Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Mozilla News

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • No-Judgment Digital Definitions: App vs Web App

    Just when you think you’ve got a handle on this web stuff, things change. The latest mixup? Apps vs Web Apps. An app should be an app no matter what, but there is a difference between the two. Let’s find out what it is.

  • Friend of Add-ons: Viswaprasath Ks

    Please meet our newest Friend of Add-ons, Viswaprasanth Ks! Viswa began contributing to Mozilla in January 2013, when he met regional community members while participating in a Firefox OS hackathon in Bangalore, India. Since then, he has been a member of the Firefox Student Ambassador Board, a Sr. Firefox OS app reviewer, and a Mozilla Rep and Tech Speaker.

    In early 2017, Viswa began developing extensions for Firefox using the WebExtensions API. From the start, Viswa wanted to invite his community to learn this framework and create extensions with him. At community events, he would speak about extension development and help participants build their first extensions. These presentations served as a starting point for creating the Activate campaign “Build Your Own Extension.” Viswa quickly became a leader in developing the campaign and testing iterations with a variety of different audiences. In late 2017, he collaborated with community members Santosh Viswanatham and Trishul Goel to re-launch the campaign with a new event flow and more learning resources for new developers.

  • Virtual Reality at the Intersection of Art & Technology

    This is the second video in our four part series around creators, virtual reality, and the open web. As we laid out in the opening post of this series, virtual reality is more than a technology, and it is far more than mere eye-candy. VR is an immensely powerful tool that is honed and developed every day. In the hands of a creator, that tool has the potential to transport audiences into new worlds and provide new perspectives.

  • Hello wasm-pack!

    As Lin Clark emphasizes in her article about Rust and WebAssembly: the goal of WebAssembly is not to replace JavaScript, but to be an awesome tool to use with JavaScript. Lots of amazing work has been done to simplify crossing the language boundary between JavaScript and WebAssembly, and you can read all about that in Alex Crichton’s post on wasm-bindgen. This post focuses on a different type of JavaScript/Rust integration: package ecosystem and developer workflows.

Ubuntu: IoT OS of choice is Linux, Shirts, Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Eclipse 2018 survey: The IoT landscape, what it empirically looks like

    Every year the Eclipse Foundation along with other sponsors conduct an online survey of the IoT market looking at what technologies are being used and how. The 2018 edition of that survey has just been made available and I thought it would be a great idea to look at some of the overarching trends.

    [...]

    The IoT OS of choice is Linux

    According to the 2018 respondents, the overwhelming choice for their IoT operating system (OS) is Linux with a commanding 71%, the top 3 choices being Raspbian, Ubuntu, or Debian. Interestingly all of these systems are closely related with Raspbian and Ubuntu both being somewhat based on Debian. What may be more interesting is that all 3 of these distributions can run Snaps, the next-generation packaging format designed from the ground up with security, robustness, and upgradeability in mind – all key aspects for anyone looking to create or use IoT devices.

  • Official Ubuntu 18.04 T-Shirt Goes on Sale

    The official Ubuntu 18.04 LTS 'Bionic Beaver' t-shirt has been added to Caonical's online shop. The dark grey shirt carries the bionic beaver mascot in orange.

  • Linux Shirt Penguin Remix
  • Welcome To The (Ubuntu) Bionic Age: Behind communitheme: interviewing Mads

    My name is Mads Rosendahl (MadsRH) and I’m from Denmark. My dayjob has two sides, half the time I work as a teacher at a school of music and the other half I work in PR (no, not pull requests Wink ) where I do things like brochures, ads, website graphics, etc.

    I’m no saint - I use OSX, Windows and Linux.

    I got involved with Ubuntu back when everything was brown - around 7.10. When I read about Ubuntu, Linux and how Mark Shuttleworth fits into the story, a fire was lit inside me and I wanted to give something back to this brilliant project. In the beginning I set out to make peoples desktops brown and pretty by posting wallpaper suggestions to the artwork mailing list.

    Because I can’t write any code, I mostly piggyback on awesome people in the community, like when I worked on the very first slideshow in Ubiquity installer with Dylan McCall.

    I attended UDS in Dallas back in 2009 (an amazing experience!) and have had to take a long break from contributing. This theme work is my first contribution since then.

Oracle Enterprise Linux 7.5 Debuts with Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 4

Filed under
Linux

Oracle Enterprise Linux 7 Update 5 is now available for download for the x86_64 (64-bit) hardware architecture and brings with it Oracle's Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Release 4 kernel (kernel-uek-4.1.12-112.16.4.el7uek) and a Red Hat Enterprise Linux compatible kernel (kernel-3.10.0-862.el7). Oracle noted that fact that Oracle Enterprise Linux 7.5 remains compatible with apps that have already been certified for the Oracle Linux 7 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

"Oracle Linux maintains user space compatibility with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), which is independent of the kernel version that underlies the operating system. Existing applications in user space will continue to run unmodified on Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 with the UEK Release 4 and no re-certifications are needed for applications already certified with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 or Oracle Linux 7," said Avi Miller, Product Management Director, Oracle Linux.

Read more

Also: Oracle Ships GraalVM 1.0 To "Run Programs Faster Anywhere"

Trisquel 8.0 Arrives Of The 100% Libre Linux OS, Using MATE & Powered By Linux 4.4

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Four years after the debut of Trisquel 7.0 and a year and a half since the 8.0 Alpha, Trisquel 8.0.0 is now available for this Linux distribution that's endorsed by the Free Software Foundation.

Along with gNewSense, PureOS, and a few others, Trisquel is among the few Linux distributions approved by the Free Software Foundation for meeting their free software requirements. Trisquel 8.0 continues this trend in being "100%" committed to free software.

Read more

RADV vs. AMDVLK Vulkan Drivers Continue Stiff Performance Battle

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With the RADV Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver continuing to be advanced by Valve and other independent developers while AMD continues with open-source code drops of their official AMDVLK Vulkan driver, it's been a friendly open-source Radeon Vulkan driver performance and feature/extension battle since that official AMD Vulkan driver was opened up at the end of last year. With new AMDVLK/XGL/PAL code drops happening about weekly and RADV continuing to receive new feature/performance work every few days, both drivers continue maturing gracefully as shown by our latest performance benchmarks.

Read more

Canonical Needs Your Help to Test GNOME Memory Leak Patches in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

The latest GNOME 3.28 desktop environment release contained a major memory leak in the GNOME Shell user interface component, but it was quickly addressed so that it won't affect users considering the fact that most Linux OSes distribute the latest GNOME desktop packages once the first point release is available, in this case GNOME 3.28.1.

As Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) is shipping with the latest GNOME 3.28 desktop environment by default, it was apparent that it will include all the upstream patches released by the GNOME Project to address any memory leaks. Canonical already successfully tested the new patches, but it needs to get wider testing and feedback as soon as possible before the final release on April 26.

Read more

GNOME 3.30 "Almeria" Desktop Environment Development Officially Kicks Off

Filed under
GNOME

GNOME 3.29.1 is the first development snapshot of the forthcoming GNOME 3.30 desktop environment, which is dubbed "Almeria" after the host city of the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) 2018 event later this year, and it brings a few updated core components and apps, but without any significant changes.

"There are actually not very many changes to GNOME modules themselves, because not many maintainers provided updated tarballs, but there are new versions for a few applications and libraries," said Michael Catanzaro on behalf of the GNOME Release Team. "Notably, GNOME Shell was not updated in this release, which is a bit sad."

Read more

8 Ways Linux Is Taking Over the World

Filed under
Linux

Clearly, Linux is everywhere. In this article, we not even touched on “fun” everyday uses such as smart TVs, Roku sticks, Nest thermostats, Kindle e-readers, and all the rest.

And even though we’ve only listed eight unusual uses, the wide variety of the examples will hopefully give you an appreciation for how widespread the operating system is.

Read more

Games: Without Escape, Rise of the Tomb Raider, Monster Crown, Heckpoint and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Point & click horror game 'Without Escape' to have Linux support, launching April 24th

    Feeling brave? Point and click horror game Without Escape might test that a little and it's heading to Linux.

    Without Escape is inspired by first-person adventure games like Myst which used pre-rendered backgrounds and full-motion video, only Without Escape is going down with the horror theme with an "oppressive atmosphere".

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider for Linux to release tomorrow, April 19th

    The moment many have been waiting for, Feral Interactive have just announced that Rise of the Tomb Raider for Linux will release tomorrow, April 19th. As a reminder, this title will be using Vulkan.

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration Launches on Linux on April 19

    UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive announced on Wednesday that it plans to launch the Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration action-adventure video game on the Linux platform on April 19, 2018.

    Feral Interactive already released their macOS port of Rise of the Tomb Raider: 20 Year Celebration on April 12, 2018, and it promised to launch the Linux port too in the coming weeks. Well, the wait is now almost over and Linux gamers will be able to play the famous video game on their favorite GNU/Linux distributions on April 19.

  • Rise of the Tomb Raider Launching Tomorrow For Linux

    Feral Interactive has just announced they will be launching Rise of the Tomb Raider for Linux tomorrow, 19 April.

    Feral has tweeted that this Vulkan-powered Linux game port will be released on Thursday.

    System requirements have yet to be revealed, but of course we'll certainly be interested in seeing what they recommend and will certainly be delivering many Radeon/NVIDIA Linux gaming benchmarks of this game on launch day.

  • Monster taming game 'Monster Crown' has smashed multiple stretch goals, Linux demo out for backers

    I'm pretty excited for Monster Crown, the new monster taming game with inspirations taken from Pokemon and other monster capturing related games. The Kickstarter has done very well and there's now a Linux demo for backers.

  • Heckpoint is a side-scroller where literally everything can be destroyed, Linux port is planned

    I recently came across the side-scrolling action game Heckpoint [Official Site, Steam] and I fell a little in love, the good news is that it's coming to Linux. What's interesting about it, is that quite literally everything you see can be destroyed. It's like an even more insane version of Broforce and that makes me happy.

  • Get your terminal ready to hack the planet in Off Grid with a new trailer, confirmed for same-day Linux release

    I haven't actually been following it closely, something I aim to fix as it seems like a game I would enjoy. The developer has been testing Linux early-on in the development of it too, with them sharing a shot of it running on Linux back in 2016. They've recently put up a new gameplay teaser and they re-confirmed to me that Linux will indeed be a same-day release—heck, their Tweet even has a "#linuxgames" tag in it.

  • The Linux version of RUINER is now on GOG, with 50% off

    Those waiting for the awesome new Linux port of RUINER from GOG will be happy, as it just landed with a discount too. If you pick it up now you can get 50% off.

    Just be aware the current Linux build available on GOG is not their usual installer, but instead a rather large (14GB) tar.gz file. I understand that their normal installer package is coming as well.

A look at KompoZer Web-editor in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

Some people code HTML/CSS oldskool in software like Atom, Notepadqq, or even nano/vi, but others enjoy using what’s called a WYSIWYG editor, which stands for What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get.

KompoZer, is a free cross-platform WYSIWYG editor worth looking at despite the fact that it has not been updated for a very long time. Note though that KompoZer lacks support for features like HTML5 or CSS3 that were introduced after the last version of the HTML editor was released.

As is the case with a lot, but not all, of software in GNU/Linux systems that people use, KompoZer is technically multi-platform, but I would say that the GNU/Linux and MacOS user share dominate the Windows one, from my experience.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Retro-inspired racer Horizon Chase Turbo announced with Linux support

    Aquiris Game Studio, developer of FPS Ballistic Overkill has announced their retro-inspired racing game Horizon Chase Turbo [Official Site].

    It's actually a revamp of an older title of their's named Horizon Chase World Tour, only this time it's not locked to mobile platforms and it will be getting a Linux version too! Honestly, it looks like a really fantastic attempt to bring out a classic-style racing game for a new generation of players.

  • RUINER officially released for Linux on Steam, coming to GOG soon

    RUINER, the absolutely brutal and damn fun action game is now out of beta and officially available on Steam, with a GOG release to follow. I have it confirmed from my GOG contacts it will land soonish, but if you doubt my own word, the developer said so on the Steam forum as well.

    I already wrote some thoughts up on the game here, so I won't reiterate too much. As it stands, it's an excellent action game full of character customisation with tons of perks you can activate and deactivate any time, brutal take-downs and plenty of blood.

  • Red Hat Summit 2018: Learn how other developers are producing cloud-native applications

    Want insights into how other organizations are building cloud-native applications and microservices? At Red Hat Summit 2018, developers from a number of different companies will be sharing their stories in break-out sessions, lightning talks, and birds-of-a-feather discussions. Learn how they solved real business problems using containers, microservices, API management, integration services, and other middleware.

  • Analyst’s Trends to observe: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • TeX Live 2018 for Debian

    TeX Live 2018 has hit Debian/unstable today. The packages are based on what will be (most likely, baring any late desasters) on the TeX Live DVD which is going to press this week. This brings the newest and shiniest version of TeX Live to Debian. There have

  • alioth deprecation - next steps

    As you should be aware, alioth.debian.org will be decommissioned with the EOL of wheezy, which is at the end of May. The replacement for the main part of alioth, git, is alive and out of beta, you know it as salsa.debian.org. If you did not move your git repository yet, hurry up, time is running out.

  • Linux-ready computer monitors condition of industrial equipment

    Adlink’s rugged, Ubuntu-friendly “MCM-100” is a condition monitoring system for industrial machines that offers an Intel Apollo Lake SoC and a 24-bit analog sampling input for up to 128kS/s frequencies.

  • Gear Sport update brings new features with Tizen version 3.0.0.2

    Samsung want you to know that they are serious about their wearable devices, and one way of showing the “Love” is continued development and support. Support can come in many forms and one of the best for end-users software updates.

  • Solaris 11.4 Beta Updated With Spectre V1 Mitigation, Systemd Bit To Make GNOME Happy
  • Chrome 66 rolling out on Mac, Windows, Linux w/ media autoplay restrictions, password export

    Chrome 66 is rolling out today on Mac, Windows, and Linux with a number of user-facing features and policy changes that have been in development for the past several months. This includes new media autoplay behavior, blocking third-party software, and other security changes.

Servers: Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0, 'Cloud' CNCF, Cloud Foundry

Filed under
Server
  • Docker Enterprise Edition 2.0 Launches With Secured Kubernetes

    After months of development effort, Kubernetes is now fully supported in the stable release of the Docker Enterprise Edition.

    Docker Inc. officially announced Docker EE 2.0 on April 17, adding features that have been in development in the Docker Community Edition (CE) as well as enhanced enterprise grade capabilities. Docker first announced its intention to support Kubernetes in October 2017. With Docker EE 2.0, Docker is providing a secured configuration of Kubernetes for container orchestration.

    "Docker EE 2.0 brings the promise of choice," Docker Chief Operating Officer Scott Johnston told eWEEK. "We have been investing heavily in security in the last few years, and you'll see that in our Kubernetes integration as well."

  • The Agony and the Ecstasy of Cloud Billing [Ed: There’s no such thing as "cloud". In this particular context it just means server space rental.]

    Back in the mists of antiquity when I started reading Linux Journal, figuring out what an infrastructure was going to cost was (although still obnoxious in some ways) straightforward. You'd sign leases with colocation providers, buy hardware that you'd depreciate on a schedule and strike a deal in blood with a bandwidth provider, and you were more or less set until something significant happened to your scale.

  • Making the Most Out of Microservices with Service Mesh

    In this article, we talk with Andrew Jenkins, Lead Architect at Aspen Mesh, about moving from monolithic apps to microservices and cut through some of the hype around service mesh for managing microservice architectures. For more on service mesh, consider attending KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU, May 2-4, 2018 in Copenhagen, Denmark.

  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Definitions

    In the first article in our series on the Cloud Foundry for Developers training course, we explained what Cloud Foundry is and how it's used. We continue our journey here with a look at some basic terms. Understanding the terminology is the key to not being in a constant state of bewilderment, so here are the most important terms and concepts to know for Cloud Foundry.

  • What’s the Value of CI/CD?

Security: Russia, Librem, and Apple's Faux Security

Filed under
Security
  • U.S. & U.K. Issue Joint Warning About Risks of Russian Cyberattacks
  • Demonstrating Tamper Detection with Heads

    We are excited about the future of Heads on Librem laptops and the extra level of protection it can give customers. As a result we’ve both been writing about it a lot publicly and working on it a lot privately. What I’ve realized when I’ve talked to people about Heads and given demos, is that many people have never seen a tamper-evident boot process before. All of the concepts around tamper-evident boot are pretty abstract and it can be difficult to fully grasp how it protects you if you’ve never seen it work.

    We have created a short demo that walks through a normal Heads boot process and demonstrates tamper detection. In the interest of keeping the demo short I only briefly described what was happening. In this post I will elaborate on what you are seeing in the video.

  • Stop Using Six Digit Numeric iPhone Passcodes Right Now

Software: Tuptime , dutree, gotop, Nginx

Filed under
Software
  • Tuptime - Tool to Display Uptime History of Linux System

    The primary task of the system administrators is monitoring and examine Linux system and how long its been promenade. This article demonstrates use of Tuptime tool that help's System Administrators to analyse how long Linux machine is up and running.

    Tuptime tool counts accidental system restarts and not just only uptime of system. When tuptime is installed on system it registers first boot time after installation. Once the first boot time is registered from there onwards it checks for system tuptime and downtime and represents it in Percentage (%). Tuptime also registers current tuptime of system from last restart. Reports Largest Running system Time, Shortest Running System Time & Average of both.

  • dutree – A CLI Tool to Analyze Disk Usage in Coloured Output

    dutree is a free open-source, fast command-line tool for analyzing disk usage, written in Rust programming language. It is developed from durep (disk usage reporter) and tree (list directory content in tree-like format) command line tools. dutree therefore reports disk usage in a tree-like format.

  • gotop - A Tool to Monitor System Activity in Linux

    Every Linux administrator has it's own preferences on how to monitor processes in terminal. And you probably know about tools like top and htop. These are tools for process monitoring in terminal without any visualization. And you probably know about gtop and vtop which are also process monitoring terminal tools, but with visualization. In this article, we are going to install and use another terminal based graphical activity monitor called gotop. Unlike the two mentioned above, gotop is written in Go.

  • Nginx 1.14 Web Server Released

    Nginx 1.14.0 is now available as the latest open-source stable release of this popular web server alternative to Apache.

  • Cooking With Linux (without a net): A CMS Smorgasbord

    Today, I'm going to install four popular content management systems. These will be Drupal, Joomla, Wordpress, and Backdrop. If you're trying to decide on what your next CMS platform should be, this would be a great time to tune in. And yes, I'll do it all live, without a net, and with a high probability of falling flat on my face. Join me today, at 12 noon, Easter Time. Be part of the conversation.

KDE: Amarok, CMake 3.11 in FreeBSD, KDE Connect, and Qt 3D

Filed under
KDE
  • Amarok – A Powerful Cross Platform Music Player

    Amarok is a cross-platform, free, and Open Source music player written in Qt (C++). It was first released on June 23, 2003, and even though it is part of the KDE project, Amarok is released as a software independent of the central KDE Software Compilation release cycle.

    It features a clean, responsive, and customizable User Interface along with Last.fm support, Jamendo service, Dynamic playlists, context view, PopUp dropper, bookmarking, file tracking, multi-language support, and smooth fade-out settings, among many other options.

  • CMake 3.11 in FreeBSD

    The latest release of CMake has landed in FreeBSD. Prior to release we had good contact with KitWare via the bug tracker so there were few surprises left in the actual release. There were still a few last-minute fixes left, in KDE applications no less.

  • KDE Connect: more album art & bluetooth coming soon

    Secondly, I've been working a bit on KDE Connect's bluetooth support. The code was mostly working already, but the remaining stuff is (of course) the hardest part! Nevertheless, more and more parts start working, so I assume it'll come your way in a couple of months. I'll post an update when it's ready for testing.

  • New in Qt 3D 5.11: Generalized Ray Casting

    The 5.11 release of Qt 3D is mostly about speed and stability but it also introduces a number of new features.

    One of them is generalized ray casting which can be used to find objects intersecting a 3d ray.

  • Qt 5.11 Bringing Generalized Ray Casting Support For 3D Module

    The Qt 3D ray-casting support is to be used for finding objects intersecting a 3D ray. This generalized ray-casting support is expected to be useful for applications making use of secondary controllers and VR environments among other possible use-cases where you would want to see what objects intersect with an arbitrary ray.

    For Qt developers wanting to learn more about this generalized ray-casting support coming to Qt 3D, the folks at the KDAB consulting firm have put out a lengthy blog post detailing this new feature for the upcoming Qt 5.11 release.

GNOME 3.28 Release Party and GNOME 3.30 in September

Filed under
GNOME

Ubuntu 18.04 Beta - The good, the bad and mostly ugly

Filed under
Ubuntu

In about two weeks, Canonical will release its next LTS, 18.04 Bionic Beaver. What makes it special is that it's going to be running a Gnome 3 desktop instead of Unity, a sort of full-circle reversal of direction and strategy, and that means ... uncertainty. With Trusty Tahr being the only production Linux system in my setup, I am quite intrigued and concerned, because I need to choose my next LTS carefully.

So far, the prospect isn't encouraging, given the more-than-lukewarm performance by Aardvark. There's a lot of hope in the Plasma spin, given the stellar performance of the Plasma desktop recently, but that's still a big unknown, especially since Kubuntu 17.10 was a regression compared to the most magnificent and awesome Zesty Zapus. Therefore, I decided to check this beta, to see what gives ahead of the official release. Normally, I don't like testing unfinished products, but this be an extraordinary occasion. Let's do it.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.