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Sunday, 18 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Government of Jamaica to Actively Pursue Greater Use of Open Source Software – Wheatley Roy Schestowitz 17/03/2018 - 2:47am
Story 3D Printing and Open Source Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 9:24pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 9:23pm
Story Private Internet Access releases software as open source Roy Schestowitz 2 16/03/2018 - 8:59pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 7:27pm
Story Security: 17 Things Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 7:17pm
Story Linux Foundation unveils open source hypervisor for IoT products Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 7:10pm
Story NXP IoT platform links ARM/Linux Layerscape SoCs to cloud Rianne Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 7:06pm
Story Games Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 12:44pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2018 - 11:43am

LLVM Release Schedules and DragonFFI

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​Linus Torvalds slams CTS Labs over AMD vulnerability report

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CTS Labs, a heretofore unknown Tel Aviv-based cybersecurity startup, has claimed it's found over a dozen security problems with AMD Ryzen and EPYC processors. Linus Torvalds, Linux's creator, doesnt buy it.

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Open source project aims to build embedded Linux hypervisor

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The Linux Foundation announced an Intel-backed embedded reference hypervisor project called “ACRN” that features real-time and safety-critical features for Linux and Android IoT and automotive projects.

At the Embedded Linux Conference in Portland, Oregon, the Linux Foundation announced a project called ACRN (like “acorn”) based on Intel technology that will develop a lightweight, open source embedded reference hypervisor. Licensed with the permissive BSD-3-Clause, the technology supports a variety of IoT applications including automotive.

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Microsoft is Still Evil and Dangerous

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Sound Open Firmware (SOF) and Nvidia-Docker

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  • Intel Open-Sources Sound Firmware, Pushing For More Open Firmware

    Imad Sousou, Intel's GM of the Open-Source Technology Center, had some interesting remarks to make during his keynote today as part of this week's Embedded Linux Conference in Portland.

    First up, they have two new open-source project announcements: ACRN and Sound Open Firmware (SOF).

    Sound Open Firmware has us most excited with Intel's focus now on opening up more of their firmware, beginning with audio. Sound Open Firmware includes an open-source audio DSP firmware and SDK. The SOF stack works on all Intel hardware platforms and can assist in debugging audio/DSP issues.

  • A Primer on Nvidia-Docker — Where Containers Meet GPUs

    GPUs are critical for training deep learning models and neural networks. Though it may not be needed for simple models based on linear regression and logistic regression, complex models designed around convolutional neural networks (CNNs) and recurrent neural networks heavily rely on GPUs. Especially computer vision-related models based on frameworks such as Caffe2 and TensorFlow have a dependency on GPU.

    In supervised machine learning, a set of features and labels are used to train a model. Deep learning algorithms don’t even need explicit features to evolve trained models. They pretty much “learn” from existing datasets designated for training, testing, and evaluation.

Software: AMP, GCompris, Terminus, PyCharm, Rcpp, Curl

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  • AMP – A Vi/Vim Inspired Text Editor for Linux Terminal

    Amp is a lightweight, fully-featured Vi/Vim inspired text editor for your Linux terminal, written in Rust. It provides the core interaction model of Vi/Vim in a simplified way, and puts together the fundamental features required for a modern text editor.

    It is a zero-configuration, no-plugins and terminal-based user interface that combines extremely well with terminal emulators such as tmux and Alacritty. Amp also supports a modal, keyboard-driven interface inspired by Vim that makes navigating and editing text fast.

  • GCompris Qt 0.90
  • Terminus – A Web Technology Based Modern Terminal

    Terminus is a cross-platform, open source, web technology based Terminal for modern age. It is heavily inspired from Hyper, a beautiful terminal built on web technologies. Unlike the traditional terminals, Terminus ships with some cool features by default. It is fully customizable with multiple app themes and color schemes for the terminal. We can spawn or hide Terminus using a global hotkey. It keeps the current directory in all newly opened tabs. You can also extend the functionality of Terminus by installing plugins.

  • PyCharm - Python IDE Full Review

    Pycharm is a Python Integrated Development Environment for Professional Developers and also anyone who can code in python or even learning how to code in python. There are two versions, a paid professional version or a community edition which is free for use. Though not all features in the professional version are included in the community edition. Alright, let’s dig into it.

  • Rcpp 0.12.16: A small update
  • Here’s curl 7.59.0

    We ship curl 7.59.0 exactly 49 days since the previous release (a week shorter than planned because of reasons).


Linux Foundation: Ads, Events, and Memberships

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  • SDN Trends: The Business Benefits and Emerging SD-WAN Technology [Ed: "This article was sponsored by Alibaba and written by" LF now writing ads for Alibaba, too.]
  • Speak at Automotive Linux Summit & OS Summit Japan — 4 Days Left to Submit a Proposal

    Automotive Linux Summit (ALS) connects the developers, vendors, and users driving innovation in Automotive Linux. Co-located with Open Source Summit Japan, ALS will gather over 1,000 attendees from global companies leading and accelerating the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected vehicle.

  • The Linux Foundation Welcomes Sound Open Firmware Project

    The Linux Foundation announced today that Sound Open Firmware (SOF) has become a Linux Foundation project. With significant engineering and code contributions from Intel® Corporation, SOF includes a digital signal processing (DSP) firmware and an SDK that together provide infrastructure and development tools for developers working on audio or signal processing. Intel and Google support SOF and invite others to join them in advancing the project.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

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Red Hat

Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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  • build service now supports creation of VM disk images

    You can define a disk image size, select a language, set a user and root password, select a Debian distribution and enable backports just by one click. It's possible to add your public key for access to the root account without a password. This can also be done by just specifying your GitHub account. Several disk formats are supports, like raw (compressed with xz or zstd), qcow2, vdi, vhdx and vmdk. And you can add your own list of packages, you want to have inside this OS. After a few minutes the disk image is created and you will get a download link, including a log the the creation process and a link to the FAI configuration that was used to create your customized image.

  • aput - simple upload script for a flat artifactory Debian repository
  • Univention Corporate Server 4.3: Simpler, Faster, and More User-Friendly Administration

    Univention is proud to present the latest Univention Corporate Server (UCS) release. Version 4.3 of the established Open Source software now allows administrators to customize the portal pages which can be set up in UCS to suit the specific requirements of their organization very simply via the drag and drop feature. In addition, they are also able to make the more than 90 enterprise applications in UCS’ integrated App Center available to users. The users access these applications via the portal pages and, insofar as the respective application permits, only need to log in once thanks to the single sign-on mechanism. Univention has also considerably improved the data import performance. In this way, UCS 4.3 allows smaller companies to administrate heterogeneous IT environments with ease and fulfills the requirements of larger organizations with tens of thousands of users at the same time.

  • EzeeLinux Show 18.12 | A BIG THANK YOU, First Look At Ubuntu 18.04
  • LXD weekly status #38
  • Lets Snap The World

    I am a long-time Ubuntu user and community contributor. I love how open-source communities generally work, sure there are hiccups, like companies mandating decisions that aren't popular amongst the community. The idea of I being able to fix an issue and getting that released to hundreds of thousands of people is just priceless for me.

    For the long time, I have distinguished some issues in Linux on the desktop that I want fixed. Biggest is always having the latest version of the software I use. Think of Android for example, you always get the latest version of the app, directly from the developers with no package maintainer in between. That's the ideal scenario but for us currently on Linux it may not be possible in all cases because of the fragmentation we have.


Devices: New Raspberry Pi 3 Model, Arduino, RISC-V and Android

  • New Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ now on-sale, more power and faster networking
  • Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ Launched: Offers More Power, Faster Networking
  • Raspberry PI 3 model B+ Released: Complete specs and pricing
  • Arduino Create Platform Can Now Program Linux Internet of Things Devices

    The official Arduino development team has today revealed at the Embedded Linux Conference 2018 expansion of a number of architectures supported by its Arduino Create platform for the development of Internet of Things applications. The latest release allows Arduino Create users can manage and program a wide range of popular Linux single-board computers such as the awesome Raspberry Pi which has today received a new addition to its range in the form of the Raspberry Pi 3+, AAEON UP² and BeagleBone as if they were regular Arduino development boards.

  • An introduction to RISC-V

    LWN has covered the open RISC-V ("risk five") processor architecture before, most recently in this article. As the ecosystem and tools around RISC-V have started coming together, a more detailed look is in order. In a series of two articles, I will look at what RISC-V is and follow up with an article on how we can now port Linux distributions to run on it.

    The words "Free and Open RISC Instruction Set Architecture" are emblazoned across the web site of the RISC-V Foundation along with the logos of some possibly surprising companies: Google, hard disk manufacturer Western Digital, and notable ARM licensees Samsung and NVIDIA. An instruction set architecture (ISA) is a specification for the instructions or machine code that you feed to a processor and how you encode those instructions into a binary form, along with many other precise details about how a family of processors works. Modern ISAs are huge and complex specifications. Perhaps the most famous ISA is Intel's x86 — that specification runs to ten volumes.

    More importantly, ISAs are covered by aggressive copyright, patent, and trademark rules. Want to independently implement an x86-compatible processor? Almost certainly you simply cannot do that without making arrangements with Intel — something the company rarely does. Want to create your own ARM processor? You will need to pay licensing fees to Arm Holdings up front and again for every core you ship.

    In contrast, open ISAs, of which RISC-V is only one of the newest, have permissive licenses. RISC-V's specifications, covering user-space instructions and the privileged instructions are licensed under a Creative Commons license (CC BY 4.0). Furthermore, researchers have determined that all RISC-V instructions have prior art and are now patent-free. (Note this is different from saying that implementations will be open or patent-free — almost certainly the highest end chips will be closed and implementations patented). There are also several "cores" — code that compiles to Verilog and can be programmed into an FPGA or (with a great deal more effort) made into a custom chip — licensed under the three-clause BSD.

  • Essential Phone Users Are Finally Getting the Android 8.1 Oreo Update
  • How to Get Missing Apps from Your Android Phone to Your Wear Watch

OSS Leftovers

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  • New Raspberry Pi 3B+, Infection Monkey, Samba Password Bug, Facebook's Profilo and More

    Facebook open-sourced Profilo yesterday, "a scalable, mobile-first performance tracing library for Android". Profilo eases the mobile testing challenges faced by app developers trying to ensure their apps perform across various operating systems, bandwidths and other variables, and allows developers to "understand app performance in the wild".

  • Open Source Data Management for All

    We found that several of our readers had heard of iRODS and knew it was associated with a scientific computing base, but few understood what the technology was and were not aware that there was a consortium. To dispel any confusion, we spoke with Jason Coposky, executive director of the iRODS Consortium about both the technology itself and the group’s role in making data management and storage easier.

  • Mozilla sends more snooping Web APIs to smartphone Siberia

    irefox has revealed it will bin more privacy-invasive APIs, deprecating access to the light sensor, device proximity sensor, and user proximity detection.

    The APIs in question have all been criticised for their invasive potential. For example, devicelight offered potential vectors for snooping on user browsing habits or even passwords.

    The other two APIs are deviceproximity and userproximity. As of Firefox 62, these will become user-controlled flags (and for users at the bleeding edge, the deprecation is implemented in the nightly build).

  • Firefox 59 for Android Adds HLS Playback Support, Improves Private Browsing Mode

    Mozilla released today the Firefox 59 web browser for Google's Android mobile operating system bringing support for websites that use the HTTP Live Streaming protocol for video playback, and improved Private Browsing mode, and more.

  • GRUB Now Supports Multiple Early Initrd Images

    GNU's GRUB bootloader has picked up another feature ahead of the GRUB 2.04 release expected later this year.

    It's been almost one year since the GRUB 2.02 release while GRUB 2.04 continues being developed with new features and the latest addition landed just minutes ago.

    This new addition to the GRUB 2.04 code-base is adding support for multiple, shared, early initrd images. These multiple early initrd images will be loaded prior to the proper initrd image -- with support for the Linux distribution specifying early initrd images and a separate hook for the user to specify any early images too.

  • Global Automotive Navigation Systems Market 2018-2022 - Increased Support for Open Source and Standard Platforms
  • Five Questions with Orta Therox

    Everyone in the Artsy Engineering team has different relationships to Open Source. Some people just work in the open — with little thought applied to the larger community aspects of it — because it’s how we work. Others embrace the ability to showcase their work to help provide a more holistic understanding of the process.

    Not all projects we work on are open source, so not all engineers work in the open. We made the conscious choice to keep some projects private: it’s Open Source by Default, not Open Source by Mandate.

  • SpaceChain, Arch Aim to Archive Human Knowledge in Space

    SpaceChain on Monday announced that it has entered a partnership with the Arch Mission Foundation to use open source technology to launch an ambitious project involving the storage of large data sets in spacecraft and on other planets.

    Arch Mission will load large quantities of data onto SpaceChain's satellite vehicles with the eventual aim of storing data on other planets.

    "The goal of archiving and preserving knowledge of future generations will advance archiving science and human knowledge by itself," SpaceChain cofounder Zheng Zuo said. "The ambitious goal of disseminating this knowledge throughout the solar system is finally achievable today, thanks to greatly reduced launch costs through new space launch providers."


    The partnership would allow SpaceChain's long-term goal of storing data archives throughout the solar system come to fruition.

  • Two UMD courses will have free online textbook access in the fall

    BSCI201 and 202, introductory courses in human anatomy and physiology, will use a free, open-source textbook from OpenStax beginning in the fall, said biology professor Sara Lombardi.

    To make the switch, university lecturers for the courses received a $1,500 grant from the Maryland Open Source Textbook initiative, which offers grants to encourage faculty to utilize open educational resources. The grants were announced March 6.

    The initiative — which was established in 2013 as part of the system's William E. Kirwan Center for Academic Innovation — saved students more than $500,000 through these grants from spring 2014 to spring 2017, according to the initiative's spring 2018 update.

  • OpenFlow is the Past as ONF Announces Stratum Project to Redefine SDN

    On March 12, the ONF announced the formation of the Stratum project with the audacious goal to redefine the SDN landscape in a fundamental way. Code for the Stratum project is initially coming from Google, from technology it uses for SDN within its own environments.

    Among the vendors that are backing the ONF Stratum project are Google, Tencent, China Unicom, NTT, Turk Telekom, Big Switch Networks, VMware, Broadcom, Cavium, Mellanox and Xilinx.

Linux Mint 18.3 KDE Edition Review – For The Record

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Linux Mint 18.3 KDE Edition Review. Linux Mint and KDE haven’t always been on my list of favorite things. That said, Linux Mint 18.3 KDE Edition really surprised me – there is a lot to like! Great pulseaudio settings, an improved package manager, plus a whole lot more!

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MATE 1.20 review - Are you all right, mate?

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Overall, MATE 1.20 is a nice desktop environment. It has its legacy quirks, especially when it comes to panel management and overall cross-integration between programs. But it can be styled and tamed and used with flair and elegance. However, you do feel that it's aged in some areas, and that those areas remain neglected. Modern does not mean better, but some aspects of the 2018 computing model are superior to what we had a decade ago. The same way some aspects of MATE (Gnome 2) remain better than the touchesque flat-fest we have today.

Xfce seems to have weathered these changes more successfully, but then it also had no identity crisis, no betrayal, and it benefits from more overall focus and attention. MATE not only had to fight Gnome 3, it also has Cinnamon to take into account. Those aside, if you do want an old-school, no-nonsense desktop environment, MATE is a good choice. Perhaps not the best one, but it will serve you loyally without any bells and whistles. Just be ready for an odd ghost of the past striking at you now and then.

Remember, once upon a time, I didn't like Xfce, like not at all, and look where it's now. So MATE has survived the rite of passage, and it's evolving steadily. The next step should be pro looks, tight integration and some acknowledgment of modernity, on a system level, and perhaps it could become the desktop environment that Gnome 3 should have been in the first place. There's still hope. Keep an eye, and let's see what happens. I guess that would be all.

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Security: AMD, Updates, Reproducible Builds and More

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  • Israeli firm dumps AMD flaws with 24 hours notice

    Security researchers from a previously unknown Israeli company, CTS Labs, have disclosed 13 flaws in AMD processors. All can be taken advantage of only by an attacker who has already gained admin privileges within the system in question.

  • “Backdoor” Found In AMD CPUs, Researchers Discover 13 Critical Vulnerabilities In RYZEN And EPYC
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #150
  • ACME v2 and Wildcard Certificate Support is Live

    We’re pleased to announce that ACMEv2 and wildcard certificate support is live! With today’s new features we’re continuing to break down barriers for HTTPS adoption across the Web by making it even easier for every website to get and manage certificates.

    ACMEv2 is an updated version of our ACME protocol which has gone through the IETF standards process, taking into account feedback from industry experts and other organizations that might want to use the ACME protocol for certificate issuance and management some day.

    Wildcard certificates allow you to secure all subdomains of a domain with a single certificate. Wildcard certificates can make certificate management easier in some cases, and we want to address those cases in order to help get the Web to 100% HTTPS. We still recommend non-wildcard certificates for most use cases.

  • Samba critical flaws: Patch now but older open instances have 'far worse issues'
  • An overview of online ad fraud

    I have researched various aspects of the online advertisement industry for a while, and one of the fascinating topics that I have come across which I didn’t know too much about before is ad fraud. You may have heard that this is a huge problem as this topic hits the news often, and after learning more about it, I think of it as one of the major threats to the health of the Web, so it’s important for us to be more familiar with the problem.

    People have done a lot of research on the topic but most of the material uses the jargon of the ad industry so they may be inaccessible to those who aren’t familiar with it (I’m learning my way through it myself!) and also you’d need to study a lot to put a broad picture of what’s wrong together, so I decided to summarize what I have learned so far, expressed in simple terms avoiding jargon, in the hopes that it’s helpful. Needless to say, none of this should be taken as official Mozilla policy, but rather this is a hopefully objective summary plus some of my opinions after doing this research at the end.

Mozilla Development/News

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  • Making WebAssembly better for Rust & for all languages

    One big 2018 goal for the Rust community is to become a web language. By targeting WebAssembly, Rust can run on the web just like JavaScript. But what does this mean? Does it mean that Rust is trying to replace JavaScript?

    The answer to that question is no. We don’t expect Rust WebAssembly apps to be written completely in Rust. In fact, we expect the bulk of application code will still be JS, even in most Rust WebAssembly applications.

    This is because JS is a good choice for most things. It’s quick and easy to get up and running with JavaScript. On top of that, there’s a vibrant ecosystem full of JavaScript developers who have created incredibly innovative approaches to different problems on the web.

  • March Add(on)ness: Video Download Helper (1) Vs Cookie AD (4)

    Video DownloadHelper is the easy way to download and convert Web videos from hundreds of YouTube-like sites.

    Video DownloadHelper is a strong contender, giving users the ability to snag videos from virtually any site. The add-on automatically finds videos on a webpage. What users do with those videos is nobody’s business and anyone’s guess.

    Fun Fact: 300 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute and almost 5 billion videos are watched on Youtube every single day. If you tried to download all of them, your computer would explode.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 225
  • The new Firefox lets you stop websites from asking to send you notifications

    The Mozilla Foundation released a new version of Firefox this week—release number 59. It treads further down the performance improvement path that November's Quantum release began, but its most interesting feature is a quality-of-life one: Firefox 59 users can prevent some websites from popping up requests to send notifications to your device or from requesting to use your camera unexpectedly.

  • Things Gateway, Part 7 - IKEA TRÅDFRI

    In this series of postings, I've been setting up, configuring, and playing with IoT devices through the experimental Things Gateway from Mozilla. I've covered the generic Zigbee and Z-Wave devices, the Philips Hue devices, and the TP-Link WiFi devices. Today, I add IKEA TRÅDFRI to this circus.

    Of course, in this series, I've also been doing a bit of editorializing. I was critical of the TP-Link devices because their security model requires the end user to just trust them. I'm critical of the IKEA TRÅDFRI for a physical safety reason. What does the word TRÅDFRI mean? I'm assuming it is a Swedish word that means "severe blood loss from slashed wrists" because that is what is likely to happen when opening the package. The clamshell plastic that entombs their products is difficult to open with anything short of a chainsaw. My kitchen scissors wouldn't do the job and I had to resort to garden pruning shears and that left dangerously sharp pieces that drew blood. Be careful.

  • Firefox Performance Update #3

    Hi! I’ve got another slew of Firefox performance work to report today.

    Special thanks to the folks who submitted things through this form to let me know about performance work that’s taken place recently! If you’ve seen something fixed lately that’ll likely have a positive impact on Firefox performance, let me know about it!

LibreELEC (Krypton) 8.2.4 MR

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Team LibreELEC celebrates its second birthday (and international Pi-Day) with the release of LibreELEC (Krypton) v8.2.4 which brings minor bug-fixes and new firmware to support the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ hardware announced this morning.

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With this operating system you can have privacy and anonymity

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With the popularity of social media, it would seem as though people are not all that concerned with their privacy. Some like to share updates about pretty much anything they do, and while no one really cares about what anyone else had for lunch, the point is if you want to know what someone is up to, you may just have to look online.

Just because people aren't bashful about their lives does not mean they want everything they do online to be recorded, yet with the way browsers and operating systems are set up, there is a record of a lot of what we do. Unless you are a programmer, you may not see much of a way around it.

But there is a way, actually. An operating system that is designed to start on almost any computer from a DVD or USB drive exists and, best of all, it is free.

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Also: Tails 3.6 Anonymous OS Released with Linux Kernel 4.15, Latest Tor Updates

The Register Looks at *Ubuntu 18.04 Beta

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  • 18.04 beta is as good a time as any to see which Ubuntu flavour tickles your Budgie, MATE

    The first beta of Ubuntu 18.04 is here. The finished article, due next month, will be a long-term support release and, for those who stick with LTS, the first time many see the new GNOME-based Ubuntu.

    This beta, however, does not include the main GNOME-based release. Instead this is more a community release with most of the Ubuntu flavours participating. This particular test build is slightly more noteworthy than usual since, thanks to the havoc wreaked by Spectre and Meltdown, which limited the use of many distros' build systems, it is really the first milestone for most of the flavours. It also came a couple of days late, which is unusual for an Ubuntu beta.

    As the Xubuntu developers note: "The ISO Tracker has seen little activity for the last few development cycles. We know we have some excited users already using and testing 18.04. But without testing results being recorded anywhere, we have to assume that nobody is testing the daily images and milestones. And this has major implications for both the 18.04 release and the project as a whole."

  • Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver Beta 1 Released

    Many of the popular flavours of the famous Ubuntu Linux system such as Kubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu MATE and Xubuntu, have released beta downloads for the upcoming Long-Term Support release of Ubuntu 18.04.

    Typically, the Ubuntu team releases an LTS edition of the OS, every two years, which will carry major security updates and patches, as well as full support, for five years.

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