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Thursday, 22 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 5:14pm
Story Security: Intel, Editors and Windows in Critical Systems Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 5:10pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 5:05pm
Story Manjaro 17.1.6 Hakoila Plasma - A rollercoaster of Tux Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 4:59pm
Story GStreamer 1.14 Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 4:55pm
Story The Top 10 Advantages Ubuntu Has Over Windows Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 4:53pm
Story Games: HTC VIVE, GOG, Ray-Tracing, Android and More Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 4:33pm
Story Porting Fedora to RISC-V Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 4:04pm
Story First impressions of the Gemini PDA Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 3:58pm
Story Openwashing: Attivio, Networking, and Black Duck Roy Schestowitz 20/03/2018 - 3:03pm

Linux Foundation LFCS: Ahmed Alkabary

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I always knew about Linux as an alternative to Windows, but never really got to experience it until 2011. I decided to buy a new laptop, and the laptop that stood out for me had Linux pre-installed on it. I remember well the pre-installed distribution was openSUSE. I was hesitant to buy it as I had no experience with Linux whatsoever, but I thought to myself, Well, I can just install windows on it if I don't like it. Once I booted the system and saw how fast and neat everything was, I thought it is a message from the Linux gods.

It's really weird because on my first day I felt that Linux was meant for me not just as an operating system to use, but I felt my life will be centered around Linux from that day.

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Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon will open apps a lot faster

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The Linux Mint development team plans to launch the next version of the popular Linux distribution Linux Mint in the coming months.

Linux Mint 19 will be offered in multiple flavors including MATE, Xfce and Cinnamon. If you have used Linux Mint Cinnamon in the past or plan to take it for a test drive in the future, you may benefit from application loading improvements in the upcoming version of Linux Mint.

A new blog post on the official Linux Mint blog offers some insight. It all began with a perceived feeling; team members noticed that app loading "felt" faster on MATE or Xfce versions of Linux Mint and slower on Cinnamon versions.

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Hands-on with the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

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The new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ was announced and started shipping last week.

Of course, I went straight to the good folks at the Swiss and ordered one, which I received the next day.

So, the first thing on my to-do list is to congratulate and thank both the Pi Foundation and the for their efficiency in making this new model available immediately after announcement.

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Also: You Can Now Transform Your Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ into a Home Theatre System


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  • Linux Foundation announces open source ACRN hypervisor for the Internet of Things

    ACRN's small footprint is partly attributable to the fact that it takes a mere 25,000 lines of code for a hypervisor. There's already involvement from the likes of ADLINK, Aptiv, Intel Corporation, LG Electronics and Neusoft Corporation, and it's likely that many more names will join this list.

  • Linux Foundation Announces ACRN —Open Source Hypervisor for IoT Devices

    The Linux Foundation announced a new project called ACRN (pronounced "acorn") that will provide generic code for the creation of hypervisors for IoT devices.

    A hypervisor is computer code for creating and running virtual machines. Project ACRN aims to provide a generic structure for an IoT-specific hypervisor component.

    The Linux Foundation says it built ACRN to be fully-customizable, and as such, the project is comprised of two main components: the hypervisor itself and a device model for interacting with the underlying hardware.

  • Linux Foundation backs new ‘ACRN’ hypervisor for embedded and IoT

    The Linux Foundation has announced a new hypervizor for use in embedded and internet of things scenarios.

    Project ACRN (pronounced “acorn”) will offer a “hypervizor, and its device model complete with rich I/O mediators.”

    There’ll also be “a Linux-based Service OS” and the ability to “run guest operating systems (another Linux instance, an RTOS, Android, or other operating systems) simultaneously”.

Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS: What’s New?

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Ahead of the Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS release next month you may be wondering what new features and changes the update will bring.

Well, wonder no more.

In this post we round up all of the key information about the next release of one Ubuntu’s most popular community flavors.

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Wine 3.4 and Vulkan

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  • The WineHQ Wine development release 3.4 is now available for Linux and Mac

    The WineHQ Wine development release 3.4 is now available for Linux and Mac

  • Wine Developers Determining How To Handle Vulkan Loader Support

    While this week's Wine 3.4 release delivers on working Wine Vulkan ICD support for beginning to allow Windows Vulkan programs to work under Wine assuming the host has Vulkan API support, this current implementation still requires the user to install the Windows Vulkan SDK.

    At the moment those wanting to use Windows Vulkan games/applications under Wine still need to download the LunarG Vulkan SDK for Windows in order to obtain the Vulkan loader (DLL) for pairing with Wine's Vulkan ICD driver.

Here’s GNOME 3.28 – See What’s New

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The latest version of GNOME 3 has been released today. Version 3.28 contains six months of work and new features by the GNOME community and comes with many improvements and new features.

One major new feature for this release is automatic downloading of operating systems in Boxes, which takes the work out of creating and running virtual machines – just pick the operating system that you want to create a virtual machine of, and Boxes will now download and install it for you.

Other highlights include improvements to the Calendar and Contacts applications, the ability to star files and folders in the Files application, and improved support for Thunderbolt 3 and Bluetooth LE devices. GNOME’s default UI font has also been overhauled to be more attractive and easy to read, and the on-screen keyboard has been rewritten to be more reliable and has layouts for a number of different locales.

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Also: textures and paintables

LG releases webOS Open Source Edition, looks to expand webOS usage

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LG’s smart TVs ship with an operating system called webOS, which is the latest version of an operating system that was developed by Palm to run on phones, acquired by HP to use with tablets, and eventually sold to LG, which is still using it today.

But now LG wants to expand the adoption of webOS and the company is working with the South Korean government to solicit business proposals from other companies interested in using webOS.

LG has also released a webOS Open Source Edition version of the operating system.

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Test driving 4 open source music players and more

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In my last article, I described my latest music problem: I need an additional stage of amplification to make proper use of my new phono cartridge. While my pre-amplifier contains a phono stage, its gain is only suitable for cartridges that output about 5mV, whereas my new cartridge has a nominal output of 0.4mV.

Based on my investigation, I liked the looks of the Muffsy phono kits, so I ordered the head amplifier, the power supply, and the back panel. I also needed to obtain a case to hold the boards and the back panel, available online from many vendors. Muffsy does not sell the “wall wart” necessary to power the unit, so I ordered one of those from a supplier in California. Finally, inspecting my soldering iron, solder “sucker,” and solder, I’ve realized I need to do better—so a bit more shopping, online or local, is in order there. Finally, for those, like me, whose soldering skills may be rusty and perhaps were not all that great to begin with, Muffsy kindly offers links to two instructional videos.

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Review: ArchMerge 6.4.1

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The distribution I have been asked most frequently to cover so far in 2018 is ArchMerge, an Arch-based project which runs the Xfce desktop environment and can be installed using the Calamares system installer. If the description sounds familiar, it should, as this summary could equally well apply to Archman, SwagArch and one edition of the Revenge OS distribution.

There are two main features which set ArchMerge apart from its close relatives. First, ArchMerge is available in two flavours. The full featured desktop edition ships with three graphical user interfaces (Xfce, Openbox and i3). A second, minimal flavour is available for people who want to start with a text console and build from the ground up.

The other point which helps ArchMerge stand out from the crowd of Arch-based distributions is its documentation. Arch Linux is famous for its detailed wiki, and rightfully so. ArchMerge takes a slightly different approach and, instead of supplying detailed pages for virtually every aspect of the distribution, the project supplies quick overviews and tutorials for common tasks and issues. These overviews are each accompanied by a video which shows the user how to perform the task.

The ArchMerge website places a strong emphasis on learning and the tutorial pages guide visitors through how to install the distribution, how to configure the desktop, how to install additional software and how to set up file synchronizing through Dropbox. There is also a section dedicated to fixing common problems, a sort of FAQ for distribution issues. Since there are videos for the topics covered, we are shown where to go and what each step should look like, rather than just being given a written description.

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Tails 3.6.1 is out

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This release fixes several security issues and users should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Linux 4.9.88, 4.4.122, and 3.18.100, More Security Patches in Linux 4.16

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Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS Will Ship with a New Default Layout Called "Familiar"

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Ubuntu MATE's lead developer Martin Wimpress announced that the forthcoming Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system would sport a brand-new default layout for new installations.

If you plan on installing or reinstalling Ubuntu MATE this spring, the upcoming 18.04 release sports a new default layout called "Familiar." According to Martin Wimpress, the new layout is based on the Traditional layout with the menu-bar replaced by Brisk Menu, which was used in previous Ubuntu MATE releases.

The decision to replace the Traditional layout with the Familiar one was taken due to some technical issues when the development team tried to update it for Ubuntu MATE 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver). Traditional will still be available, but not enabled by default, and bears no changes.

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Atom 1.25

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  • Atom 1.25

    Atom 1.25 has been released on our stable channel and includes GitHub package improvements, improved syntax highlighting and code folding, Python and HTML language improvements and more.

  • GitHub's Atom Hackable Text Editor Gets Performance, Responsiveness Improvements

    GitHub released a new stable version of their open-source and cross-platform Atom hackable text editor with a bunch of enhancements, bug fixes, a new Electron version, as well as performance and responsiveness improvements.

    Atom 1.25 is now available for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows platforms, and it is packed with improvements for the GitHub package to let you stage and view changes affecting file mode modifications, additions to symbolic links, as well as the ability for the Diff view to no longer reset its scrolling position.

Linux Mint 19 'Tara' Cinnamon will be faster

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Is Linux Mint slow? Hell, no! The operating system is plenty fast. Speed is in the eye of the beholder, however, and the Mint developers apparently thought app-launching seemed slow when using the Cinnamon desktop environment. They didn't have any proof, but they felt that both Mate and Xfce were faster in this regard.

Well, rather than allow their feelings to remain unproven, the Mint devs decided to come up with a speed test to see if they were correct. Guess what? They were! Windows build time was four times slower with Cinnamon compared to Metacity, while recovery time was nearly four times slower too. So yes, app-launching on Cinnamon -- as of today -- is slow comparatively. The big benefit to pinpointing a problem, however, is that it is the first step in solving it. And so, Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon will be faster as a result.

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antiX-17.1 released

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antiX-17.1 (Heather Heyer) released

This is primarily an upgrade of antiX-17 with a new Meltdown/Spectre patched kernel and a few new applications for users to enjoy.

As usual we offer the following completely systemd-free flavours for both 32 and 64 bit architecture.

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Ubuntu: Logic Supply and Linux 4.15/Linux 4.16

  • Tiny Apollo Lake based mini-PCs run Ubuntu
    Logic Supply unveiled two 116 x 83 x 34mm mini-PCs built around a Celeron N3350: a CL200 with 3x USB ports and a CL210 that doubles memory to 2GB LPDDR4 and 32GB eMMC, and adds a second mini-DP and GbE port. Logic Supply announced its smallest mini-PCs to date with CL200 and CL210 models that measure just 116 x 83 x 34mm. The CL200 ships with Ubuntu 16.04 while the more advanced CL210 also offers Windows 10 IoT. Both of these “IoT Edge Device” mini-PCs tap Intel’s dual-core, 1.1GHz Celeron N3350 with 6W TDP from the Apollo Lake generation, and support digital media, data acquisition, automation, and network gateway applications.
  • Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Continues Prepping With The Linux 4.15 Kernel
    There were various calls by independent end-users voicing their two cents that Ubuntu 18.04 "Bionic Beaver" should ship with Linux 4.16 instead of Linux 4.15, but that isn't going to happen. In several different places the past few weeks I've seen various remarks made of how "Ubuntu 18.04 should ship with Linux 4.16" on the basis of either better Spectre/Meltdown support, Linux 4.16 will be out in time and neither 4.15 or 4.16 are even LTS releases, better hardware support, or users simply wanting all the goodies in Linux 4.16. But that's simply foolish given Ubuntu 18.04 is being a Long Term Support release and how close the timing ends up being as is.
  • Kernel Team summary: March 21, 2018
    On the road to 18.04 we have a 4.15 based kernel in the Bionic repository.

Graphics: mesa 17.3.7, mesa 18.0.0-rc5, VGA_Switcheroo and More

  • mesa 17.3.7
    Mesa 17.3.7 is now available.
  • Mesa 17.3.7 Released With A Bunch Of Fixes
    While Mesa 18.0 should finally be out on Friday as the major quarterly update to the Mesa 3D drivers, Mesa 17.3.7 is out today and it's a rather big update for being just another point release to last month's 17.3 series. Last week marked the release candidate of Mesa 17.3.7 with 50+ changes and then on Monday came a second release candidate given all the extra patches.
  • mesa 18.0.0-rc5
    The fifth and final release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available.
  • Mesa 18.0-RC5 Released, Mesa 18.0 Should Finally Be Out On Friday
    Nearly one and a half months since Mesa 18.0-RC4 and nearly one month since last seeing any Git activity on the "18.0" Mesa Git branch, it's finally been updated today with the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC5. Mesa release manager Emil Velikov announced this long-awaited release candidate today. He says this is the fifth and final release candidate. Given the month plus since the last RC, there are many fixes/changes in this release: In fact, more than 80 changes in total for Mesa 18.0-RC5.
  • Improved VGA_Switcheroo Going Into Linux 4.17
    Google's Sean Paul has sent in the final drm-misc-next pull request to DRM-Next of new feature material for the upcoming Linux 4.17 kernel cycle. Most notable with this final drm-misc-next update is the recent VGA_Switcheroo improvements by Lukas Wunner. This is the device link
  • AMD Posts Open-Source Driver Patches For Vega 12
    It's been a while since last hearing anything about the rumored "Vega 12" GPU but coming out this morning are a set of 42 patches providing support for this unreleased GPU within the mainline Linux kernel. Alex Deucher of AMD's Linux driver team sent out the 42 patches this morning providing initial support for Vega 12 within the AMDGPU DRM kernel driver.
  • DXVK Now Has An On-Disk Shader Cache
    DXVK, the exciting project implementing the Direct3D 11 API over Vulkan for Wine gamers, now has an on-disk shader cache.
  • Freedreno's MSM DRM Driver Continues Prepping For Adreno 600 Series Support
    Rob Clark has submitted the MSM DRM driver changes to DRM-Next for the Linux 4.17 kernel for benefiting Qualcomm SoC owners. Changes this cycle for the open-source MSM DRM driver include DSI updates, fixing some race conditions, DebugFS enhancements, MDP5 fixes, and refactoring/prep work for the Adreno 600 series support.
  • NVIDIA's Jetson TK1 Is Being EOL'ed Next Month
    Easily one of our favorite ARM single-board computers ever, the Jetson TK1 from NVIDIA, will be facing retirement next month. A Phoronix reader has tipped us off that NVIDIA has sent out their EOL notice that shipments of the Jetson TK1 developer kits will be ending by the end of April. Following that, it will just live on until distributors run out of their inventory.

Slax Linux Distribution Begins Planning For Its First 2018 Release

Arriving last Christmas was a rejuvenated release of Slax, the long-running, lightweight Linux distribution with its development restarting last year and having shifted from being a Slackware derivative to Debian and moving from KDE to Fluxbox+Compton. Those involved are working on a new Slax release for 2018. Slax lead developer Tomas Matejicek has announced work is underway on the next version of this modern Slax OS with Debian+Fluxbox. Read more Original: Work in progress on next version

Games: The Pillars of the Earth, Steam, Mighty Fight Federation, Civilization VI: Rise and Fall