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Tuesday, 23 Oct 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2018 - 8:46am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 11:46pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 11:42pm
Story Security: U.S. CMS Breach and New Security Woes for Popular 'IoT' Protocols Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 11:37pm
Story Ubuntu News Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 3 20/10/2018 - 11:33pm
Story BSD: FreeBSD 12.0 Beta and Upgrading OpenBSD with Ansible Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 11:29pm
Story Graphics: XRGEARS and Arcan's Latest Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 11:26pm
Story CoC/Systemd Supremacy Over Linux Kernel Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 11:24pm
Story ODROID 'Hacker Board' Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 11:21pm
Story A Look At The Many Features On The Table For The Upcoming Linux 4.20~5.0 Kernel Roy Schestowitz 20/10/2018 - 10:38pm

Suddenly Linux runs in Android

Filed under
Android
GNU
Linux

Yes, Android is based on a modified version of the Linux kernel. But once you’ve got Android running, you can utilize this app to get Linux running inside Android. But why, you might be asking – why would you want to do that? If you have to ask, you might just want to turn back now. With this app, users are able to run Debian or Ubuntu, games like Adventure or Zork, and Math systems like Gnuplot, Octave, and R.

UserLand allows one Session at a time and can also monitor filesystems. If you’re looking for a graphical interface, and not just a command line system, you might want to take a peek at the operating system Android. In other words: This is mostly just for fun, and a sort of proof of concept – but it has so much potential!

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Linux Devices: ARM/Linux in Servers and Embedded, Chromecast

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Love Microsoft Teams? Love Linux? Then you won't love this

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft loves Linux. Unless you are a Linux user who happens to want to use Teams. In that case, you probably aren’t feeling the love quite so much.

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Red Hat News and Developments

Filed under
Red Hat
  • The GNOME Infrastructure is moving to Openshift

    The cluster consists of 3 master nodes (controllers, api, etcd), 4 compute nodes and 2 infrastructure nodes (internal docker registry, cluster console, haproxy-based routers, SSL edge termination). For the persistent storage we’re currently making good use of the Red Hat Gluster Storage (RHGS) product that Red Hat is kindly sponsoring together with the Openshift subscriptions. For any app that might require a database we have an external (as not managed as part of Openshift) fully redundant, synchronous, multi-master MariaDB cluster based on Galera (2 data nodes, 1 arbiter).

    The release we’re currently running is the recently released 3.11, which comes with the so-called “Cluster Console”, a web UI that allows you to manage a wide set of the underlying objects that previously were only available to the oc cli client and with a set of Monitoring and Metrics toolings (Prometheus, Grafana) that can be accessed as part of the Cluster Console (Grafana dashboards that show how the cluster is behaving) or externally via their own route.

  • OpenShift Commons Gathering Seattle Announces Speakers from Intel, GE, Progressive, HealthPartners, TicketMaster, USAA and more!

    The OpenShift Commons Gathering brings together experts from all over the world to discuss the container technologies, best practices for cloud-native application developers and the open source software projects that underpin the OpenShift ecosystem to help take us all to the next level in cloud-native computing. This final Gathering of 2018 will feature 400+ developers, project leads, cloud architects, DevOps professionals, sysadmins, and cloud-native practitioners coming together to explore the next steps in making container technologies successful and secure at scale.

  • Modernize your application deployment with Lift and Shift

    For many software modernization projects, it’s all about learning to love, lift, and shift. No, wait. It’s all about learning to love lift and shift. The basic idea behind lift and shift is to modernize how an existing application is packaged and deployed. Because it’s not about rewriting the application itself, lift and shift is typically quick to implement.

    Modern development environments rely on containers for packaging and deployment. A modern environment also uses a continuous integration / continuous deployment (CI/CD) system that automatically builds, tests, and deploys an application whenever its source code changes.

  • Istio on OpenShift: Technology Preview 2 of Service Mesh Now Available

    It’s been a few weeks since the release of the first tech preview of Istio on OpenShift. Since then a lot has happened, and we are happy to announce the availability of our second tech preview release.

    In this release we are adding a whole new user interface from the upstream Kiali project. The Kiali user interface can help Istio users understand what’s happening in their service mesh, canl show how the various components are connected, and can help to detect issues (HTTP 500, pod not started, misconfigurations) to better fix those.

  • Insider Selling: Red Hat Inc (RHT) EVP Sells 960 Shares of Stock
  • Featured Stock: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Scout Investments Inc. Acquires 3,034 Shares of Red Hat Inc (RHT)
  • Get "The Art of Modern Application Development" the Red Hat way - eBook, free [Ed: Apparently a paid-for ad]

Games: Steam Play Games, Puzlogic, and Rocket League ‘RocketID’ Delays

Filed under
Gaming

MidnightBSD Hits 1.0! Checkout What’s New

Filed under
BSD

A couple days ago, Lucas Holt announced the release of MidnightBSD 1.0. Let’s take a quick look at what is included in this new release.

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Android Integration Extension For Gnome GSConnect v13 Stable Released

Filed under
Android
GNOME

The latest GSConnect v13, released today, is a rewrite with with changes to the architecture, settings and default behavior, and it requires Gnome Shell 3.28 or 3.30. The new version includes redesigned settings, Do Not Disturb mode, quick reply from notifications, and other features and improvements.

GSConnect is a complete KDE Connect protocol implementation written in GJS for Gnome Shell, which integrates Android devices with your Gnome desktop. Using it, you can easily send files between your Gnome desktop and Android smartphone, sync the clipboard or notifications between the two devices, browse files wirelessly on your Android device from your desktop, and much more.

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Mozilla: WebRender, Spoke, Encrypted SNI, Blender, Opus 1.3

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • WebRender newsletter #26

    Here comes the 26th issue of WebRender’s newsletter.

  • Getting serious about political ad transparency with Ad Analysis for Facebook

    Do you know who is trying to influence your vote online? The votes of your friends and neighbors? Would you even know how to find out? Despite all the talk of election security, the tech industry still falls short on political ad transparency. With the U.S. midterm elections mere weeks away, this is a big problem.

    We can’t solve this problem alone, but we can help by making it more visible and easier to understand. Today we are announcing the release of our experimental extension, Ad Analysis for Facebook, to give you greater transparency into the online advertisements, including political ads, you see on Facebook.

  • Introducing Spoke: Make your own custom 3D social scenes

    Today we’re thrilled to announce the beta release of Spoke: the easiest way to create your own custom social 3D scenes you can use with Hubs.

    Over the last year, our Social Mixed Reality team has been developing Hubs, a WebVR-based social experience that runs right in your browser. In Hubs, you can communicate naturally in VR or on your phone or PC by simply sharing a link.

    Along the way, we’ve added features that enable social presence, self-expression, and content sharing. We’ve also offered a variety of scenes to choose from, like a castle space, an atrium, and even a wide open space high in the sky.

  • Encrypted SNI Comes to Firefox Nightly

    Firefox Nightly now supports encrypting the TLS Server Name Indication (SNI) extension, which helps prevent attackers on your network from learning your browsing history. You can enable encrypted SNI today and it will automatically work with any site that supports it. Currently, that means any site hosted by Cloudflare, but we’re hoping other providers will add ESNI support soon.

  • If you build it (together), they will come…

    Mozilla and the Khronos Group collaborate to bring glTF capabilities to Blender

    Mozilla is committed to the next wave of creativity in the open Web, in which people can access, create and share immersive VR and AR experiences across platforms and devices. What it takes though is an enthusiastic, skilled and growing community of creators, artists, and also businesses forming a healthy ecosystem, as well as tool support for web developers who build content for it. To overcome a fragmented environment and to allow for broad adoption, we need the leading content format to be open, and frameworks and toolsets to be efficient and interoperable. Ensuring that tools for creation, modification and viewing are open to the entire community and that there aren’t gatekeepers to creativity is one of the main working areas for Mozilla’s Mixed Reality (WebXR) Team. Building on its “Open by Design” strategy Open Innovation partnered with that team around Lars Bergstrom to find neat, yet impactful ways to stimulate external collaboration, co-development and co-funding of technology.

  • Mozilla Productivity Tip: Managing try pushes

    I tend to do a lot of try pushes for testing changes to Gecko and other stuff, and by using one of TreeHerder's (apparently) lesser-known features, managing these pushes to see their results is really easy. If you have trouble managing your try pushes, consider this:

    Open a tab with an author filter for yourself. You can do this by clicking on your email address on any of your try pushes (see highlighted area in screenshot below). Keep this tab open, forever. By default it shows you the last 10 try pushes you did, and if you leave it open, it will auto-update to show newer try pushes that you do.

  • Opus 1.3 Released - One Of The Leading Lossy Open-Source Audio Codecs

    Opus 1.3 features improvements to allow using SILK with bitrates down to around 5kb/s, wideband encoding down to 9kb/s, improved Ambisonics support, better security hardening, a new speech/music detector, and more.

  • Introducing Opus 1.3

    The Opus Audio Codec gets another major update with the release of version 1.3 (demo).

    Opus is a totally open, royalty-free audio codec that can be used for all audio applications, from music streaming and storage to high-quality video-conferencing and VoIP. Six years after its standardization by the IETF, Opus is now included in all major browsers and mobile operating systems. It has been adopted for a wide range of applications, and is the default WebRTC codec.

Fedora 29 Is Blocked From Release Due To 11 Open Bugs

Filed under
Red Hat

Fedora 29 will not be managing to deliver its final release right on time due to lingering blocker bugs.

At the first Fedora 29 Final meeting today it was declared a No-Go for releasing next week on 23 October as had been planned.

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Keynotes announced for LibrePlanet 2019 free software conference

Filed under
GNU

Ubuntu: Infographic, New Releases, Ubuntu Podcast and Statistics

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Infographic: Snaps in numbers

    Coinciding with the release of Ubuntu 18.10 today, we have celebrated the exceptional adoption of snaps by sharing the infographic below. From popular snaps to daily installs, this infographic demonstrates where, when and why users are installing and adopting the secure, Linux application format. For more commentary around these numbers, check out this recent blog. Alternatively, start installing your chosen snaps.

  • Ubuntu 18.10:Multi-cloud,new desktop theme & enhanced snap integration

    Canonical today announced the release of Ubuntu 18.10, focused on multi-cloud deployments, AI software development, a new community desktop theme and richer snap desktop integration.

    “Ubuntu is now the world’s reference platform for AI engineering and analytics” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical. “We accelerate developer productivity and help enterprises operate at speed and at scale, across multiple clouds and diverse edge appliances.”

    This year, the financial services industry has engaged significantly with Canonical and Ubuntu for infrastructure efficiency on-premise and to accelerate their move to the cloud. The push for machine learning analytics and of fintech efforts around blockchain, distributed ledger applications and cryptocurrencies are current drivers of Ubuntu investments and deployments.

  • Ubuntu Studio 18.10 Released

    The Ubuntu Studio team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu Studio 18.10 “Cosmic Cuttlefish”. As a regular release, this version of Ubuntu Studio will be supported for 9 months.

    Since it’s just out, you may experience some issues, so you might want to wait a bit before upgrading. Please see the release notes for a complete list of changes and known issues.

  • Ubuntu MATE: Ubuntu MATE 18.10 Final Release

    Ubuntu MATE 18.10 is a modest, yet strategic, upgrade over our 18.04 release. If you want bug fixes and improved hardware support then 18.10 is for you. For those who prefer staying on the LTS then everything in this 18.10 release is also important for the upcoming 18.04.2 release. Oh yeah, we've also made a bespoke Ubuntu MATE 18.10 image for the GPD Pocket and GPD Pocket 2.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S11E32 – Thirty-Two Going on Spinster

    This week we interview Daniel Foré about the final release of elementary 5.0 (Juno), bring you some Android love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 11 Episode 32 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

  • Canonical have released some statistics from the Ubuntu installer survey

    When installing Ubuntu 18.04, Canonical's installer will offer to send some statistics to them. Canonical have now released some of this. One thing to note, is that this data does not include Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Core, cloud images or and any other Ubuntu derivatives that don't include the report in their own installer.

    They've had some good results from it, with 66% of people sending them their data. It's a nice start, but I think they really need to do some separation of physical and virtual machines, since it seems they're merged together which will skew a bunch of the data I would imagine.

Linux-driven embedded PCs target autonomous cars

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Kontron announced two Ubuntu-driven computers for autonomous vehicles. The S2000 is a lab dev platform with a Xeon 8160T and the EvoTRAC S1901 offers a choice of Kontron modules including a new Atom C3000 based, Type 7 COMe-bDV7R.

Kontron has launched a Kontron’s S2000 Development Platform for developing autonomous in-vehicle computers and is prepping an EvoTRAC S1901 in-vehicle PC for use in advanced automotive applications, including autonomous vehicles. Both systems ship with Intel processors running a pre-installed Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Linux stack. The systems follow earlier Kontron automotive computers such as the EvoTrac G102 in-vehicle cellular gateway.

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OpenBSD 6.4 Released - Disables SMT/HT By Default, Updates Radeon DRM

Filed under
BSD

Adding to the exciting release day is Theo de Raadt releasing OpenBSD 6.4 as the newest version of this BSD operating system known for its security mindfulness.

Exciting us from a technical standpoint and for anyone using OpenBSD on the desktop is a newer Radeon DRM display driver, but it's still very dated compared to what is found in the mainline Linux kernel. Their Radeon DRM driver is now synced against the Linux 4.4.155 LTS upstream state that then provides mode-setting support for various GCN 1.0/1.1 graphics cards as a new feature to OpenBSD... But newer GPUs and the many other open-source AMD improvements past Linux 4.4 haven't made their way into the OpenBSD world yet. Even still, Radeon graphics remain among the best supported options for what is available to OpenBSD users. The Radeon DRM code is also now available for 64-bit ARM OpenBSD users.

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Direct: OpenBSD 6.4

LWN: OpenBSD 6.4

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 OpenCL, CUDA, TensorFlow GPU Compute Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Here are the first of our benchmarks for the GeForce RTX 2070 graphics card that launched this week. In our inaugural Ubuntu Linux benchmarking with the GeForce RTX 2070 is a look at the OpenCL / CUDA GPU computing performance including with TensorFlow and various models being tested on the GPU. The benchmarks are compared to an assortment of available graphics cards and also include metrics for power consumption, performance-per-Watt, and performance-per-dollar.

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Introduction To BASH Scripting - Learn BASH #1

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to the introductory series on BASH scripting. This series will cover a complete guide on BASH starting from the foundation of computer programming then progressing on to the basic constructs of this scripting language and finally, you will also create a simple mini-project using this scripting language.

Read<br />
more

Games: Hand of Fate 2, Rocket League, Reigns: Game of Thrones

Filed under
Gaming

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

OSS Leftover

Filed under
OSS
  • How an affordable open source eye tracker is helping thousands communicate

    In 2015, while sat in a meeting at his full-time job, Julius Sweetland posted to Reddit about a project he had quietly been working on for years, that would help people with motor neurone disease communicate using just their eyes and an application. He forgot about the post for a couple of hours before friends messaged him to say he'd made the front page.

    Now three years on Optikey, the open source eye-tracking communication tool, is being used by thousands of people, largely through word of mouth recommendations. Sweetland was speaking at GitHub Universe at the Palace of Fine Art in San Francisco, and he took some time to speak with Techworld about the project.

    [...]

    Originally, Sweetland's exposure to open source had largely been through the consumption of tools such as the GIMP.

    "I knew of the concept, I didn't really know how the nuts and bolts worked, I was always a little blase about how do you make money from something like that... but flipping it around again I'm still coming from the point of view that there's no money in my product, so I still don't understand how people make money in open source...

  • Fission open source serverless framework gets updated

    Platform9 just released updates to Fission.io - the open source, Kubernetes-native Serverless framework, with new features enabling developers and IT Operations to improve the quality and reliability of serverless applications.

    Other new features include Automated Canary Deployments to reduce the risk of failed releases, Prometheus integration for automated monitoring and alerts, and fine-grained cost and performance optimization capabilities. With this latest release, Fission offers the most complete set of features to allow Dev and Ops teams to safely adopt Serverless and benefit from the speed, cost savings and scalability of this cloud native development pattern on any environment - either in the public cloud or on-premises.

  • Alphabet’s DeepMind open-sources key building blocks from its AI projects
  • United States: It's Ten O'Clock: Do You Know Where Your Software Developers Are? [Ed: Smith Gambrell & Russell LLP are liars. Dana Hustins says FSF "purport to convert others' proprietary software into open source software" in there. They paint GPL as a conspiracy of some kind to entrap proprietary s/w developers.]
  • Transatomic Power To Open Source IP Regarding Advanced Molten Salt Reactors [Ed: There's no such thing as "IP", Duane Morris LLP. There are copyrights, trademarks, patents etc. and Transatomic basically made code free.]
  • Code Review--an Excerpt from VM Brasseur's New Book Forge Your Future with Open Source

    Even new programmers can provide a lot of value with their code reviews. You don't have to be a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer with years and years of experience to have valuable insights. In fact, you don't even have to be a programmer at all. You just have to be knowledgable enough to spot patterns. While you won't be able to do a complete review without programming knowledge, you may still spot things that could use some work or clarification.

    If you're not a Rockstar Ninja 10x Unicorn Diva programmer, not only is your code review feedback still valuable, but you can also learn a great deal in the process: Code layout, programming style, domain knowledge, best practices, neat little programming tricks you'd not have seen otherwise, and sometimes antipatterns (or "how not to do things"). So don't let the fact that you're unfamiliar with the code, the project, or the language hold you back from reviewing code contributions. Give it a go and see what there is to learn and discover.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • OSNEXUS and Pogo Linux to Exhibit Software-Defined Storage Solutions at All Things Open
  • Warning: 'Soul Calibur 6' Is Causing A Serious Problem For Linux Gamers
    The good news: right out of the box, Soul Calibur VI seems to offer decent performance on Linux via Steam Play and Proton. The bad news? The game fails to detect an online network, and then when gamers switch over to play on Windows they're finding themselves completely blocked from playing the fighter online.
  • Latte Dock, new painting is coming...
    In the video you can see the upcoming coloring mechanism of Latte's next version. Even though I am using plasma 5.14 and I love it, it is also the reason I am already expecting impatiently plasma 5.15 this January!! :) This functionality can be supported only with plasma 5.15 .
  • BGP LLGR: robust and reactive BGP sessions
    On a BGP-routed network with multiple redundant paths, we seek to achieve two goals concerning reliability: A failure on a path should quickly bring down the related BGP sessions. A common expectation is to recover in less than a second by diverting the traffic to the remaining paths. As long as a path is operational, the related BGP sessions should stay up, even under duress.
  • Measuring the speaker frequency response using the AUDMES free software GUI - nice free software
    My current home stereo is a patchwork of various pieces I got on flee markeds over the years. It is amazing what kind of equipment show up there. I've been wondering for a while if it was possible to measure how well this equipment is working together, and decided to see how far I could get using free software. After trawling the web I came across an article from DIY Audio and Video on Speaker Testing and Analysis describing how to test speakers, and it listing several software options, among them AUDio MEasurement System (AUDMES). It is the only free software system I could find focusing on measuring speakers and audio frequency response. In the process I also found an interesting article from NOVO on Understanding Speaker Specifications and Frequency Response and an article from ecoustics on Understanding Speaker Frequency Response, with a lot of information on what to look for and how to interpret the graphs. Armed with this knowledge, I set out to measure the state of my speakers. The first hurdle was that AUDMES hadn't seen a commit for 10 years and did not build with current compilers and libraries. I got in touch with its author, who no longer was spending time on the program but gave me write access to the subversion repository on Sourceforge. The end result is that now the code build on Linux and is capable of saving and loading the collected frequency response data in CSV format. The application is quite nice and flexible, and I was able to select the input and output audio interfaces independently. This made it possible to use a USB mixer as the input source, while sending output via my laptop headphone connection. I lacked the hardware and cabling to figure out a different way to get independent cabling to speakers and microphone.
  • Arm Offers Lower Cost Cortex-A5 License
    Arm is now offer a low-cost route to developing Cortex-A5 based Linux-capable ASICs for embedded Internet of Things (IoT) devices featuring advanced edge processing, with a new one-year license fee of $75,000. This fee provides access to the CPU IP and one year of design support, through Arm's DesignStart program.
  • Arm DesignStart program expands to accelerate Linux-based embedded design
    While the breadth of IoT provides endless possibilities for advanced software development, it also holds challenges for designers. In a rapidly changing and competitive market, designers need to differentiate their products and deliver enhanced designs at the lowest cost in the fastest time possible. One avenue for differentiation is “rich embedded processing”, which we define at Arm as providing an advanced level of performance and sophistication. Sometimes that includes an interactive user interface, but on the whole, it is about offering advanced capability. These products use a comprehensive set of software stacks and benefit from the breadth of ready-to-run middleware and applications available on fully featured operating systems such as Linux. Companies developing rich embedded IoT designs are now turning toward application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) to meet their specific needs.

Red Hat: OpenShift and Awards

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift 3.11 Release Update with Scott McCarty (Red Hat)
    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Scott McCarty and numerous other members of the OpenShift Product Management team gave an in-depth look at Red Hat’s OpenShift’s latest release 3.11 and some insights in to the road ahead.
  • Awards roll call: Red Hat awards, June to October 2018
    Depending on the weather in your region, it’s safe to say that the seasons are changing so it’s a good time to look back at what was a busy few months for Red Hat, especially when it came to industry awards for our technical and product leadership. In recent months, Red Hat products and technologies took home twenty awards, highlighting the breadth and depth of our product portfolio as well as the expertise that we provide to our customers. In addition, Red Hat as a company won five awards recognizing its growth and culture as a leader in the industry.
  • More advice from a judge - what it takes to win a Red Hat Innovation Award
    Last year I penned the below post to provide insight into what the judges of the Red Hat Innovation Awards are looking for when reviewing submissions. Looking back, I would give almost the identical advice again this year...maybe with a few tweaks. With all the stellar nominations that we receive, the question I often get is, “how can we make our entry standout?” There’s no magic formula for winning the Red Hat Innovation Awards, but there are things that the other judges and I look for in the entries. Overall, we’re looking for the project that tells a compelling story. It’s not just about sharing what Red Hat products and services you used, we want to hear the full narrative. What challenges did you face; how you implemented the project; and ultimately, what was the true business impact and transformation that took place? Submissions that are able to showcase how open source culture and values were key to success, or how the project is making a difference in the lives of others, are the entries that most often rise to the top.

today's howtos

OSS Leftovers

  • How to be an effective and professional member of the Samba user and development Community
    For many years we have run these lists dedicated to developing and promoting Samba, without any set of clear guidelines for people to know what to expect when participating.  What do we require? What kind of behavior is encouraged?
  • Blockcerts Updates Open Source Blockchain Architecture
    Learning Machine is making changes to its Blockcerts Credential Issuer, Verifier and Wallet to enable native support for records issuance and verification using any blockchain. Blockcerts was launched by Learning Machine and MIT Media Lab in 2016 as new way to allow students to receive digital diplomas through an app, complementing a traditional paper degree. Blockcerts was originally designed to be blockchain-agnostic, which means that open standards can be used to anchor records in any blockchain. The Blockcerts Universal Identifier recognizes which blockchain is being used and verifies accordingly. Currently, the open source project has added support for bitcoin and Ethereum blockchains, but anyone can add support through the project's GitHub page.
  • First full featured open-source Ethereum block explorer BlockScout launched by POA Network
  • Amsterdam-based ING Bank Introduces Open-Source Zero Knowledge Technology
  • ING Bank Launches Open Source Privacy Improvement Add-On for Blockchains
  • Imec tool accelerates DNA sequencing 10x
    As a result, in a typical run, elPrep is up to ten times faster than other software tools using the same resources. It is designed as a seamless replacement that delivers the exact same results as GATK4.0 developed by the Broad Institute. elPrep has been written in the Go programming language and is available through the open-source GNU Affero General Public License v3 (AGPL-3.0).
  • On the low adoption of automated testing in FOSS
    A few times in the recent past I've been in the unfortunate position of using a prominent Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) program or library, and running into issues of such fundamental nature that made me wonder how those issues even made it into a release. In all cases, the answer came quickly when I realized that, invariably, the project involved either didn't have a test suite, or, if it did have one, it was not adequately comprehensive. I am using the term comprehensive in a very practical, non extreme way. I understand that it's often not feasible to test every possible scenario and interaction, but, at the very least, a decent test suite should ensure that under typical circumstances the code delivers all the functionality it promises to. [...] Most FOSS projects, at least those not supported by some commercial entity, don't come with any warranty; it's even stated in the various licenses! The lack of any formal obligations makes it relatively inexpensive, both in terms of time and money, to have the occasional bug in the codebase. This means that there are fewer incentives for the developer to spend extra resources to try to safeguard against bugs. When bugs come up, the developers can decide at their own leisure if and when to fix them and when to release the fixed version. Easy! At first sight, this may seem like a reasonably pragmatic attitude to have. After all, if fixing bugs is so cheap, is it worth spending extra resources trying to prevent them?
  •  
  • Chrome for Linux, Mac, and Windows Now Features Picture-in-Picture by Default
    Chromium evanghelist at Google François Beaufort announced today that Picture-in-Picture (PiP) support is now enabled by defualt in the Google Chrome web browser for Linux, Mac, and Windows platforms. Google's engineers have been working for months to add Picture-in-Picture (PiP) support to the Google Chrome web browser, but the long-anticipated feature is finally here, enabled by default in the latest version for Linux, Mac, and Windows operating systems. The feature lets you detach a video in a floating window so you can watch it while doing something else on your computer.
  • Teaching With an Index Card: the Benefits of Free, Open-Source Tools
  • Decentralized Authentication for Self-Sovereign Identities using Name Systems
    The GNU Name System (GNS) is a fully decentralized public key infrastructure and name system with private information retrieval semantics. It serves a holistic approach to interact seamlessly with IoT ecosystems and enables people and their smart objects to prove their identity, membership and privileges - compatible with existing technologies. In this report we demonstrate how a wide range of private authentication and identity management scenarios are addressed by GNS in a cost-efficient, usable and secure manner. This simple, secure and privacy-friendly authentication method is a significant breakthrough when cyber peace, privacy and liability are the priorities for the benefit of a wide range of the population. After an introduction to GNS itself, we show how GNS can be used to authenticate servers, replacing the Domain Name System (DNS) and X.509 certificate authorities (CAs) with a more privacy-friendly but equally usable protocol which is trustworthy, human-centric and includes group authentication. We also built a demonstrator to highlight how GNS can be used in medical computing to simplify privacy-sensitive data processing in the Swiss health-care system. Combining GNS with attribute-based encryption, we created ReclaimID, a robust and reliable OpenID Connect-compatible authorization system. It includes simple, secure and privacy-friendly single sign-on to seamlessly share selected attributes with Web services, cloud ecosystems. Further, we demonstrate how ReclaimID can be used to solve the problem of addressing, authentication and data sharing for IoT devices. These applications are just the beginning for GNS; the versatility and extensibility of the protocol will lend itself to an even broader range of use-cases. GNS is an open standard with a complete free software reference implementation created by the GNU project. It can therefore be easily audited, adapted, enhanced, tailored, developed and/or integrated, as anyone is allowed to use the core protocols and implementations free of charge, and to adopt them to their needs under the terms of the GNU Affero General Public License, a free software license approved by the Free Software Foundation.
  • Make: an open source hardware, Arduino-powered, 3D-printed wire-bending machine
    How To Mechatronics has pulled together detailed instructions and a great video explaining how to make an Arduino-powered, 3D-printed wire-bending machine whose gears can create arbitrary vector images out of precision-bent continuous lengths of wire.
  • RApiDatetime 0.0.4: Updates and Extensions
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