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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:25pm
Story What Do High School Students Know or Understand about Open Source Software? Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:11pm
Story Open-spec SBC is a clone of a clone of a clone of a Raspberry Pi 3 Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:08pm
Story Post/Node #111111 Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:05pm
Story Ubuntu: Didier Roche's Interviews Series and Resurgence of Ubuntu Touch Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 6:01pm
Story BSD: DragonFlyBSD's Latest and NetBSD 8.0 Release Candidate 1 Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 5:47pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 5:45pm
Story What's New in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Bionic Beaver itsfoss 25/04/2018 - 4:46pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 11:49am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2018 - 11:48am

Open Hardware/RISC-V Latest

Filed under
Hardware
  • Brains behind seL4 secure microkernel begin RISC-V chip port

    Last week, the first RISC-V port of its seL4 microkernel was released by the Data61 division of the Australian government's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO).

    seL4 is an open-source and highly secure version of the L4 microkernel that aims to be mathematically proven to be bug free, in that it works as expected as per its specifications. Meanwhile, RISC-V is an open-source instruction-set architecture, and is used as the blueprint for various open-source processor core designs – some of which are now shipping as real usable silicon, such as chips from SiFive and Greenwaves.

  • Dongwoon Anatech Licenses Codasip's Bk3 RISC-V Processor for Motor Control ICs for Mobile Camera

    Codasip, the leading supplier of RISC-V® embedded processor IP, announced today that Dongwoon Anatech, a technology leader in analog and power ICs for mobile phones, has selected Codasip’s Bk3 processor and Studio design tool for its next generation family of motor control IC products.

    Dongwoon Anatech, fabless analog semiconductor specialist, offers a wide range of analog products, including auto-focus driver IC for smartphones, AMOLED DC-DC converter, display power driver IC, and haptic driver IC.

Events: Video Conferences, Code.gov, and LibreOffice

Filed under
OSS
  • How to video conference without people hating you

    What about an integrated headset and microphone? This totally depends on the type. I tend to prefer the full sound of a real microphone but the boom mics on some of these headsets are quite good. If you have awesome heaphones already you can add a modmic to turn them into headsets. I find that even the most budget dedicated headsets sound better than earbud microphones.

  • Learn about the open source efforts of Code.gov at this event

    The U.S. government has a department looking to spread open source projects, and members will be in Baltimore this week.

    Code.gov is looking to promote reuse of open source code within the government to cut down on duplicating development work, and spread use of the code throughout the country. On April 26 event at Spark Baltimore, team members from Code.gov, the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Presidential Innovation Fellowship are among those invited to be at a meetup to share more. Held from 12-3 p.m., the event will feature talks from the invited guests about what they’re working on and Federal Source Code Policy, as well as how it can apply locally, said organizing team member Melanie Shimano.

  • LibreOffice Conference 2018 Takes Place in Tirana, Albania, for LibreOffice 6.1

    While working on the next major LibreOffice release, The Document Foundation is also prepping for this year's LibreOffice Conference, which will take place this fall in Albania.

    The LibreOffice Conference is the perfect opportunity for new and existing LibreOffice developers, users, supporters, and translators, as well as members of the Open Source community to meet up, share their knowledge, and plan the new features of the next major LibreOffice release, in this case LibreOffice 6.1, due in mid August 2018.

    A call for papers was announced over the weekend as The Document Foundation wants you to submit proposals for topics and tracks, along with a short description of yourself for the upcoming LibreOffice Conference 2018 event, which should be filed no later than June 30, 2018. More details can be found here.

  • LibreOffice Conference Call for Paper

    The Document Foundation invites all members and contributors to submit talks, lectures and workshops for this year’s conference in Tirana (Albania). The event is scheduled for late September, from Wednesday 26 to Friday 28. Whether you are a seasoned presenter or have never spoken in public before, if you have something interesting to share about LibreOffice or the Document Liberation Project, we want to hear from you!

GitLab Web IDE

Filed under
Development
  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7

    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration.

    The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.

  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE

    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser.

    “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

Filed under
Linux

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands.

Read<br />
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

Filed under
Linux

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems.

Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability

    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that.

    This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.

  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?

    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.

  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics

    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image.

    In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.

SUSE Launches Beta Program for SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing

Filed under
SUSE

While SUSE is working hard on the major SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 release, they recently announced that the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing (HPC) platform is now a dedicated SUSE Linux Enterprise product based on SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, available for public testing on 64-bit and ARM 64-bit architectures.

SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 will introduce numerous new features and improvements, including a brand new installer that offers a single unified method to install one of the supported SUSE Linux Enterprise products, including the SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing module, which comes with a set of components used in high-performance computing environments.

Read more

Also: SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module

Programming: ThreadStack and Qt for WebAssembly

Filed under
Development
  • ThreadStack: Yet Another C++ Project Trying To Make Multi-Threading Easier

    ThreadStack is yet another C++ project trying to make it easier dealing with multiple CPU threads.

    This latest open-source C++ threading project comes out of academia research. ThreadStack is self-described by its developer, Erkam Murat Bozkurt, as "an innovative software which produces a class library for C++ multi-thread programming and the outcome of the ThreadStack acts as an autonomous management system for the thread synchronization tasks. ThreadStack has a nice and useful graphical user interface and includes a short tutorial and code examples. ThreadStack offers a new way for multi-thread computing and it uses a meta program in order to produce an application specific thread synchronization library." Erkam has been working the rounds trying to raise awareness for this research on the GCC and LLVM mailing lists.

  • Beta for Qt for WebAssembly Technology Preview

    WebAssembly is a bytecode format intended to be executed in a web browser. This allows an application to be deployed to a device with a compliant web browser without going through any explicit installation steps. The application will be running inside a secure sandbox in the web browser, making it appropriate for applications that do not need full access to the device capabilities, but benefits from a swift and uncomplicated installation process.

  • Qt for WebAssembly Tech Preview Reaches Beta

    As part of next month's Qt 5.11 tool-kit update, a new technology preview module will be WebAssembly support for running Qt5 user-interfaces within your web-browser.

Kernel and Graphics: BUS1, Linux 4.17 RC2, Wayland's Weston and Mesa

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • BUS1 Still Remains Out Of The Mainline Linux Kernel, But DBus-Broker Continues

    The BUS1 in-kernel IPC mechanism born out of the ashes of KDBUS still hasn't been mainlined in the Linux kernel, but its code is still improved upon from time to time. At least though DBus-Broker as a new performance-oriented D-Bus implementation continues gaining ground in user-space.

    DBus-Broker was announced last year as a new message bus implementation of D-Bus focused on high performance and reliability while continuing to offer compatibility with the original D-Bus implementation.

  • Linux 4.17-rc2 Kernel Released With Mostly Routine Changes

    Linus Torvalds has announced the availability of the second weekly test release for what is becoming the Linux 4.17 kernel.

  • Wayland's Weston Gets Optimizations For Its Pixman Renderer

    Wayland's Weston reference compositor with its Pixman software-based renderer back-end has received a number of performance optimizations.

    Fabien Lahoudere of Collabora posted a set of patches today to optimize the Pixman renderer for Weston. In particular, there are optimizations around compositing damage to the screen as well as optimizing the shadow buffer usage. The Weston Pixman renderer is often used as a software accelerated fallback in cases where no GPU hardware acceleration may be available. As implied by the name, it uses the long-standing Pixman library that is also used by Cairo, the X.Org Server, etc, for pixel manipulation on the CPU.

  • Panfrost Gallium3D Driver For ARM Mali Can Now Render A Cube

    The Panfrost open-source driver project previously known as "Chai" for creating an open-source 3D driver stack for ARM's Mali Midgard hardware now has a working shaded cube being rendered using the open-source code as part of its new "half-way" driver based on Gallium3D.

Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The state of Thunderbolt 3 in Fedora 28

    Fedora 28 is around the corner and I wanted to highlight what we did to make the Thunderbolt 3 experience as smooth as possible. Although this post focuses on Fedora 28 for what is currently packaged and shipping, all changes are of course available upstream and should hit other distributions in the future.

  • Thunderbolt 3 Support Is In Great Shape For Fedora 28

    Red Hat developers have managed to deliver on their goals around improving Thunderbolt support on the Linux desktop with the upcoming Fedora 28 distribution update.

    This has been part of their goal of having secure Thunderbolt support where users can authorize devices and/or restrict access to certain capabilities on a per-device basis, which is part of Red Hat's Bolt project and currently has UI elements for the GNOME desktop.

New Heptio Announcements

Filed under
Server
OSS

New Terminal App in Chome OS Hints at Upcoming Support for Linux Applications

Filed under
OS
Linux

According to a Reddit thread, a Chromebook user recently spotted a new Terminal app added to the app drawer when running on the latest Chrome OS Dev channel. Clicking the icon would apparently prompt the user to install the Terminal app, which requires about 200 MB of disk space.

The installation prompt notes the fact that the Terminal app can be used to develop on your Chromebook. It also suggests that users will be able to run native apps and command-line tools seamlessly and securely. Considering the fact that Chrome OS is powered by the Linux kernel, this can only mean one thing.

Read more

Raspberry Pi DAC HAT has dual Burr Brown DACs and a 128dB SNR

Filed under
Linux

Orchard Audio’s “ApplePi DAC” audio HAT add-on for the Raspberry Pi is available for $175 on Kickstarter, featuring two Burr Brown PCM1794A monoaural DACs, a 128dB SNR, and both balanced and unbalanced outputs.

Orchard Audio quickly surpassed its $5K Kickstarter goal for its ApplePi DAC HAT board, which it is promoting as “the most advanced and highest performance sound card hat for the Raspberry Pi.” It didn’t hurt that Orchard posted a couple of favorable reviews, including one from Volumio co-founder Michelangelo, who wrote: “This DAC is producing the most detailed sound to ever come out of my Raspberry Pi.”

Read more

Hands-On with Ubuntu's Brand New Welcome Screen in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

With only three days left before Canonical's highly anticipated Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system hits the streets, today we're taking a first look at one of its newest features.

As the headline implies, the next Ubuntu release will ship with a brand new Welcome screen, for the first time in the history of the Linux-based operating system. After installing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS on your personal computer, you'll be greeted by a welcome screen to help you set up a few things.

Welcome screens have been used before in the Ubuntu world, by the Ubuntu MATE and Ubuntu Budgie official flavors for example, and are also being used by numerous other GNU/Linux distributions out there to provide a one-stop solution for setting up your freshly installed operating system.

Ubuntu itself never used a welcome screen, but with the forthcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release things change in this regard. The new welcome screen in Bionic Beaver will help new and returning users better understand how the brand-new GNOME user interface works, as well as to set up things like Canonical Livepatch.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Security Stunts From Microsoft and Crash Reporting

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software: Liberation of Code, GNU Parallel, Devhelp

Filed under
Software
  • When should you open source your software?

    It’s 20 years this this since the term ‘Open Source’ was coined. In that time the movement for free and open software has gone from a niche to a common method of distribution and a normal way of operating for businesses.

    Major technology shifts are now driven by open source technologies: Big Data (Hadoop, Spark), AI (TensorFlow, Caffe), and Containers (Docker, Kubernetes) are all open projects. Massive companies including Google, Facebook, and even Lyft regularly release Open Source tools for the world to use. Microsoft – whose former CEO once described Linux as a cancer – now embraces the concept.

  • GNU Parallel 20180422 ('Tiangong-1') released

    Quote of the month:

    Today I discovered GNU Parallel, and I don’t know what to do with all this spare time.
    --Ryan Booker

  • Devhelp news

    For more context, I started to contribute to Devhelp in 2015 to fix some annoying bugs (it’s an application that I use almost every day). Then I got hooked, I contributed more, became a co-maintainer last year, etc. Devhelp is a nice little project, I would like it to be better known and used more outside of GNOME development, for example for the Linux kernel now that they have a good API documentation infrastructure (it’s just a matter of generating *.devhelp2 index files alongside the HTML pages).

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More in Tux Machines

Critical Live Boot Bug Fixed and Ubuntu 18.04 is Finally Released

A critical bug in live boot session delayed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release for several hours. The bug has been fixed and the ISO are available to download. Read more

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date. Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution. And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices. Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.
  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture
    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months. Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management. Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.
  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs
    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report. The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.