • GSoC 2018 Final Evaluation

    As GSoC is coming to an end, I am required to put my work altogether in order for it to be easily available and hopefully help fellow/potential contributors work on their own projects. 

    [...]

    At its prestige, through this project we will have tests both for most critical and used operations of Nautilus, and for the search engines we use. Further on, I’ll provide links for all of my merge requests and dwell a bit on their ins and outs while posting links to my commits:

  • GTK+ 4 and Nautilus </GSoC>

    Another summer here at GNOME HQ comes to an end. While certainly eventful, it unfortunately did not result in a production-ready Nautilus port to GTK+ 4 (unless you don’t intend to use the location entry or any other entry, but more on that later).

  • Pitivi Video Editor Gains UI Polish, Video Preview Resizing

    The latest Google Summer of Code 2018 is allowing some excellent work to be done on some excellent open source projects.

    Among them Pitivi, the non-linear video editor built using GTK and Gstreamer and offering up a basic video editing feature set.

    Over the past few months, Harish Fulara, a Computer Science student, has worked on improving the application’s greeter dialog and on adding support dynamic resizing of the video preview box.

Security: OpenPGP, Oracle, DEFCON, Faxploit

Filed under
Security
  • OpenPGP key expiration is not a security measure

    There seems to be some recurring confusion among Gentoo developers regarding the topic of OpenPGP key expiration dates. Some developers seem to believe them to be some kind of security measure — and start arguing about its weaknesses. Furthermore, some people seem to think of it as rotation mechanism, and believe that they are expected to generate new keys. The truth is, expiration date is neither of those.

  • Vulnerability in Java VM Component of Oracle Database allows for Whole System Compromise
  • #DEFCON Vote Hacking Village Refute NASS 'Unfair' Claims

    DEFCON has hit back at criticisms levied at it by the National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) over the introduction of an area designed to test voting machines.

    In a statement released on 9th August, the NASS said that while it applauded “the goal of DEFCON attendees to find and report vulnerabilities in election systems" it felt it was important to point out that work has been done by states' own information technology teams, and also named the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Elections Infrastructure Information Sharing and Analysis Center (EI-ISAC), the private sector, the National Guard and universities as being involved “to enhance and reinforce their cyber postures with penetration testing, risk and vulnerability assessments and many other tools.”

  • How to hack an election, according to a former NSA hacker

    As we find out more about Russia's interference in the 2016 United States presidential election, former NSA hacker and TrustedSec CEO David Kennedy reveals what it would take to hack an election. Kennedy also reveals how France was able to protect themselves. Following is a transcript of the video.

    David Kennedy: What's interesting with the election systems is that as they become more and more electronic, and people can use computer systems to actively go in and cast your votes at the actual ballots, those are all susceptible to attack.

    What the government has tried to do is a technique called air gapping, which means that they're not supposed to be hooked up to the internet or have the ability to communicate the internet, so they can be not hacked by hackers. Essential databases that are used to count the ballots and actually cast votes is connected to multiple networks and the internet. And we're seeing intrusions occur, and so as we're using electronic voting as a method to conduct actual voter ballots, it's a very, very susceptible system. Most of the systems are out of date. Most of the systems aren't protected against hacks. There's definitely possibilities for other influences to have a direct impact on our elections themselves.

  • Faxploit: Breaking the Unthinkable
  • HP Fax Protocol Flaw Exposes Whole Enterprise Network to Exploit

    Check Point has discovered a new vulnerability in HP’s range of office fax machines that allow hackers to exploit a fax number related flaw and gain access to the remainder of the company’s enterprise network. This exploit is not limited to any one product or any particular company’s setup, but it encompasses all of HP’s office fax machines and all-in-one devices that have a faxing system integrated within them.

Legacy OS 2017 - Ghost of Linux past

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I am quite sad. I was really looking forward to testing Legacy OS. I like quirky, unique stuff, and the Magic Scripts impressed me so much back in the day that I was more than enthused giving this distro a go. Alas, all my expectations were shattered. From boot problems to network problems to basic browsers, the karma just wasn't there. This feels like an ancient project resurrected into the modern era, but not well adapted to it.

Hopefully, these issues can be ironed out, and then I'll take Legacy OS for another spin. At the moment, the 2017 edition feels wrong, and it doesn't have enough critical quality to warrant testing and tweaking and trying to work around some of the inherent issues. Just too much trouble. Ah well. Maybe some day. Take care.

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Velt/OS: A Material Design-Themed Desktop Environment

Filed under
GNU
Linux

When it comes to desktop environments, there is a set of popular DEs like GNOME, KDE, Xfce etc. Perhaps Lumina was one of the newest addition to the desktop environment family, until now.

Let me introduce Velt/OS to you. It’s a material design inspired desktop environment mainly for Arch Linux. The project is in the experimental phase and being ‘slowly’ developed.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News/Leftovers

Cloudgizer: An introduction to a new open source web development tool

Cloudgizer is a free open source tool for building web applications. It combines the ease of scripting languages with the performance of C, helping manage the development effort and run-time resources for cloud applications. Cloudgizer works on Red Hat/CentOS Linux with the Apache web server and MariaDB database. It is licensed under Apache License version 2. Read more

James Bottomley on Linux, Containers, and the Leading Edge

It’s no secret that Linux is basically the operating system of containers, and containers are the future of the cloud, says James Bottomley, Distinguished Engineer at IBM Research and Linux kernel developer. Bottomley, who can often be seen at open source events in his signature bow tie, is focused these days on security systems like the Trusted Platform Module and the fundamentals of container technology. Read more

TransmogrifAI From Salesforce

  • Salesforce plans to open-source the technology behind its Einstein machine-learning services
    Salesforce is open-sourcing the method it has developed for using machine-learning techniques at scale — without mixing valuable customer data — in hopes other companies struggling with data science problems can benefit from its work. The company plans to announce Thursday that TransmogrifAI, which is a key part of the Einstein machine-learning services that it believes are the future of its flagship Sales Cloud and related services, will be available for anyone to use in their software-as-a-service applications. Consisting of less than 10 lines of code written on top of the widely used Apache Spark open-source project, it is the result of years of work on training machine-learning models to predict customer behavior without dumping all of that data into a common training ground, said Shubha Nabar, senior director of data science for Salesforce Einstein.
  • Salesforce open-sources TransmogrifAI, the machine learning library that powers Einstein
    Machine learning models — artificial intelligence (AI) that identifies relationships among hundreds, thousands, or even millions of data points — are rarely easy to architect. Data scientists spend weeks and months not only preprocessing the data on which the models are to be trained, but extracting useful features (i.e., the data types) from that data, narrowing down algorithms, and ultimately building (or attempting to build) a system that performs well not just within the confines of a lab, but in the real world.