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Sunday, 25 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 9:13pm
Story Red Hat and Fedora: David Egts, Radcom, Google Summer of Code 2018, FOSS Wave Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 9:08pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 9:05pm
Story OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 9:03pm
Story France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 7:07pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 6:55pm
Story Security: Updates, Word and More Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 6:53pm
Story Mozilla Development and News Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 6:00pm
Story Google Summer of Code 2018 for Qt and Qt Roadmap for 2018 Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 5:57pm
Story Calculate Linux 17.12.2 released Roy Schestowitz 22/02/2018 - 4:57pm

Ubuntu vs Linux Mint: Which distro is best for your business?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linux is attracting a growing number of users to its enormous selection of distribution systems. These 'distros' are operating systems with the Linux kernel at their foundation and a variety of software built on top to create a desktop environment tailored to the needs of users.

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are among the most popular flavours of these.

Ubuntu's name derives from a Southern Africa philosophy that can loosely be defined as "humanity to others", a spirit its founders wanted to harness in a complete operating system that is both free and highly customisable.

Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu and built as a user-friendly alternative with full out-of-the-box multimedia support. By some measures, Linux Mint has surpassed the popularity of its progenitor, but Ubuntu retains a loyal following of its own.

Read more

Ubuntu Core Embedded Linux Operating System Now Runs on Rigado’s IoT Gateways

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical has apparently partnered with Rigado, a private company that provides Bluetooth LE (Low Energy) modules and custom IoT gateways for them, as well as for Wi-Fi, LoRa, and Thread wireless technologies, to deploy its slimmed-down Ubuntu Core operating system across Rigado’s Edge Connectivity gateway solutions.

"Rigado’s enterprise-grade, easily configurable IoT gateways will offer Ubuntu Core’s secure and open architecture for companies globally to deploy and manage their commercial IoT applications, such as asset tracking and connected guest experiences," says Canonical.

Read more

Canonical's Unity 8 Desktop Revived by UBports with Support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Ubuntu

As you are aware, last year Canonical decided to stop the development of its futuristic Unity 8 desktop for Ubuntu and the Ubuntu Touch mobile OS. Days after their sad announcement a few community members appeared interested in taking over the development of Unity 8, the most promising one being Yunit.

However, the Yunit project didn't manage to improve Unity 8 for desktops in the last few months as much as the community would have wanted, and, after a long battle, they decided to pass the baton to UBports team, which is announcing the initial build for devs and an official website for Unity 8.

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Openwashing of AT&T by the Linux Foundation

Filed under
OSS

Plasma 5.12.2 bugfix updates for 17.10 backports and 18.04 development release

Filed under
Security

Users of Kubuntu 17.10 Artful Aardvark can now upgrade via our backports PPA to the 2nd bugfix release (5.12.2) of the Plasma 5.12 LTS release series from KDE.

Likewise, testers of our development release 18.04 Bionic Beaver will receive the update imminently.

The full changelog of fixes for 5.12.2 can be found here.

Read more

Create a wiki on your Linux desktop with Zim

Filed under
Linux

There's no denying the usefulness of a wiki, even to a non-geek. You can do so much with one—write notes and drafts, collaborate on projects, build complete websites. And so much more.

I've used more than a few wikis over the years, either for my own work or at various contract and full-time gigs I've held. While traditional wikis are fine, I really like the idea of desktop wikis. They're small, easy to install and maintain, and even easier to use. And, as you've probably guessed, there are a number a desktop wikis available for Linux.

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Living The Linux Laptop Lifestyle

Filed under
Linux

Another great advantage of open source software: you can run it off of a flash drive before installing it. And I have to admit that I loved Linux Lite's out-of-the-box feel, so much so that I reconsidered installing my number two selection: LXLE, which is designed for underpowered older machines. According to a label on the bottom of my Toughbook, this pre-Linux laptop was decommissioned in 2005, making it well over ten years old. And so I replaced the RAM, installed Linux Lite, and after a short period, I was back to living a Linux laptop lifestyle while waiting for my charger.

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Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Filed under
Linux

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics.

Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere.

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Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

Filed under
Linux
OSS

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC.

Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers.

Read more

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android.

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Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More

Filed under
Red Hat

Browsers: Mozilla and Iridium

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web
  • Best Web Browser

    When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser. A direct response to Google Chrome, Firefox Quantum also boasts decreased RAM usage and a more streamlined user interface.

  • Share Exactly What You See On-Screen With Firefox Screenshots

    A “screenshot” is created when you capture what’s on your computer screen, so you can save it as a reference, put it in a document, or send it as an image file for others to see exactly what you see.

  • What Happens when you Contribute, revisited

    I sat down to write a post about my students' experiences this term contributing to open source, and apparently I've written this before (and almost exactly a year ago to the day!) The thing about teaching is that it's cyclic, so you'll have to forgive me as I give a similar lecture here today.

    I'm teaching two classes on open source development right now, two sections in an introductory course, and another two in a follow-up intermediate course. The students are just starting to get some releases submitted, and I've been going through their blogs, pull requests, videos (apparently this generation likes making videos, which is something new for me), tweets, and the like. I learn a lot from my students, and I wanted to share some of what I'm seeing.

  • Iridium Browser: A Browser for the Privacy Conscience

    Iridium is a web browser based on Chromium project. It has been customized to not share your data and thus keeping your privacy intact.

Programming: Pyenv, GitHub, LLVM

Filed under
Development
  • Pyenv – Python Version Management Made Easier

    You’re a programmer who wants to test your python code on multiple different Python environments. What would you do? Install a specific python version and test your code and then uninstall that version and again install another different version and test code? No, wait! It is completely unnecessary. Say hello to Pyenv , an useful utility to manage multiple Python versions, simultaneously. It made the python version management easier than ever. It is used to install, uninstall and switch to multiple different versions of Python.

  • GitHub Predicts Hottest 2018 Open Source Trends

    As the world’s largest repository of open source projects, GitHub is in a unique position to witness what developers are up to. GitHub staff recently sifted through the site’s 2017’s data in order to identify top open source trends they predict will thrive in 2018.

  • What is LLVM? The power behind Swift, Rust, Clang, and more

    New languages, and improvements on existing ones, are mushrooming throughout the develoment landscape. Mozilla’s Rust, Apple’s Swift, Jetbrains’s Kotlin, and many other languages provide developers with a new range of choices for speed, safety, convenience, portability, and power.

    Why now? One big reason is new tools for building languages—specifically, compilers. And chief among them is LLVM (Low-Level Virtual Machine), an open source project originally developed by Swift language creator Chris Lattner as a research project at the University of Illinois.

Security: Reproducible Builds, Windows Phones, Debian, Mageia Identity Security Breach and More

Filed under
Security
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #147
  • Windows Phones Get Cumulative Update KB4074592, PDF Support Now Broken

    Just when you thought Windows 10 Mobile is dead, here’s Microsoft rolling out a new cumulative update for the platform as part of its February patching cycle.

    Windows 10 cumulative update KB4074592, which is also released on PCs running the Creators Update (version 1703) – phones have never received the Fall Creators Update, comes with little changes for mobile devices, though it does something that many users might notice.

    Microsoft doesn’t provide a separate change log for mobile and PC, so the release notes that you can find at the end of the article include all the improvements and security fixes that Microsoft included in KB4074592 for both platforms.

  • Time to Join Extended Long Term Support for Debian 7 Wheezy

    Debian 7 Wheezy LTS period ends on May 31st and some companies asked Freexian if they could get security support past this date. Since about half of the current team of paid LTS contributors is willing to continue to provide security updates for Wheezy, I have started to work on making this possible.

  • Hackers Infiltrated Tesla to Mine Cryptocurrency

    While Elon Musk was busy planning how to launch his Tesla Roadster into the depths of space last month, a hacker was silently using Tesla’s computing power to mine an unknown amount of cryptocurrency.

    The unidentified attackers found their way in through cracks in Tesla’s cloud environment, according to a report issued by RedLock security on February 20. The miners were able to gain access via an unprotected Tesla Kubernete console—an open source system that manages applications. Included on this console were the access credentials to Tesla’s Amazon Web Service. Once they obtained access to the console, the attackers were able to run scripts that allowed them to stealthily mine cryptocurrency.

  • Hacking at EPFL Toastmasters, Lausanne, tonight

    ...remember to turn off your mobile device or leave it at home, you never know when it might ring or become part of a demonstration.

  • Mageia Identity Security Breach

    A user was able to gain access to our LDAP database and has published the email addresses and names, as well as apparent password hashes, of anyone who has signed up to identity.mageia.org. However, the published hashes do not match those on record, and all capitalisation has been removed, so it is not clear that the actual passwords have been compromised. All of the passwords have since been reset as a security precaution. New rules have been added to prevent access to the LDAP server. The sysadmins are investigating how the fields were read, as the configuration should have specifically prevented this.

    The passwords stored by the Mageia LDAP server are hashed and salted, meaning that the full decryption of the password, if they have actually been leaked, into a human-usable format would require significant computing power for safe and complex passwords.

Canonical Donates Ubuntu Phones to UBports to Continue Ubuntu Touch Development

Filed under
Ubuntu

UBports devs announced today on Twitter that Canonical sent them a few old Ubuntu Phone devices to continue the development of the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system.

Now that Canonical has ceased the development of its revolutionary Unity 8 user interface for the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system used on smartphones from Meizu and BQ, the company decided to donate several devices to the UBports community.

UBports is recreating Ubuntu Touch, maintaining, updating, and modifying its code to offer the world a free and open source mobile operating system for those who want to use something else than Android, iOS, and what else is still out there.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Server 18.04 LTS Will Default To The New Installer

The New Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Server Installer

LibreOffice 6.1 Arrives in August with Revamped Online Experience, New Features

Filed under
LibO

Last week, we talked with The Document Foundation's marketing assistant Mike Saunders about the 1 million downloads milestone reached by the major LibreOffice 6.0 release in only two weeks after its launch, who told us that the team is already working on the next version, LibreOffice 6.1, due for release in August.

LibreOffice 6.1 will be the first major update to the 6.x series of the office suite and will add yet another layer of new features and improvements to the open-source and cross-platform office suite used by millions of computer users worldwide, and we'd like you to be the first to know about them.

Read more

Open source COM runs mainline Linux on Microchip SAMA5D2 SiP

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Microchip unveiled an open source, mainline Linux ready “SAMA5D27 SOM” module based on a SiP implementation of its Cortex-A5-based SAMA5D27 SoC with 128MB RAM. The 40 x 38mm module is also available with a SOM1-EK1 dev board.

Long before it was acquired by Microchip Technology, Atmel has been producing a line of Linux-focused, Cortex-A5 based SAMA5 SoCs, but the only Atmel-branded SAMA5 boards were its open-spec Xplained development boards developed with Newark Element14. The SAMA5 family was always a side business to Atmel’s MCU line, with very little integration between the two. With its ATSAMA5D27-SOM1 (SAMA5D27 SOM1) module, which uses a system-in-package (SiP) implementation of Microchip’s SAMA5D27 SoC, Microchip is starting to bridge the gap between the SAMA5 product line and its much larger RTOS/MCU business.

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Purism's Linux Phone to Use Convergence for a Unified Experience Across Devices

Filed under
GNU
Linux

For Purism, the company that sells quality computers using a Linux-based operating system and are intended to protect user's privacy and freedom, designing a convergent Linux phone is a long-term goal to unify the mobile experience across various devices.

Purism's François Téchené shares some initial details on how the company plans to use convergence for their short and long-term design goals of Librem 5, the Linux smartphone that raised more than $2 million on Kickstarter last year, saying they're looking to unify the human experience across different device you might own.

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Introducing the potential new Ubuntu Studio Council

Back in 2016, Set Hallström was elected as the new Team Lead for Ubuntu Studio, just in time for the 16.04 Xenial Long Term Support (LTS) release. It was intended that Ubuntu Studio would be able to utilise Set’s leadership skills at least up until the next LTS release in April 2018. Unfortunately, as happens occasionally in the world of volunteer work, Set’s personal circumstances changed and he is no longer able to devote as much time to Ubuntu Studio as he would like. Therefore, an IRC meeting was held between interested Ubuntu Studio contributors on 21st May 2017 to agree on how to fill the void. We decided to follow the lead of Xubuntu and create a Council to take care of Ubuntu Studio, rather than continuing to place the burden of leadership on the shoulder of one particular person. Unfortunately, although the result was an agreement to form the first Ubuntu Studio Council from the meeting participants, we all got busy and the council was never set up. Read more

today's leftovers

  • My Experience with MailSpring on Linux
    On the Linux Desktop, there are quite a few choices for email applications. Each of these has their own pros and cons which should be weighed depending on one’s needs. Some clients will have MS Exchange support. Others do not. In general, because email is reasonably close to free (and yes, we can thank Hotmail for that) it has been a difficult place to make money. Without a cash flow to encourage developers, development has trickled at best.
  • Useful FFMPEG Commands for Managing Audio and Video Files
  • Set Up A Python Django Development Environment on Debian 9 Stretch Linux
  • How To Run A Command For A Specific Time In Linux
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 7
  •  
  • Why Oppo and Vivo are losing steam in Chinese smartphone market
    China’s smartphone market has seen intense competition over the past few years with four local brands capturing more than 60 percent of sales in 2017. Huawei Technologies, Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi Technology recorded strong shipment growth on a year-on-year basis. But some market experts warned that Oppo and Vivo may see the growth of their shipments slow this year as users become more discriminating.
  • iPhones Blamed for More than 1,600 Accidental 911 Calls Since October
    The new Emergency SOS feature released by Apple for the iPhone is the one to blame for no less than 1,600 false calls to 911 since October, according to dispatchers. And surprisingly, emergency teams in Elk Grove and Sacramento County in California say they receive at least 20 such 911 calls every day from what appears to be an Apple service center. While it’s not exactly clear why the iPhones that are probably brought in for repairs end up dialing 911, dispatchers told CBS that the false calls were first noticed in the fall of the last year. Apple launched new iPhones in September 2017 and they went on sale later the same month and in November, but it’s not clear if these new devices are in any way related to the increasing number of accidental calls to 911.
  • Game Studio Found To Install Malware DRM On Customers' Machines, Defends Itself, Then Apologizes
    The thin line that exists between entertainment industry DRM software and plain malware has been pointed out both recently and in the past. There are many layers to this onion, ranging from Sony's rootkit fiasco, to performance hits on machines thanks to DRM installed by video games, up to and including the insane idea that copyright holders ought to be able to use malware payloads to "hack back" against accused infringers. What is different in more recent times is the public awareness regarding DRM, computer security, and an overall fear of malware. This is a natural kind of progression, as the public becomes more connected and reliant on computer systems and the internet, they likewise become more concerned about those systems. That may likely explain the swift public backlash to a small game-modding studio seemingly installing something akin to malware in every installation of its software, whether from a legitimate purchase or piracy.

Server: Benchmarks, IBM and Red Hat

  • 36-Way Comparison Of Amazon EC2 / Google Compute Engine / Microsoft Azure Cloud Instances vs. Intel/AMD CPUs
    Earlier this week I delivered a number of benchmarks comparing Amazon EC2 instances to bare metal Intel/AMD systems. Due to interest from that, here is a larger selection of cloud instance types from the leading public clouds of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.
  • IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History
    Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.
  • Red Hat CSA Mike Bursell on 'managed degradation' and open data
    As part of Red Hat's CTO office chief security architect Mike Bursell has to be informed of security threats past, present and yet to come – as many as 10 years into the future. The open source company has access to a wealth of customers in verticals including health, finance, defence, the public sector and more. So how do these insights inform the company's understanding of the future threat landscape?
  • Red Hat Offers New Decision Management Tech Platform
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has released a platform that will work to support information technology applications and streamline the deployment of rules-based tools in efforts to automate processes for business decision management, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

Vulkan Anniversary and Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers

  • Vulkan Turns Two Years Old, What Do You Hope For Next?
    This last week marked two years since the debut of Vulkan 1.0, you can see our our original launch article. My overworked memory missed realizing it by a few days, but it's been a pretty miraculous two years for this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers
    Noralf Trønnes has spent the past few months working on generic FBDEV emulation for Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) drivers and this week he volleyed his third revision of these patches, which now includes a new in-kernel API along with some clients like a bootsplash system, VT console, and fbdev implementation.