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Sunday, 18 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Software: LPlayer, GNU Automake, GStreamer, Sigal Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:30pm
Story Red Hat Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:27pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:25pm
Story Mozilla: Mozilla Firefox 60 Plans, Firefox 59 Release and More Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:22pm
Story Openwashing Microsoft Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:21pm
Story Security: HIPAA, Updates, Let’s Encrypt Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 9:18pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 8:43pm
Story Raspbian Remix Lets You Create Your Own Spin That You Can Install on PC or Mac Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 8:38pm
Story Benchmarks Of Russia's "Baikal" MIPS-Based Processors, Running Debian Linux Rianne Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 8:36pm
Story Devices: Raspberry Pi, Arduino, LimeSDR and More Roy Schestowitz 15/03/2018 - 7:51pm

Games: Life is Strange, Unreal Engine 4.19, Slime Rancher and More

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  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm Is Coming to Linux and Mac This Spring

    UK-based video games publisher Feral Interactive announced today that it would port the standalone adventure story Life is Strange: Before the Storm to the Linux and macOS platforms this spring.

    Feral Interactive already brought Linux gamers the episodic graphic adventure video game Life Is Strange developed by Dontnod Entertainment and published by Square Enix, and they now plan to bring the new, three-part standalone story Life is Strange: Before the Storm, which is developed by Deck Nine.

  • Life is Strange: Before the Storm is officially coming to Linux, port from Feral Interactive

    Life is Strange: Before the Storm [Steam], the standalone story adventure set three years before the original is officially heading to Linux! Feral Interactive have today announced that it will arrive sometime this Spring.

    Feral Interactive ported the original Life is Strange episodes to Linux, so I’m not surprised they’re teaming up again to bring Before the Storm to Linux. I think they did a very good job of the port before and I certainly enjoyed it a lot. Life is Strange: Before the Storm - Deluxe Edition for Linux will include all three episodes along with the bonus episode, "Farewell".

  • Feral Bringing Life is Strange: Before the Storm To Linux

    hile still working on A Total War Saga: THRONES OF BRITANNIA and Rise of The Tomb Raider to Linux this spring, Feral Interactive has now confirmed another port coming to Linux (and macOS).

    This spring Feral will also be delivering Life is Strange: Before the Storm to Linux and macOS. This adventure story game is being ported to Linux/macOS by Feral while they haven't yet announced the system requirements nor confirming yet if it will be an OpenGL or Vulkan port.

  • Unreal Engine 4.19 Brings Resonance Audio, AR Improvements & Better Landscape Rendering

    As a nice Pi Day surprise and a week ahead of the Game Developers' Conference (GDC 18) is a new Unreal Engine 4 release from Epic Games.

    Unreal Engine 4.19 has over one hundred improvements compared to UE 4.18 and a wealth of fixes. Among the highlights of Unreal Engine 4.19 include temporal upsampling support, a unified AR framework, physical light units, sequencer improvements, HTC VIVE Pro VR headset support, landscape rendering optimizations, an experimental proxy LOD system, experimental material layering support, and more.

  • Slime Rancher's big Mochi's Megabucks update is out, fixes Linux blackscreen issues

    Slime Rancher [GOG, Steam], the game about running around sucking up cute (and some not so cute) slimes and running a farm is easily one of the sweetest games available on Linux and the Mochi's Megabucks update is rather good.

    Firstly, you no longer need to tweak anything to get around the old Unity3D bug where on Linux you would get a blackscreen, as they've updated Unity for this release and it works perfectly now!

  • Serious Sam's Bogus Detour is being pirated with permission from the developer

    According to TorrentFreak, Serious Sam's Bogus Detour [Steam] is being pirated by Voksi, one of the people known for cracking Denuvo.

  • KING Art have remastered their 'whodunit' adventure The Raven – Legacy of a Master Thief and it's out now
  • Citra, the work in progress Nintendo 3DS emulator now has a much improved OpenGL renderer

    For those who love emulation, you might want to know about Citra [Official Site], a work in progress Nintendo 3DS emulator that we've never written about here before. It seems they've been hard at work too!

    Unlike the Dolphin emulator for the GameCube and the Wii, Citra is not currently moving towards Vulkan. Instead, they've poured a lot of work into their current OpenGL renderer to improve performance and fix rendering issues and from what they've shown, it's getting quite impressive.

LLVM Clang 6.0 vs. 5.0 Compiler Performance On Intel/AMD Linux

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Since last week's big release of LLVM 6.0 along with Clang 6.0, I have been carrying out some fresh compiler benchmarks of the previous Clang 5.0 to this new stable release that switches to C++14 by default, among many other changes to LLVM itself and this C/C++ compiler front-end.

For your compiler benchmark viewing pleasure today are results of LLVM Clang 5.0 vs. 6.0 on four distinctly different systems: two Intel, two AMD, for getting a glimpse at how the Clang 6.0 compiler performance is looking at this time. For those wondering how Clang 6.0 is stacking up compared to the soon-to-be-released GCC 8.1 compiler, those benchmarks will come when GCC 8.1 is officially available.

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Meet the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

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Raspberry Pi just celebrated its sixth birthday—that's six years since the launch of the original Raspberry Pi. Since then, it has released various new models, including the Pi 2, Pi 3, and Pi Zero. So far, 9 million Raspberry Pi 3s have been sold—and over 18 million Pis in total—and those numbers are likely to grow following today's announcement of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+.

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Also: Raspberry Pi 3B+ Launches With Faster CPU, Dual-Band 802.11ac, Faster Ethernet

Introducing GNOME 3.28: “Chongqing”

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GNOME 3.28 is the latest version of GNOME 3, and is the result of 6 months’ hard work by the GNOME community. It contains major new features, as well as many smaller improvements and bug fixes. In total, the release incorporates 25832 changes, made by approximately 838 contributors.

3.28 has been named “Chongqing” in recognition of the team behind GNOME.Asia 2017. GNOME.Asia is GNOME’s official annual summit in Asia, which is only possible thanks to the hard work of local volunteers. This year’s event was held in Chongqing, China, and we’d like to thank everyone who contributed to its success.

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Also: GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

GNOME 3.28 'Chongqing' Linux and BSD desktop environment is here

GNOME 3.28 Desktop Officially Released

Raspberry Pi 3 gets rev’d to B+ with 1.4GHz, WiFi-ac, and GbE with PoE

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The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ has gone on sale for $35, boosting the Model B’s quad -A53 SoC to 1.4GHz, speeding the WiFi to precertified, dual-band 802.11ac, and adding USB-based GbE with PoE support.

Two years after the arrival of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B, which brought wireless and 64-bit ARMv8 computing to what was already the most popular Linux hacking platform of all time, Raspberry Pi Trading and the Raspberry Pi Foundation have delivered a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ with a faster processor, WiFi, and Ethernet.

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Airbus ditches Microsoft, flies off to Google

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The “decision that will shape our company” was confirmed by Airbus CEO Tom Enders in a memo to staff – seen by The Register – who said the business is gearing up for the next phase of “digital transformation”.

“We need technology that actively supports our new ways of working, modern digital tools that allow us to be fully collaborative, to work across our many different team, across border and time zones - to truly be one.”

With this in mind, “Airbus has decided to take a major transformative step by moving from the Microsoft Office environment to Google Suite,” Enders said.

“Choosing G-Suite is a strategic choice, a clean break with the past while assuring business continuity. Let’s embark together on this journey towards a truly collaborative enterprise,” he said.

For anyone living under a rock for years, G-Suite is a line of web-based computing, productivity and collaboration tools that were initially launched under the Google Apps for Your Domain brand in 2006.

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Security: AMD and Samba Flaws

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IPFire 2.19 - Core Update 119 released

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This is the release announcement for IPFire 2.19 – Core Update 119. It updates the toolchain of the distribution and fixes a number of smaller bug and security issues. Therefore this update is another one of a series of general housekeeping updates to make IPFire better, faster and of course more secure!

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Also: NuTyX 10.1 available with cards 2.4.0

Adelaide Uni open sources venerable Ludwig editor

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The University of Adelaide will release the source code of the Ludwig editor, originally developed for use on VAX minicomputers.

Ludwig’ source code will be published on GitHub under the MIT Open Source Licence, the university announced today.

DEC’s first VAX system, the VAX-11/78, was unveiled in 1977. Adelaide Uni purchased three of the minicomputers in 1979.

The computers supported interaction through video terminals and replaced punch-card-driven systems that only offered batch processing and printed output,

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Also: 4 reasons enterprise open source works best

5 open source card and board games for Linux

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Gaming has traditionally been one of Linux's weak points. That has changed somewhat in recent years thanks to Steam, GOG, and other efforts to bring commercial games to multiple operating systems, but many of those games are not open source. Sure, the games can be played on an open source operating system, but that is not good enough for an open source purist.

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What legal remedies exist for breach of GPL software?

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Last April, a federal court in California handed down a decision in Artifex Software, Inc. v. Hancom, Inc., 2017 WL 1477373 (N.D. Cal. 2017), adding a new perspective to the forms of remedies available for breach of the General Public License (GPL). Sadly, this case reignited the decades-old license/contract debate due to some misinterpretations under which the court ruled the GPL to be a contract. Before looking at the remedy developments, it’s worth reviewing why the license debate even exists.

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i.MX8M SBC on pre-order for $165

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Boundary Devices has launched a $165 “Nitrogen8M” SBC that runs Linux or Android on a quad-core i.MX8M with GbE, WiFi, BT, HDMI 2.0, mini-PCIe, MIPI-DSI and -CSI, 4x USB 3.0, and optional -40 to 85°C support.

Boundary Devices has updated its Nitrogen line of NXP i.MX based SBCs with a Nitrogen8M model that runs Android, Yocto, Ubuntu, Buildroot, or Debian based Linux on NXP’s i.MX8M. Available on pre-order starting at $165 with 2GB RAM, the SBC will ship this Spring.

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Arduino Create expands to run Arduino on BeagleBone and Raspberry Pi

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Arduino announced an expansion of its Arduino Create development platform for deploying Arduino sketches on Linux systems to support Arm boards like the the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone in addition to Intel boards like the UP Squared.

In November, Arduino announced a version of its Arduino Create toolkit that supports Intel-based systems running Linux, with specific support for a new UP Squared IoT Grove Development Kit. Today at the Embedded Linux Conference in Portland, where Arduino co-founder and CTO Massimo Banzi is a keynote speaker, Arduino announced an expansion of Arduino Create to support Arm boards. The platform provides optimized support for the Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone boards.

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Neptune 5.0 Linux OS Released with KDE Plasma 5.12 LTS, Based on Debian Stretch

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Powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.14 kernel ported from Debian Stretch's Backports repository, Neptune 5.0 uses the latest KDE Plasma 5.12 desktop environment along with the KDE Applications 17.12 and KDE Frameworks 5.43.0 software suites. It also promises new ways to run the latest software versions.

"This version marks a new iteration within the Neptune universe. It switches its base to the current Debian Stable "Stretch" version and also changes slightly the way we will provide Updates for Neptune. We will no longer strive to bring in more recent versions of Plasma, Kernel or other software on our own," reads the release announcement.

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SMARC module features hexa-core i.MX8 QuadMax

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iWave unveiled a rugged, wireless enabled SMARC module with 4GB LPDDR4 and dual GbE controllers that runs Linux or Android on NXP’s i.MX8 QuadMax SoC with 2x Cortex-A72, 4x -A53, 2x -M4F, and 2x GPU cores.

iWave has posted specs for an 82 x 50mm, industrial temperature “iW-RainboW-G27M” SMARC 2.0 module that builds on NXP’s i.MX8 QuadMax system-on-chip. The i.MX8 QuadMax was announced in Oct. 2016 as the higher end model of an automotive focused i.MX8 Quad family.

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today's leftovers

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Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

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  • Per-Window Flipping In Present With XWayland Support Revised

    While the belated X.Org Server 1.20 is onto the release candidate stage, there still are some feature patches expected to land and among them is the per-window flipping support in the Present extension with support wired through for XWayland.

    Worked on last summer via GSoC 2017 was this support by Roman Gilg with a goal of reducing tearing in XWayland windowed environments by adding per-window page-flipping support to Present and wiring that up to XWayland so those X11 apps atop Wayland wouldn't be bound to using just one buffer.

  • Airlie Moves Ahead With His Plan For Soft FP64 For Mesa, OpenGL 4.3 For Evergreen GPUs

    Yesterday we wrote about David Airlie working on a fresh push to get "soft FP64" support in Mesa for allowing some older graphics cards on the R600g driver to then have OpenGL 4 support thanks to this double-precision floating-point support being their last blocker. That code is moving forward.

    The soft FP64 support within GLSL shaders is the work originally done by former GSoC contributor Elie Tournier. Airlie is preparing to merge that code along with various changes he has made since then, including the option for Gallium3D drivers to individually decide about opting in or not to this emulated FP64 support.

  • Mesa Developers Working To Figure Out How To Improve Their Release Process

    Following the very bumpy Mesa 17.3 releases, Mesa developers are currently discussing ideas for improving the release process moving forward.

    Mesa 17.3 was shipping with some nasty bugs that went uncaught among other issues leading some to feel that the 17.3 series has been their worst release in recent memory. But the good news is that's been igniting the discussion the past week about how to turn this situation around.

Server: Kubernetes, Apache Cassandra, and OpenStack Queens

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  • Container orchestration top trumps: Let's just pretend you don't use Kubernetes already

    Container orchestration comes in different flavours, but actual effort must be put into identifying the system most palatable.

    Yes, features matter, but so too does the long-term viability of the platform. There's been plenty of great technologies in the history of the industry, but what's mattered has been their viability, as defined by factors such as who owns them, whether they are open source (and therefore sustained by a community), or outright M&A.

    CoreOS, recently bought by Red Hat, offered Fleet. Fleet, alas for Fleet users, was discontinued because Kubernetes "won".

  • 6 ways Apache Cassandra prepares you for a multi-cloud future

    The incentives for enterprises to pursue a multi-cloud deployment strategy—a cloud-agnostic infrastructure, greater resilience, the flexibility that comes from not being reliant on any single vendor, to name just a few—have never been more compelling, and they are constantly increasing. Yes, the technological feat of implementing and managing deployments that straddle multiple clouds comes with some challenges. But as the need for this future-ready architecture increases, Apache Cassandra is a uniquely primed open source database solution for enabling such deployments.

  • How Containers Work in OpenStack Queens

    There are many different ways in which containers are used and enabled throughout the open-source OpenStack cloud platform. With the OpenStack Queens platform, which was released on Feb. 28, there are even more options than ever before.

    OpenStack has been supporting containers for several years, beginning with the nova-docker driver in the OpenStack Nova compute project that has now been deprecated. Among the different OpenStack container efforts in 2018 are Zun, Magnum, Kuryr, Kolla, LOCI, OpenStack-Helm and Kata containers.

  • The cost of hosting in the cloud

    Should we host in the cloud or on our own servers? This question was at the center of Dmytro Dyachuk's talk, given during KubeCon + CloudNativeCon last November. While many services simply launch in the cloud without the organizations behind them considering other options, large content-hosting services have actually moved back to their own data centers: Dropbox migrated in 2016 and Instagram in 2014. Because such transitions can be expensive and risky, understanding the economics of hosting is a critical part of launching a new service. Actual hosting costs are often misunderstood, or secret, so it is sometimes difficult to get the numbers right. In this article, we'll use Dyachuk's talk to try to answer the "million dollar question": "buy or rent?"

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More in Tux Machines

2018 Affiliate and Individual Member Election Results

The OSI would like to thank all of those who ran for the Board. Volunteering to serve the OSI and support the Open Source community is a tremendous commitment in time and energy--we truly appreciate their willingness to contribute to our continued success and participate in our ongoing work to promote and protect open source software, communities, and development as well as the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement. The winners of the 2018 Board of Directors elections are, VM Brasseur (elected by the Individual Membership) Chris Lamb (elected by the Affiliate Membership) Faidon Liambotis (elected by the Affiliate Membership) Josh Simmons (elected by the Individual Membership) Read more

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

Games and Wine: Dark Old Sun, Surviving Mars, Wine-Staging 3.4, Wine 3.4

  • Varied shoot 'em up Dark Old Sun adds Linux support, lots of different enemies and upgrades to try
    For those who can't get enough shoot 'em up action, Dark Old Sun [Steam] recently added Linux support and it looks pretty varied. It originally released on March 8th, with Linux support arriving only a few days later on the 16th.  It has three different game modes: An Arcade/Story mode with 6 different stages, a Challenge mode and a Survival mode where you face off against waves of enemies and random events.
  • Surviving Mars already has a fix out for the Linux text problem, plus more thoughts
  • Looking for a Battle Royale game that works on Linux? 2D browser-based is one
    I know, a bunch of you are probably already running away due to it being browser-based, but I find that really quite interesting. is actually not bad at all. Basic of course, since it's a top-down 2D game that runs directly in the browser, but that's also what makes it so interesting. You can play it on basically anything and if you want to team up with someone, it generates a link for you to send them and away you go. You can also play with strangers on a team as well, which also works surprisingly well with the simple emotes system to give them a thumbs up, or a sad face.
  • Wine-Staging 3.4 Released With MS Office Anti-Aliased Fonts, BattlEye Fixes
    Fresh off the release of Wine 3.4 on Friday, the maintainers corralling the Wine-Staging releases have now put out their second modern release. Wine-Staging 3.4 was released minutes ago since Alistair Leslie-Hughes managed to take-over the Wine-Staging maintenance and get out the recent v3.3 release. They have continued re-basing their patches against Wine upstream, more than 1000 in total. They are also working to upstream those patches where appropriate.
  • Wine 3.4 released with more Vulkan support
    Another Wine development release with Wine 3.4 that continues to add in more Vulkan support making another exciting release.