Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 11 Dec 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Rescue your Linux with Elinks text browser Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 6:38am
Story Adiantum File-System Encryption Support Ready For Linux 4.21 Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2018 - 5:42am
Story The PCLinuxOS Magazine Graphics Special Edition, Volume 1 MeeMaw 11/12/2018 - 4:45am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 8:03pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 7:55pm
Story Programming Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 7:51pm
Story Security: Updates, Best VPNs for GNU/Linux, and Google+ Chaos Again Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 7:48pm
Story Linux and Linux Foundation Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 7:33pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 6:39pm
Story Wine-Staging 4.0-RC1 Released With Just Over 800 Patches On Top Of Wine Roy Schestowitz 10/12/2018 - 6:31pm

GNOME and GStreamer

Filed under
GNOME
  • Week 1 of GNOME usability testing

    The Outreachy internship started this week! For this cycle, we are joined by Clarissa, who will help us with usability testing in GNOME.

    I wanted to share our progress in the internship. I hope to provide regular status updates on our work.

  • Web overlay in GStreamer with WPEWebKit

    After a year or two of hiatus I attended the GStreamer conference which happened in beautiful Edinburgh. It was great to meet the friends from the community again and learn about what’s going on in the multimedia world. The quality of the talks was great, the videos are published online as usual in Ubicast. I delivered a talk about the Multimedia support in WPEWebKit, you can watch it there and the slides are also available.

    One of the many interesting presentations was about GStreamer for cloud-based live video. Usually anything with the word cloud would tend to draw my attention away but for some reason I attended this presentation, and didn’t regret it! The last demo presented by the BBC folks was about overlaying Web content on native video streams. It’s an interesting use-case for live TV broadcasting for instance. A web page provides dynamic notifications popping up and down, the web page is rendered with a transparent background and blended over the live video stream. The BBC folks implemented a GStreamer source element relying on CEF for their Brave project.

  • GStreamer’s playbin3 overview for application developers

    Multimedia applications based on GStreamer usually handle playback with the playbin element. I recently added support for playbin3 in WebKit. This post aims to document the changes needed on application side to support this new generation flavour of playbin.

    So, first of, why is it named playbin3 anyway? The GStreamer 0.10.x series had a playbin element but a first rewrite (playbin2) made it obsolete in the GStreamer 1.x series. So playbin2 was renamed to playbin. That’s why a second rewrite is nicknamed playbin3, I suppose Smile

Linux 4.19.8 Released With BLK-MQ Fix To The Recent Data Corruption Bug

Filed under
Linux

Hopefully you can set aside some time this weekend to upgrade to Linux 4.19.8 as there's the BLK-MQ fix in place for the recent "EXT4 corruption issue" that was plaguing many users of Linux 4.19.

Greg Kroah-Hartman just released a number of stable kernel point releases. Linux 4.19.8 has just some minor additions like supporting the ELAN0621 touchpad, quirking all PDP Xbox One gamepads for better support, and some minor fixes... Linux 4.19.8 wouldn't be worthy of a shout-out had it not been for Jens Axboe's BLK-MQ patches part of this release.

Read more

ExTiX 19.0 with Deepin 15.5 Desktop, Refracta snapshot, Calamares 3.2.2 Installer, Kodi 18.0 and kernel 4.20.0-rc4-exton – Build 181208

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I’ve released a new version of ExTiX Deepin today with Calamares 3.2.2 and kernel 4.20.0-rc4-exton. Calamares is an installer framework. By design it is very customizable, in order to satisfy a wide variety of needs and use cases. All packages have been updated to the latest available version as of today. Study all installed packages in ExTiX Deepin Build 181208. ExTiX is based on Debian and Ubuntu 18.10.

Read more

AMDGPU Driver Gets Final Batch Of Features For Linux 4.21

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

A final pull request of new feature material for the AMD Linux graphics drivers was submitted on Friday for the upcoming 4.21 cycle.

The AMDGPU updates for Linux 4.21 from earlier pull requests is already quite notable especially with finally adding FreeSync/Adaptive-Sync support but there is also AMDKFD compute support for Vega 12 and Polaris 12, Adaptive Backlight Management, various other Vega improvements, more xGMI / Vega 20 enablement, and more.

Read more

Security: FUD, SystemD, and Windows

Filed under
Security
  • 'Open-Source' DarthMiner Malware Targets Adobe Pirates with Cryptominer [Ed: Sergiu Gatlan found a way to call malicious proprietary software with holes in it... something about "Open Source"]

    A slightly weird malware strain has been observed using the open source XMRig cryptominer and EmPyre backdoor utilities to target software pirates as reported by Malwarebytes Labs.

  • Bethesda blunders, IRS sounds the alarm, China ransomware, and more

    Linux boot management tool SystemD is once again getting the wrong kind of attention as researchers have spotted another security vulnerability.

    This time, it is an elevation of privilege vulnerability that would potentially let users execute system commands they would otherwise not be authorized to perform.

  • GSX, TZERO, +10 Others Form Open-Source Consortium Focused On Security Token Interoperability And Compliance
  • Iranians indicted in Atlanta city government ransomware attack

    Details leaked by City of Atlanta employees during the ransomware attack, including screenshots of the demand message posted on city computers, indicated that Samsam-based malware was used. A Samsam variant was used in a number of ransomware attacks on hospitals in 2016, with attackers using vulnerable Java Web services to gain entry in several cases. In more recent attacks, including one on the health industry companies Hancock Health and Allscripts, other methods were used to gain access, including Remote Desktop Protocol [attacks] that gave the attackers direct access to Windows systems on the victims' networks.

Imagine 128 & Matrox Linux X.Org Display Drivers See Updates For The 2018 Holidays

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

If you happen to have any Number Nine Imagine 128 or Matrox graphics cards sitting around, there are new Linux X.Org display driver updates out this weekend for these vintage parts.

Should you have an Imagine 128 PCI graphics card still around, the xf86-video-i128 driver has been updated. This new open-source X.Org display driver update has just some compiler/build updates but nothing too exciting unless you just enjoying reminiscing over old display hardware.

Read more

Programming With Python and Node.js in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Development

Raven: An awesome news reader

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

I have used RSS on-again and off-again for many years. It’s a great way to aggregate the news you want to read, from sources all over the web. The problem with it, for me, has always been based on the client. Generally, the user experience and design of them has always been a bit clunky; despite there being tons of them out there.

Also, finding that elusive client that ticks all the boxes, and works for my favourite operating system, seems to be a bit of a unicorn! Readers like FeedReader, Liferea and RSSOwl are alternatives to this new kid on the block.

Read more

ROE Kernel Hardening Continues To Restrict KVM VMs To Only Its Own Memory

Filed under
Linux

For helping to enhance the security of servers running KVM for virtualization, there's been a ROE protection kernel hardening patch series in the works. This new addition to the kernel allows the host operating system to restrict a guest's access strictly to its own memory. It's unclear though yet if the ROE protection will make the cut in time for the upcoming Linux 4.21 kernel cycle.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Episode 9: Humanity, Magic, and Glitter

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Bryan Lunduke about Linux and humanity.

  • FlightGear Flight Simulator 2018.3 Released with New Features

    FlightGear 2018.3 was finally released with many exciting new features, enhancements and bugfixes including usability improvements to the launcher, better visuals for AI and MP aircraft.

  • Linux Rabbit Attacks IoT Devices to Secretly Mine Monero [Ed: Nothing to do with "Linux". Relies on open ports with weak passwords, unlike Windows, which just has intentional back doors.]

    The global cryptocurrency mining malware trend isn’t coming to an end anytime soon. A newly discovered malware strain specifically targets Linux and IoT devices. This is a different approach as most of these attacks focus on Windows devices. Researchers are concerned this new mining software will only make cryptojacking an even bigger problem. Known as Linux Rabbit, this software kit packs quite the punch.

  • Linux Rabbit and Rabbot Malware Leveraged to Install Cryptominers [Ed: They even called it “Linux Rabbit”; could just call it "WeakPassword Rabbit”]

Linux Foundation on Compliance and Openwashing Examples

Filed under
OSS
Legal
  • A new ACT for open source compliance from The Linux Foundation

    What’s new in the world of open source? The Linux Foundation announced that they are launching a new tooling project for improving open source compliance. This new project’s goal is to ensure that when using open source projects, users understand what they are complying with.

    The Linux Foundation continues to be a leading beacon in the FOSS world, with worldwide events and over one million professionals enrolled in their free training courses. Just some of the successful projects that the Linux Foundation hosts include Rook, Node.js, Kubernetes, and Linkerd (which just got a fancy new UI makeover). You don’t have to look far to see names and noteworthy tools that you’re familiar with!

  • The Linux Foundation forms new Automated Compliance Tooling project

    “There are numerous open source compliance tooling projects but the majority are unfunded and have limited scope to build out robust usability or advanced features,” said Kate Stewart, senior director of strategic programs at The Linux Foundation. “We have also heard from many organizations that the tools that do exist do not meet their current needs. Forming a neutral body under The Linux Foundation to work on these issues will allow us to increase funding and support for the compliance tooling development community.”

    As part of the announcement, ACT is also welcoming two new projects that will be hosted at the Linux Foundation: OpenChain, a project that identifies key recommended processes for open-source management; and the Open Compliance Project, which will educate and help developers and companies better understand license requirements.

  • A Closer Look At Tesla's Open-Source Patent Pledge
  • Why Amazon's customer obsession should make it more open source friendly [Ed: What "customer obsession"? Amazon is a surveillance company whose biggest AWS customer is the CIA (with which it shares tons of data from all around the world).]

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Crossplane

    With the release of open-source multi-cloud management interface Crossplane, cloud services developer Upbound wants to provide an open and consistent way to handle integrations with whichever cloud platforms you throw at it.

    “Crossplane presents a declarative management style API that covers a wide range of portable abstractions including databases, message queues, buckets, data pipelines, serverless, clusters, and many more coming,” Upbound CEO Bassam Tabbara wrote in a blog post. “It’s based on the declarative resource model of the popular Kubernetes project, and applies many of the lessons learned in container orchestration to multicloud workload and resource orchestration.”

  • JD.com And Open Source Technology Development

    Currently running the largest Kubernetes cluster in the world, JD.com has demonstrated how companies can use data infrastructures in new and innovative ways. One of the first companies to shift to Kubernetes, Jingdong has since been able to forge partnerships with other companies, including CNCF, to create even stronger relationships with IT developers, users, and software companies. Because of this, open source development has started to become a much bigger aspect of many company’s IT plans.

    Due to its commitment to innovation, Jingdong recently became a platinum end user member of CNCF, meaning the company now has a spot on the governance board. This will now allow Jingdong to have a say in the direction of future Foundation initiatives. As a result, increased efficiency, reduced costs, and higher levels of customer service will be on display in Jingdong and other companies in the years ahead.

    By using Kubernetes clusters, Jingdong and other companies can now support even wider ranges of IT applications, as well as big data and Artificial Intelligence applications. With these expanded technological options, it will now be possible to reduce silos between DevOP teams and operations personnel. By making the process between these teams even more efficient, JD.com has been able to contribute significant code to many important corporate projects, including Prometheus and Vitess.

  • You want some SUSE socks? We know you do; SUSE x KubeCon.

    Looking for socks? How about a nice, juicy, SUSE chameleon? If you’re going to KubeCon, you can get them. Stop by the SUSE booth, G17, and we’ll hook you up. After you’ve got yourself some socks and your very own SUSE chameleon, head on over to see Rob De Canha-Knight, EMEA Technical Strategist at SUSE, for his birds of a feather session on diversity and inclusion.

  • Welcoming WordPress 5.0 And The New Editor

    The major new version of WordPress scheduled for release today is a big deal, both anticipated and feared by those who rely on the world's most popular web publishing platform.

    WordPress is used by everyone from solo bloggers and small businesses to major publishers (including Forbes) and marketing organizations. Thomas Griffin has written here about How To Use WordPress As A SaaS Platform, the foundation of your own cloud software business. WordPress has a corporate backer, a private company called Automattic, but also benefits from open source code contributions from developers around the world.

    Part of what makes WordPress popular is that its open source foundation means you can get started with it "for free" and, equally important, you can extend or tweak its functionality to make it serve your needs. Editing the core software code is not a good idea because then it becomes challenging to preserve those changes if you ever upgrade, but most of the core functionality can be modified with plugins and themes, software modules that hook into a fairly well documented set of function calls. That is what makes WordPress a software platform, not merely a software product.

  • Basque Country open source ICT sector grows 8%

     

    The Basque Country government is sharing much of its software as open source; in 2017 it started doing this through its OpenApps Euskadi directory.

Play Tetris at your Linux terminal

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

Thanks for joining us for today's installment of the Linux command-line toys advent calendar. If this is your first visit to the series, you might be asking yourself, what’s a command-line toy. Even I'm not quite sure, but generally, it could be a game or any simple diversion that helps you have fun at the terminal.

It's quite possible that some of you will have seen various selections from our calendar before, but we hope there’s at least one new thing for everyone.

I promised when I started this series I'd be including games, but so far I've neglected to, so let's fix that with today's selection: Tetris.

Read more

AMD Adding New Vega 10 & Vega 20 IDs To Their Linux Driver

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

While we are looking forward to AMD's next-gen Navi architecture in 2019, it looks like the Vega family may be getting bigger soon.

Hot off finishing up the Radeon RX 590 Linux support as their new Polaris refresh, it looks like another Vega 20 part may be in the pipeline as well as multiple new Vega 10 SKUs.

Friday afternoon patches to the company's RadeonSI Mesa and AMDKFD/AMDGPU kernel drivers reveal some new PCI IDs. On top of the five "Vega 20" PCI IDs already part of the Linux driver, a 0x66A4 ID is being added. So far AMD has just announced the Radeon Instinct MI50 and MI60 accelerators as being built off Vega 20 with no consumer parts at this time. As with most new product generations, it doesn't necessarily mean AMD will be launching 5~6 Vega 20 products, but sometimes PCI IDs are reserved for pre-production hardware, the possibility of expanding the product line in the future, etc.

Read more

Need a Linux Distro for Deep Learning Applications? Try Ubuntu

Filed under
Development
Ubuntu

If your target market is finance, healthcare, or manufacturing, you know AI, ML, and DL solutions in demand for use cases ranging from fraud detection and cancer screenings to industrial automation. There are also interest and backing for applications including language translation, chatbots and service bots, facial recognition, and self-driving cars. A major challenge that the developer has to overcome with these applications, however, is dealing with massive quantities of unstructured data including image, voice, and sound.

NVIDIA CUDA, which enables general computing on graphical processing units (GPUs), allow developers to increase the speed of their applications. You can use these graphics cards to Ubuntu with traditional PCI slots on motherboards or with external Thunderbolt adapters. In fact, NVIDIA’s DGX Systems for deep learning run on Ubuntu.

Canonical, which produces Ubuntu with the help of its community, has also worked with Google to develop Kubeflow, which simplifies the process of installing AI tools and framework, as well as making it easier to use GPUs.

In addition, Ubuntu’s extensive libraries, tutorials and examples related to AI, ML, and DL make it the preferred OS choice for these applications. Ubuntu is also known for the support it offers for the most recent versions of free open source platforms and software.

Read more

Also: Fresh Snaps from November 2018

Devices That Run or Support GNU/Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Fanless, Kaby Lake industrial PC has IEC 61850-3 power protection

    Lanner’s fanless, Ubuntu-ready “LEC-3340” is a 3U rackmount edge server with 7th Gen Core and Xeon E3 CPUs aimed at power subsystems. It features IEC 61850-3 compliance, -40 to 70°C support, isolated serial interfaces, and ESD protection.

    In the new age of edge and fog computing, the line between embedded and server technology is growing ever fuzzier. Bridging the gap at the high end of our coverage purview is Lanner’s new LEC-3340 Consolidation Server, which despite the 3U rackmount form-factor and the high end Kaby Lake-H or Xeon-E3 foundation, is designed to run without a fan.

  • Rugged Coffee Lake panel-PCs run Intel’s OpenVINO AI toolkit

    IEI’s 15- to 24-inch, IP66-armored “PPC-F-Q370” panel-PCs offer 8th Gen Core CPUs with Intel’s OpenVINO AI toolkit plus 2x GbE, 8x USB 3.0, 4x PCIe, 4x SATA bays, and 2x M.2/NVMe slots.

    IEI announced a new panel-PC series based on Intel’s 8th Gen “Coffee Lake” processors that feature Intel’s OpenVINO toolkit for AI development. Designed for applications including machine vision, facial recognition, and product defect detection, the PPC-F-Q370 series includes 15-, 15.6-, 17-, 18.5-, 21.5-, and 23.8-inch 10-point multitouch PCAP touchscreens with anti-glare and IP66 front-panel protection. No OS support was listed, but Linux and Windows are likely to be supported.

  • Little Backup Box: Small but Useful Improvement

    I want my Raspberry Pi-based Little Backup Box to be simple and reliable. So I prefer not to tweak and enhance it too much. I do make occasional exceptions to that rule, though. Case in point, a Little Backup Box fork by David Mathias that has a few interesting features, including a progress indicator.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Director v1.6.0 is available
    Icinga Director v1.6.0 has been released with Multi-Instance Support, Configuration Baskets and improved Health Checks. We’re excited to announce new features that will help you to work more efficiently.
  • Fedora Looks To Build Firefox With Clang For Better Performance & Compilation Speed
    Following the move by upstream Mozilla in switching their Linux builds of Firefox from being compiled by GCC to LLVM Clang, Fedora is planning the same transition of compilers in the name of compilation speed and resulting performance. FESCo Ticket 2020 laid out the case, "Mozilla upstream switches from gcc to clang and we're going to follow upstream here due to clang performance, maintenance costs and compilation speed. Tom Stellard (clang maintainer) has asked me to file this ticket to comply with Fedora processes."
  • Work in progress: PHP stack for EL-8
  • Sandwich-style SBC offers four 10GbE SFP+ ports
    SolidRun’s “ClearFog CX 8K” SBC is built around a “CEx7 A8040” COM Express Type 7 module that runs Linux on a quad -A72 Armada A8040. Features include 4x 10GbE SFP+ ports and mini-PCIe, M.2, and SATA expansion. In August, SolidRun updated its ClearFog line of Linux-driven router boards with a high-end ClearFog GT 8K SBC with the same 2GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 Marvell Armada A8040 SoC found on its MacchiatoBIN Double Shot Mini-ITX board. Now, the company has returned to the headless (no graphics) Armada A8040 with the ClearFog CX 8K. [..] It’s rare to see an Arm-based Type 7 module.
  • Watch Out: Clicking “Check for Updates” Still Installs Unstable Updates on Windows 10
    Microsoft hasn’t learned its lesson. If you click the “Check for Updates” button in the Settings app, Microsoft still considers you a “seeker” and will give you “preview” updates that haven’t gone through the normal testing process. This problem came to everyone’s attention with the release of the October 2018 Update. It was pulled for deleting people’s files, but anyone who clicked “Check for Updates” in the first few days effectively signed up as a tester and got the buggy update. The “Check for Updates” button apparently means “Please install potentially updates that haven’t gone through a normal testing process.”

OSS Leftovers

  • DAV1D v0.1 AV1 Video Decoder Released
    Out today is DAV1D as the first official (v0.1) release of this leading open-source AV1 video decoder. This release was decided since its quality is good enough for use, covers all AV1 specs and features, and is quite fast on desktop class hardware and improving for mobile SoCs.
  • PikcioChain plans for open-source MainNet in roadmap update
    France-based PikcioChain, a platform designed to handle and monetize personal data, has announced changes to its development roadmap as it looks towards the launch of its standalone MainNet and block explorer in the first quarter of 2019.
  • New Blockstream Bitcoin Block Explorer Announces The Release Of Its Open Source Code Esplora
    Blockstream has just announced a release of Esplora, its open source software. This is the software that keeps the website and network running. This new release follows on the heels of its block explorer that was released in November to the public. The company released the block explorer, and after making sure it was successful, released the code behind that block explorer. This way, developers can easily create their block explorers, build add-ons and extensions as well as contribute to Blockstream.info.
  • Will Concerns Break Open Source Containers?
    Open source containers, which isolate applications from the host system, appear to be gaining traction with IT professionals in the U.S. defense community. But for all their benefits, security remains a notable Achilles’ heel for a couple of reasons. First, containers are still fairly nascent, and many administrators are not yet completely familiar with their capabilities. It’s difficult to secure something you don’t completely understand. Second, containers are designed in a way that hampers visibility. This lack of visibility can make securing containers extremely taxing.
  • Huawei, RoboSense join group pushing open-source autonomous driving technology
    Telecommunications equipment giant Huawei Technologies, its semiconductor subsidiary HiSilicon and RoboSense, a maker of lidar sensors used in driverless cars, have become the first Chinese companies to help establish an international non-profit group that supports open-source autonomous driving projects. The three firms are among the more than 20 founding members of the Autoware Foundation, which aims to promote collaboration between corporate and academic research efforts in autonomous driving technology, according to a statement from the group on Monday. The foundation is an outgrowth of Autoware.AI, an open-source autonomous driving platform that was started by Nagoya University associate professor Shinpei Kato in 2015.
  • 40 top Linux and open source conferences in 2019
    Every year Opensource.com editors, writers, and readers attend open source-related conference and events hosted around the world. As we started planning our 2019 schedules, we rounded up a few top picks for the year. Which conferences do you plan to attend in 2019? If you don't see your conference on this list, be sure to tell us about it in the comments and add it to our community conference calendar. (And for more events to attend, check out The Enterprisers Project list of business leadership conferences worth exploring in 2019.)
  • Adding graphics to the Windows System for Linux [Ed: CBS is still employing loads of Microsoft boosters like Simon Bisson, to whom "Linux" is just something for Microsoft to swallow]/
  • Kong launches its fully managed API platform [Ed: Typical openwashing of APIs, even using the term "open source" where it clearly does not belong]g
  • How Shared, Open Data Can Help Us Better Overcome Disasters
    WHEN A MASSIVE earthquake and tsunami hit the eastern coast of Japan on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant failed, leaking radioactive material into the atmosphere and water. People around the country as well as others with family and friends in Japan were, understandably, concerned about radiation levels—but there was no easy way for them to get that information. I was part of a small group of volunteers who came together to start a nonprofit organization, Safecast, to design, build, and deploy Geiger counters and a website that would eventually make more than 100 million measurements of radiation levels available to the public. We started in Japan, of course, but eventually people around the world joined the movement, creating an open global data set. The key to success was the mobile, easy to operate, high-quality but lower-cost kit that the Safecast team developed, which people could buy and build to collect data that they might then share on the Safecast website.

Security: Updates, Ransomware, and DNS Blame Misplaced

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Ransomware still dominates the global threat landscape
     

    Ransomware attacks continues as the main world’s main security threat and the most profitable form of malware, but a new global report indicates that despite “copious” numbers of infections daily there’s emerging signs the threat is no longer growing.  

  • Someone messed with Linux.org's DNS to deface the website's homepage [Ed: That's not "deface"' but more like redirect and it's not the site's DNS system but something upstream, another company that's at fault]
    SO IMAGINE YOU REALLY LOVE OPEN SOURCE; you've poured yourself a glass of claret from a wine box and have settled into a night of perusing Linux.org. You feel a tingle of excitement as you type in the URL - you're old skool - but that sours to despair as you see a defaced website greet your eyes. Yep, it looks like someone managed to get into the Linux.org website's domain name service (DNS) settings and point the domain to another server that served up a defaced webpage, which depending on when you may have accessed it, greeted visitors with racial slurs, an obscene picture and a protest against the revised Linux kernel developer code of conduct.

Tails 3.11 and Tor Transparency (Financials)